Bradley Philip Smith

Bradley Philip Smith
Central Queensland University · Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science

BPsych(Hons), PhD

About

96
Publications
51,627
Reads
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1,384
Citations
Citations since 2016
61 Research Items
1210 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Additional affiliations
July 2015 - present
Central Queensland University
Position
  • Senior Lecturer in Psychology

Publications

Publications (96)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Horse riding is growing in popularity, yet it is a dangerous activity and concerns for horse welfare abound. Evidence is emerging that horse welfare and human safety are related, suggesting that improvements in horse welfare will likely lead to improved human safety. A challenge for improving animal welfare, is motivating human behaviour change to...
Article
Appropriate nail care is an important aspect of companion dog health and welfare. Nail trims can be painful for dogs if not done correctly, yet little is known about how dogs experience the procedure, nor the perceptions of owners relating to nail maintenance. The present study aimed to investigate the physiological and behavioural responses of 35...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction. Emerging evidence suggests ridden horse welfare is related to human safety, with better welfare related to better safety. Horse training methods directly affect horse welfare and therefore (likely) human safety. Arguably, learning theory (LT) is considered best practice in horse training, yet equestrians don't always utilize this appr...
Chapter
This chapter provides general operating procedures (GOPs) and guidelines for a variety of non-lethal techniques, which seek to interrupt, reduce or modify the behaviour of wildlife to decrease the occurrence of ‘unwanted’or ‘undesirable’behaviours. In Australia such methods are mostly employed for threatened species protection as part of introduced...
Article
Regular veterinary care is integral to companion dog health and welfare, but fearful patients can inhibit provision of care and pose a risk of injury to veterinary staff. This study aimed to identify the physiological and behavioral responses of a sample of 30 dogs of various age and breed, to a standardized physical examination in a simulated vete...
Article
Full-text available
A number of studies have explored the relationship between religious beliefs and gambling (including gambling fallacies and gambling harm) but report seemingly contradictory findings. While some studies have found religious belief to be positively associated with gambling fallacies, others have found it to be a protective factor from gambling harms...
Article
Ridden horse behaviour problems are common and likely contribute to the dangers of horse riding. Emerging evidence suggests ridden horse behaviour problems likely signal poor welfare, however the relationships between ridden horse behaviour, horse welfare and rider safety, are yet to be fully elucidated. This study seeks to address this gap. Modern...
Article
Full-text available
Human-animal co-sleeping is relatively common among dog owners; however, the nature of this practice is not well understood. Recent investigations have focused on the impact of human-dog co-sleeping on human sleep but have largely ignored the contextual nature of the practice, including with whom, why, and how people share their beds and bedrooms w...
Article
1. Radio‐frequency identification (RFID) tags represent some of the smallest animal borne‐technologies available. They are frequently used for understanding fine‐scale associations between animals and their environments. However, currently available devices are often prohibitively expensive or difficult to customise. 2. We present ‘WildWID’, an ope...
Article
Social-ecological system (SES) frameworks offer a way of diagnosing the economic, environmental, and social issues driving human-canid conflict, and can assist in the development and testing of management interventions. SES-based approaches to carnivore management in the context of conflicts with humans are limited and highlight a growing need to d...
Article
Full-text available
Where wild carnivores such as the Australian dingo interact with and impact on livestock enterprises, lethal control and landscape-scale exclusion are commonly employed. However, interest in alternative non-lethal management approaches has recently increased. This is evidenced by several reviews of non-lethal methods that can be said to be working...
Article
Human-carnivore coexistence can be aided through non-lethal approaches that limit interaction between predators and livestock. Yet, investigations into effective deterrents, particularly in the Australian context with dingoes, are rare. We investigated two potential methods: an acoustic deterrent (series of gunshot noises), and an oversized inflata...
Article
As we enter an era of global mass extinctions, it is important to tackle wildlife research and conservation from multiple fronts, including those made available by wildlife organisations, zoos and sanctuaries. Captive studies are particularly useful when studying free-ranging populations is difficult, and/or when controlled conditions are required....
Article
Millennia of human conflict with wildlife have built a culture of intolerance toward wildlife among some stakeholders. We explored 2 key obstacles to improved human-wildlife coexistence: coexistence inequality (how the costs and benefits of coexisting with wildlife are unequally shared) and intolerance. The costs of coexisting with wildlife are oft...
Article
Full-text available
Humans regularly enter into co-sleeping arrangements with human and non-human partners. Studies of adults who co-sleep report that co-sleeping can impact sleep quality, particularly for women. Although dog owners often choose to bedshare with their dogs, we know relatively little about the nature of these relationships, nor the extent to which co-s...
Article
Full-text available
Attending the veterinary clinic is an integral part of the physical welfare of every companion dog. However, some dogs experience their veterinary visits negatively, which poses a risk of injury to the veterinary staff, their guardian (owner) and themselves. It may also influence the regularity of non-urgent veterinary appointments. To date there h...
Preprint
Full-text available
Attending the veterinary clinic is an integral part of the physical welfare of every companion dog. However, some dogs experience their veterinary visits negatively, which poses a risk of injury to the veterinary staff, their guardian (owner) and themselves during veterinary examinations. It may also influence the regularity of non-urgent veterinar...
Article
Full-text available
The taxonomic status and systematic nomenclature of the Australian dingo remain contentious, resulting in decades of inconsistent applications in the scientific literature and in policy. Prompted by a recent publication calling for dingoes to be considered taxonomically as domestic dogs (Jackson et al. 2017, Zootaxa 4317, 201-224), we review the is...
Article
For many dogs, receiving veterinary care can be a stressful, fearful or traumatic experience. However, understanding and improving the veterinary experience for dogs is challenging due to the dynamic nature of the veterinary visit, the number of stakeholders involved (veterinarian, guardian and dog), and the perception and prior experience of the d...
Article
The effects on dehydration and cognitive performance from heat and/or physical activity are well established in the laboratory, although have not yet been studied for personnel working in occupations such as wildland firefighting regularly exposed to these types of conditions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of temperature and dehydrati...
Article
Full-text available
Mining operations in remote Australia represent a unique opportunity to examine the impact of supplementary food and water provision on local wildlife. Here, we present a dietary analysis of dingoes living at a mine site in the Great Sandy Desert, Western Australia. A total of 270 faeces (scats) were collected from across the mine footprint on two...
Article
Full-text available
This exploratory study aimed to contribute to the limited research on human–animal co-sleeping by investigating the extent to which human sleep is disturbed by co-sleeping with a dog. Five female Australian dog owners and their dogs were fitted with activity monitors for seven nights. Raw activity of the dog and human for each sleep episode were ma...
Article
This study provides insight into the attitudes and perceptions of people who live alongside dingoes in a remote Australian mining town. A mixed-methods, self-administered questionnaire was circulated, targeting employees across 11 departments (n=160). Overall, employees saw dingoes favourably (60.5%), and believed that humans and dingoes should be...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of environmental history provide an important lens through which to analyse our contemporary thinking and practices. Here we consider historic management of the conflict caused by dingo predation on livestock. We present unpublished findings of a comprehensive national survey of graziers’ attitudes, knowledge, and interactions with dingoes...
Article
Full-text available
The period before pups are weaned represents a key developmental stage for canids that is directly related to the survivability of the pack. Yet our understanding of the role of the parents during this period when pups are confined to a den is rather limited. We sought further insight into this period by observing diurnal patterns of pre-weaning de...
Article
Play bows represent a common, highly stereotyped behaviour across the genus Canis. However, much of what we know is limited to the wolf and its domestic derivative, the domestic dog. Here we continue to look at the function of play bows among subspecies/variants of Canis lupus by including the dingo. Comparing dingoes to wolves and dogs may provide...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter provides the question of whether surplus killing was fun, and by approximation, could it be considered a leisure activity. Adversarial viewpoints about wild canids tend to emphasise their role in livestock losses, and surplus killing can evoke particularly emotional responses in this regard. Keeping predators and domestic livestock apa...
Article
Full-text available
Surveys and questionnaires are regularly used in studies of human–animal relationships. However, little attention has been given to understanding how survey participants are provided with instructions for the selection of a single animal within a multi-pet household, let alone the implications for reporting and interpreting data. We reviewed the in...
Article
Existing methods of reducing livestock depredation are heavily biased towards lethal control. However, criticism regarding the efficacy of such practices is rising. In Australia, over 200 years of lethal control has done little to resolve the conflict between dingoes (Canis dingo) and livestock producers. That is, killing dingoes does not necessari...
Article
Full-text available
Endocranial volume was measured in a large sample (n = 128) of free-ranging dingoes (Canis dingo) where body size was known. The brain/body size relationship in the dingoes was compared with populations of wild (Family Canidae) and domestic canids (Canis familiaris). Despite a great deal of variation among wild and domestic canids, the brain/body s...
Article
Pets factor into the daily decision making of many people. Importantly, various characteristics of these human-animal relationships are known to strongly influence pet owners’ risk behavior and, consequently, their animals’ welfare during disasters. Yet, few studies have examined a range of such characteristics concurrently in order to describe ris...
Article
During disasters, the presence of companion animals is an identified risk for household relocation failure as well as premature return. In Australia, where bushfires are a regular summer threat, householders are encouraged to develop a written bushfire action plan that includes pets and animals. As part of this plan, householders are recommended to...
Article
Full-text available
Wild predators that attack people represent a significant challenge to the management authorities charged with conserving populations whilst minimising human safety risk. Fraser Island is home to an iconic population of dingoes (Canis dingo). However, conflict stemming from negative human-dingo interactions (incidents), some resulting in serious hu...
Article
Full-text available
Human sleeping arrangements have evolved over time and differ across cultures. The majority of adults share their bed at one time or another with a partner or child, and many also sleep with pets. In fact, around half of dog and cat owners report sharing a bed or bedroom with their pet(s). However, interspecies co-sleeping has been trivialized in t...
Article
Our understanding of the frequency and duration of maternal care behaviours in the domestic dog during the first two postnatal weeks is limited, largely due to the inconsistencies in the sampling methodologies that have been employed. In order to develop a more concise picture of maternal care behaviour during this period, and to help establish the...
Article
Full-text available
Occasionally, interactions between dingoes (Canis dingo) and people on Fraser Island result in serious injury, and, in one case, death. The risk to human safety from such interactions may be mitigated if people could carry a suitably defensive repellent, similar in principle to bear (Ursus spp.) repellent spray advocated in North America. In the fi...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about reproduction and den site selection by free-ranging dingoes. We present observations of den sites used by dingoes inhabiting a large-scale mining operation located in the Great Sandy Desert, Western Australia. We observed 24 dens concentrated within a 1-km radius. Den sites were generally situated in elevated positions overloo...
Article
Full-text available
K'gari (Fraser Island) offers a rare opportunity for people to observe and encounter wild dingoes. Occasionally, however, such encounters can entail dingoes acting in a threatening or aggressive manner towards people, resulting in human injury and, in one tragic case, death.Asuite of approaches aimed at minimising the risk to human safety posed by...
Article
Full-text available
This review examines the perceptual and behavioural influences that pet-attachment has on the ways in which owners view risk, appraise threat, and respond to environmental hazards. Understanding how human-companion animal relationships function in this context has profound implications for the welfare of both people and their animals. Despite origi...
Article
Full-text available
Simple Summary One of the most important factors influencing the health and welfare of puppies is the decision made by the breeder on which dam and sire they will breed from. Unfortunately, our understanding of what dog breeders consider important when selecting their dogs, particularly the dam, is limited. In order to bridge this gap, we conducted...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how human-animal connections influence risk perception and behaviour in companion animal guardians exposed to bushfire threat in Australia. Although the objective role of psychological bonds with companion animals is well accepted by researchers, subjective interpretations of these bonds by animal guardians are relatively unde...
Article
Full-text available
Context: Few studies have examined the prevalence of animal ownership among populations likely to be at greater risk from disaster events within a bushfire context. Objective: To investigate the proportion of vulnerable community members keeping animals and the types of animals kept, as well as perceived risk of harm to pets, and their inclusion...
Article
Full-text available
An estimated 40% of dogs living as companion dogs are believed to exhibit some form of anxiety or stress-related behavior. Although this represents a significant welfare issue, our understanding of the origins of anxiety in dogs remains limited. Genetics, environment, and training methods have all been investigated, yet little attention has been pa...
Article
Full-text available
Surprisingly little information is available about the behavior of newborn mammals in the functionally vital context of suckling. We have previously reported notable differences in the pattern of nipple use by kittens of the domestic cat and puppies of the domestic dog. Whereas kittens rapidly develop a "teat order," with each individual using prin...
Article
Full-text available
p>The introduction of animals into school classrooms has been posited as a beneficial intervention for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Whilst evidence that animal-assisted interventions or activities can positively influence classroom behaviour and learning outcomes is emerging, little is known about the experiences and attitudes o...
Article
Full-text available
Adequate sleep is fundamental to workplace performance. For volunteer firefighters who work in safety critical roles, poor performance at work can be life threatening. Extended shifts and sleeping conditions negatively impact sleep during multi-day fire suppression campaigns. Having sleep disordered breathing (SDB) could contribute further to sleep...
Article
Full-text available
Under controlled laboratory conditions, neurobehavioral assays such as the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) are sensitive to increasing levels of fatigue, and in general, tend to correlate with subjective ratings. However, laboratory studies specifically curtail physical activity, potentially limiting the applicability of such findings to field set...
Article
The widespread tendency of modern-day pet owners to self-identify with their companion animals psychologically, symbolically and relationally demonstrates how the constructed identities of animal and owner are strongly linked. This becomes particularly apparent during natural disasters. In this review, the new concept of the pet-owning self is disc...
Article
Wildland firefighting exposes personnel to combinations of occupational and environmental stressors that include physical activity, heat and sleep restriction. However, the effects of these stressors on sleep have rarely been studied in the laboratory, and direct comparisons to field scenarios remain problematic. The aim of this study was to examin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During disasters, companion animals are an identified risk for evacuation failure or premature return. Australian fire services encourage householders to develop a written bushfire action plan that includes pets and animals. The advice given to horse guardians is preemptive relocation at least the day before a forecast catastrophic fire day. The ai...
Article
Background Humanitarian migrants experience higher rates of mental illness than the resident population, limiting their social and economic opportunities and contributions. Effective interventions are thus critical to improve the settlement outcomes. Many therapists employ narrative and expressive therapies because of their holistic approach to bot...
Article
Full-text available
Diverting food waste away from landfills is one way to minimise its serious environmental impact. Given that over a third of Australian households have at least one pet, the feeding of food waste to dogs constitutes one potentially significant waste diversion path. However, the proportion of dog owners that feed food waste to their pets is unknown....
Article
The influence of human–animal relationships upon owners' perceptions and behaviours can lead to situations that place owners and animals at risk of harm. Pet ownership particularly is considered a risk factor for unsafe responses to natural hazards, though conversely, it can also be viewed as a protective factor that motivates disaster preparedness...
Article
Full-text available
As pet ownership influences responses to the threat of bushfire, current preparedness communication acknowledges the pet-owner relationship as a key reason for including pets in emergency plans. However, not all pet-owner relationships are the same. Some people are physically and emotionally ‘closer’ to their pets than are others, a difference that...
Presentation
Full-text available
Although there is a growing recognition of the importance of including animals in disaster planning, there is limited research that specifically focusses on the diverse range of response organisations and stakeholders who are involved in the management of animals and their owners in disasters. This research presentation will document the findings o...
Article
Full-text available
This paper documents the findings of a comprehensive national survey of Australian response organisations and other relevant stakeholders involved in the management of animals and their owners in emergencies and disasters. The aim of the study was to identify and prioritise the challenges encountered by these organisations in the management of anim...