Bradley Marck Trager

Bradley Marck Trager
Loyola Marymount University | LMU · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
620
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
76
Citations
Citations since 2016
23 Research Items
76 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220102030
20162017201820192020202120220102030
20162017201820192020202120220102030
20162017201820192020202120220102030
Additional affiliations
June 2020 - present
Loyola Marymount University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2015 - June 2020
Pennsylvania State University
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2013 - June 2015
Lynn University
Position
  • Faculty Member
Education
May 2015 - May 2020
Pennsylvania State University
Field of study
  • Biobehavioral Health
August 2010 - May 2013
Florida Atlantic University
Field of study
  • Experimental Psychology
January 2009 - July 2010
Lynn University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
This event-level study examined within-person differences in consequences for college students who engaged in alcohol-only, marijuana-only, or simultaneous alcohol and marijuana (SAM) use across 18 weekend days. Participants (n = 451) were asked to report consequences they experienced on each occasion across five different types of events: (a) heav...
Article
Background Recent reports indicate that simultaneous alcohol and marijuana (SAM) use is a growing health concern among college students. As SAM use consists of both alcohol and marijuana, risk factors associated with either can serve as plausible targets by prevention efforts to reduce SAM use. Objectives: To explore this, the current study investi...
Article
Past research has explored the content and frequency of alcohol-specific communication between parents and their emerging adult children. The current study aimed to address a gap in the research by examining parents' motivation for discussing alcohol. To accomplish this, we developed a multidimensional Parent Motives for Alcohol Communication Scale...
Article
Parent-based interventions (PBIs) and living at home with one’s parents both have been shown to mitigate alcohol risk associated with the first year of college. The current study extends these findings by examining the independent and interactive effects of these two constructs on first-year drinking. The sample included 82 parent-student dyads. Pa...
Article
Previous research has shown a reliable association between social media (SM) use and drinking among college students. However, most studies have investigated SM behaviors (e.g., time spent on a platform, posting frequency) in isolation and on a single site. While some have studied multiple SM behaviors across platforms using person-centered approac...
Article
While adolescents and underage emerging adults typically obtain alcohol from social sources (e.g., parents, friends, parties), taking alcohol from the home without permission is not well understood. The current study investigated plausible individual characteristics associated with taking alcohol from one’s parents’ home without permission and asso...
Preprint
Parents of young adults may approve of their child drinking in lower risk drinking situations (LRDS) because they believe it will prevent their child from drinking in more risky ways. However, when young adults believe their parents approves of drinking in LRDS they experience more negative alcohol consequences, not less. A plausible explanation fo...
Article
Full-text available
Public health researchers are increasingly interested in the potential relationships between social media (SM) use, well-being, and health behavior among adolescents. However, most research has assessed daily SM time via self-report survey questions, despite a lack of clarity around the accuracy of such reports given the current tendency of youth t...
Article
Background: The purpose of this study was to address a dearth in the literature on non-response bias in parent-based interventions (PBIs) by investigating parenting constructs that might be associated with whether a parent volunteers to participate in a no-incentive college drinking PBI. Method: Incoming first-year students (N = 386) completed an o...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Sexual minority women disproportionately engage in heavy drinking and shoulder the burden of alcohol dependence. Although several intensive interventions are being developed to meet the needs of treatment-seeking sexual minority women, there remains a lack of preventive interventions to reduce drinking and its consequences among women n...
Preprint
Building on Junco’s (2013) study examining the accuracy of self-reported computer-specific time on Facebook, the current study investigates the accuracy of self-reported time on multiple social media (SM) platforms across multiple electronic devices and evaluates whether reporting accuracy is systematically associated with participant sex, individu...
Preprint
Social media (SM) users are a combination of several behaviors across platforms. Patterns of SM use across platforms may be a better indicator of risky drinking than individual behaviors or sets of behaviors examined previously. This longitudinal study addressed this gap in the literature using latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify subpopulatio...
Preprint
Selection effects have been found in health intervention research but have not yet been examined in parent-based alcohol interventions (PBIs). Investigating such effects has been difficult because previous PBI research has only invited specific parents to participate and offered them compensation. The current study investigated selection effects us...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Sexual minority women (SMW) disproportionately engage in heavy drinking and shoulder the burden of alcohol dependence. Although several intensive interventions are being developed to meet the needs of treatment-seeking SMW, there remains a lack of preventative interventions able to reduce drinking and consequences among women not yet mot...
Article
Previous research suggests that exposure to alcohol-related content on social media sites (SMSs) may inflate perceptions of drinking norms, thereby increasing drinking among college students and potentially undermining popular social norms-based alcohol interventions. However, prior research on exposure has used subjective measures of alcohol expos...
Article
Objective This study explored the burgeoning youth practice of possessing a fake, secondary Instagram account known as a “Finsta” in relation to exposure to alcohol-related content and college drinking. Participants First-year university students with at least a primary Instagram account (N = 296) completed online surveys. Method Surveys assessed...
Article
The parental rules toward drinking questionnaire (PRQ; Van der Vorst et al., 2005) assesses strictness toward adolescent drinking situations. The aim of the current study was to address a gap in the literature on the psychometric testing and evaluation of the factor structure of the PRQ. The current sample consisted of Dutch adolescents (N = 2922)...
Article
The present study used a prospective longitudinal design to examine whether willingness to experience negative alcohol-related consequences mediated the effects of personality on consequences (e.g., blacking out, getting into a fight, and regretted sex). Students (N = 2024) were assessed at three time points: fall semester of the students' first ye...
Article
Full-text available
Importance Despite receiving dermatologic care, many patients with or without a history of skin cancer either do not use sun protection or fail to use it in an effective manner. Objective To examine the association of a brief dermatologist-delivered intervention vs usual care with patient satisfaction and sun protection behavior. Design, Setting,...
Article
The current study examined two research aims: (1) Identify latent statuses of college students who share common patterns of single or repeated experiences with distinct types of negative alcohol-related consequences during the first two years of college; and (2) Examine how changes in students' living arrangements were associated with transitions i...
Article
Background: The comorbidity of depressed mood and college student drinking causes consequences for both the individual and society. Aspects of parenting have been shown to be important for college students' well-being. While some interventions are beginning to address this population, few studies have examined how parental monitoring impacts the r...
Article
Introduction: Research has identified college students who experience depressed mood and consume alcohol are at an increased risk for experiencing alcohol problems. The present study identified profiles of differential alcohol use, depression, key psychosocial indicators of drinking (e.g., normative perceptions) and examined the relationship betwe...

Network

Cited By