Bradley C. Congdon

Bradley C. Congdon
James Cook University

PhD

About

105
Publications
31,587
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2,650
Citations
Citations since 2016
40 Research Items
1088 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200

Publications

Publications (105)
Preprint
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Conservation translocations can restore populations and prevent extinction of threatened species. Sourcing adequate genetic diversity is an essential consideration when planning reintroductions, because it influences individual fitness and long-term persistence of populations, yet available populations of threatened species may lack diversity. We e...
Article
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Modelling sexual dimorphism has important implications for understanding the evolution of size relationships among and within organisms. We present a composite model for the regulation and evolution of sex-specific inter-population shell size in a family of herbivorous marine molluscs, the Strombidae. In particular, this model postulates that gene...
Article
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Page 406, Taxonomy, line 6 : The “Seraphsidae Gray, 1853” should read “Seraphsidae Jung, 1974”. The authors thank Aart Dekkers for pointing out this error. Page 425, The type genus for Pseudoterebellinae new subfamily is “Pseudoterebellum new genus” and not “Terebellum Röding, 1798”
Article
Angiosperms have co-evolved with animals over thousands of years leading to an array of mutualistic relationships. Passage of plant seeds through animal intestines leads to an important mutualism providing the animal with food and the plant with seed dispersal and enhanced germination. This phenomenon is well studied in terrestrial angiosperms, but...
Article
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This revision demonstrates that an integrated taxonomic approach to classical taxonomic practice can lead to increased internal cladistic resolution within a clade, including the recognition of new taxa at all nomenclatural levels. In particular, this revision has two aims: 1) to complete an α-taxonomic revision of Seraphsidae (Stromboidea); and 2)...
Article
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In recent decades, multipartite mutualisms involving microorganisms such as fungi have been discovered in associations traditionally thought of as bipartite. Ant-plant mutualisms were long thought to be bipartite despite fungi being noticed in an epiphytic ant-plant over 100 years ago. We sequenced fungal DNA from the three distinct domatium chambe...
Article
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This study provides a checklist of the distribution and relative abundance of Strombidae from the nearshore environment of Green Island, Queensland, Australia. Historical records indicate that this island has not been surveyed for at least half a century. We used an opportunistic sighting survey method, where we walked the path of the receding tida...
Article
The Dugong dugon (dugong) and Chelonia mydas (green sea turtle) are economically and culturally significant marine mega-herbivores whose populations are declining globally. Capture of these animals for study is challenging and stressful for the animals. Ecological questions can be answered using faeces, which can be collected floating on the water’...
Article
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Many valid species can hide buried within prior taxonomic revisions. These need to be examined before the taxonomist embarks on the challenging task of naming new taxa. In this study we reexamine the synonyms complied by Abbott (1960) under Canarium urceus (Linné, 1758), examining each taxon for morphological clarity and distinctiveness. After cons...
Article
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The Great Barrier Reef is an iconic ecosystem, known globally for its rich marine biodiversity that includes many thousands of tropical breeding seabirds. Despite indications of localised declines in some seabird species from as early as the mid-1990s, trends in seabird populations across the Reef have never been quantified. With a long history of...
Article
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The resurrection of essentialist arguments, in the context of the modern evolutionary synthesis, highlights the need for a break from historical definitions of 'kind' and 'essence' in order to bring a new paradigm in which these terms are used to conceptualise and understand evolutionary processes. The definition of 'essence' is herein divided into...
Article
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The phylogeny of the American Strombidae the genus Lobatus is limited to the extant Lobatus raninus and several fossil precursors, the genera Macrostrombus, Aliger and Titanostrombus are re-installed as valid genera. The genus Persististrombus which was used as a sink for a plethora of species, is limited to the extant Persististrombus granulatus,...
Article
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The wedge-tailed shearwater (WTS) population of New Caledonia is one of the largest in the world, yet its biology and foraging ecology are poorly known. We studied WTS from 4 colonies in New Caledonia. We examined foraging behaviour and habitats using GPS receivers and light sensors during and outside the breeding season, respectively, and compared...
Article
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Speciation as a consequence of lineage reticulation is not uncommon. A taxonomic and nomenclatural issue arises when a putative hybrid becomes established and is, therefore, in contention for species recognition. While giving a unique name to a hybrid may be acceptable under the codes that govern nomenclature, this does not address issue of whether...
Article
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This paper defines a new crown clade Neostromboidea to separate the Strombidae, Rostellariidae, and Seraphsidae from their sister families Struthiolariidae and Aporrhaidae. There is significant value to understanding evolutionary processes within Stromboidea to recognise the universal similarity in the position of the eye on the end of peduncles an...
Article
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Mycorrhizal fungi are very diverse, including those that produce truffle-like fruiting bodies. Truffle-like fungi are hypogeous and sequestrate (produced below-ground, with an enclosed hymenophore) and rely on animal consumption, mainly by mammals, for spore dispersal. This dependence links mycophagous mammals to mycorrhizal diversity and, assuming...
Preprint
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A new species of Terebellum is published in Visaya. We present a proof print of the plate issued with the description.
Article
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A new species of Seraphsidae Gray, 1853 , Terebellum simoni n.sp. is described from the Phillipines
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A new species of Serapsidae Gray, 1853 , Terebellum simoni n.sp. is described from the Philippines based on conchological differences with T. terebellum (Linnaeus, 1758) and especially the recently described T. hubrechti Poppe & Tagaro, 2016
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Zootaxa 4555 (4): 491-506 https://www.mapress.com/j/zt/ Article 491 https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4555.4.2 http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank. Abstract Here we evaluate the taxonomy of the marine gastropod genus Laevistrombus Abbott, 1960 and determine that there are five extant species within this genus, three of which occur in the southwest P...
Article
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There has been confusion on the status of Terebellum delicatum Kuroda & Kawamoto in Kawamoto & Tanabe 1956, which has often erroneously been referred to as a colour form of Terebellum terebellum Linné 1758. The taxon T. delicatum is revised, giving precision regarding authorship, and a translation of the original Japanese description with a further...
Article
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The Paraseraphs Jung 1974 is an extinct group of gastropods that existed during the Late Paleocene and Eocene of Europe and the Caribbean. P. cantamessae sp. nov. is described; it differs structurally from its sympatric sister taxon and spatiotemporally from other members of the clade.
Article
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Foraging with tuna is a well-documented seabird strategy, referred to as facilitated foraging. However, despite this behaviour being considered almost obligatory in nutrient-poor tropical waters, little data exist on its relative importance to individual colonies. Therefore, to examine facilitated foraging under different patterns of nutrient avail...
Article
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The impacts of free-roaming canids (domestic and wild) on public health have long been a concern in Australian Indigenous communities. We investigated the prevalence of zoonotic helminth diseases in dogs and sympatric dingoes, and used radio telemetry to measure their spatial overlap, in an Aboriginal community in the Wet Tropics of Australia. Samp...
Article
Organisms that are highly connected in food webs often perform unique and vital functions within ecosystems. Understanding the unique ecological roles played by highly connected organisms and the consequences of their loss requires a comprehensive understanding of the functional redundancy among organisms. One important, yet poorly understood, food...
Article
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Sexual segregation in the behaviour, morphology or physiology of breeding seabirds can be related to divergent parental roles, foraging niche partitioning or sex-specific nutritional requirements. Here, we combine GPS tracking, dietary and nutritional analysis to investigate sex-specific foraging of Brown Boobies breeding on Raine Island, Great Bar...
Article
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ABSTRACT: Wedge-tailed shearwaters of Australia’s southern Great Barrier Reef (GBR), obtain food for their chicks on short-trips adjacent to the breeding colony. GPS tracking (Feb-Apr 2013-14) indicated that most trips were of one-day duration (70-85%) and that all were within 300km of the colony. Oceanographic characteristics of foraging and non-f...
Conference Paper
Adequate conservation and management of remote oceanic food resources is only possible with accurate knowledge of important foraging locations and the mechanisms that enhance food availability at these sites. Pelagic foraging seabirds are ideal models to identify and characterize processes or features important to many top predators. Compared with...
Article
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In Australia, dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) have been implicated in the decline and extinction of a number of vertebrate species. The lowland Wet Tropics of Queensland, Australia is a biologically rich area with many species of rainforest-restricted vertebrates that could be threatened by dingoes; however, the ecological impacts of dingoes in this re...
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A new species of Mitridae, Domiporta valdacantamessae, is described from Dingo Beach, Queensland, Australia. The shell shows similarities with other Queensland Domiporta species: D. and D. praestantissima Röding 1798, however the new species can be differentiated based on the clathrate micro-sculpture. At present, this species is only known from Qu...
Article
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Terrestrial plants use an array of animals as vectors for dispersal, however little is known of biotic dispersal of marine angiosperms such as seagrasses. Our study in the Great Barrier Reef confirms for the first time that dugongs (Dugong dugon) and green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) assist seagrass dispersal. We demonstrate that these marine mega...
Article
Hypogeous sequestrate (truffle-like) fungi rely primarily on consumption by mammals for dispersal. Most truffle-like fungi are ectomycorrhizal, making mammalian dispersers essential to the maintenance of plant-fungal relationships, soil fungal diversity and ecosystem functioning. Australia has the highest current global rate of mammalian extinction...
Article
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In general, sex-ratios in herbivorous gastropods show a strong female bias, particularly in the family Strombidae of the Indo-Pacific. Previous studies of Indo-Pacific strombs point to an underlying female bias in most species. However, the full spatial extent and potential mechanisms driving this phenomenon are currently unknown. Therefore, we s...
Article
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The data reported here support the manuscript Nuske et al. [1]. Searches were made for quantitative data on the occurrence of fungi within dietary studies of Australian mammal species. The original location reported in each study was used as the lowest grouping variable within the dataset. To standardise the data and compare dispersal events from p...
Article
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Ancylostoma ceylanicum is the common hookworm of domestic dogs and cats throughout Asia, and is an emerging but little understood public health risk in tropical northern Australia. We investigated the prevalence of A. ceylanicum in soil and free-ranging domestic dogs at six rainforest locations in Far North Queensland that are Indigenous Australian...
Article
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Dingoes (Canis dingo) in the coastal lowlands of Australia's Wet Tropics are perceived as a major threat to biodiversity and subjected to broad-spectrum lethal control. However, evidence of their impacts is equivocal, and control programmes generally ignore the ecological benefits that dingoes might provide. Previous diet analysis has shown that di...
Article
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A new species of Vasticardium from tropical Queensland, Australia, is described based on morphological differences with known taxa from that region. The new species differs in having acute ribs, a character it shares only with Vasticardium angulata Lamarck, 1819, which typically has coarser ribbing and which lacks colour within the shell interior.
Article
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Dugongs (Dugong dugon) are listed as vulnerable to extinction due to rapid population reductions caused in part by loss of seagrass feeding meadows. Understanding dugong feeding behaviour in tropical Australia, where the majority of dugongs live, will assist conservation strategies. We examined whether feeding patterns in intertidal seagrass meadow...
Article
Full-text available
Declining prey availability drives many seabirds to migrate following breeding. While long-distance, latitudinal migrations are common in temperate-breeding species (including temperate-breeding Procellariiformes), regional dispersal or longitudinal migration is more common in tropical-breeding species. We used geolocators to track adult, tropical-...
Conference Paper
Wedge-tailed shearwaters of the Great Barrier Reef were tracked with GPS during three breeding seasons to identify feeding ground locations. During chick-rearing, adults used only near-colony foraging grounds (<300km) to provision chicks mostly on single-day trips. Near-colony site-use was fairly consistent among years but varied among individuals....
Article
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To determine whether breeding tropical shearwaters use “at-distance” locations during the long-trip phase of their bimodal foraging cycle, we deployed PTT satellite tracking devices on adult Wedge-tailed Shearwaters Ardenna pacifica of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, over three breeding seasons. During the long-trip phase (8–14 d), a compo...
Article
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– At-sea movements of wedge-tail shearwaters from Temrock (New Caledonia): mission report, 28 November – 08 December 2014. We aimed at determining the wintering area of the wedge-tailed shearwaters from the Temrock colony in New Caledonia. The specific objective of the mission was the recovery of thirty geo-localizers (GLS) which were fitted to rep...
Article
The Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011 released significant amounts of radionuclides into the marine environment. Exposure to radiation reduces levels of antioxidants such as carotenoids and vitamins A and E within exposed individuals. Such reductions can cause teratogenic or mutagenetic effects leading to reduced reproductive viability and fitness...
Article
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Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) annually undertake the longest migrations between seasonal feeding and breeding grounds of any mammal. Despite this dispersal potential, discontinuous seasonal distributions and migratory patterns suggest that humpbacks form discrete regional populations within each ocean. To better understand the worldwide...
Article
Many sit‐and‐wait predators use conspicuous displays of color to attract prey. These displays sometimes express discrete polymorphisms; however, the adaptive drivers of such variation are not well understood. Here, we explore a previously unknown color polymorphism in the orb‐web spider Gasteracantha fornicata. We discovered that in North Queenslan...
Article
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Previously we have demonstrated that prey availability to seabirds of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) decreases in direct association with within-season increases in sea-surface temperature, independent of prevailing El Nino conditions. These negative impacts occur throughout the GBR and affect multiple seabird species. Currently, the oceanic processe...
Article
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Mechanisms of population divergence in seabirds are poorly understood. We evaluated whether divergent patterns of chick development among wedge-tailed shearwater Puffinus pacificus populations are facultative responses to short-term fluctuations in food availability, or fixed colony-specific phenomena potentially associated with differences in loca...
Article
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The use of a multidisciplinary approach is becoming increasingly important when developing management strategies that mitigate the economic and biological costs associated with invasive pests. A framework of simulated dispersal is combined with life-history information and analyses of population genetic structure to investigate the invasion dynamic...
Article
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Context The west coast of the Cape York Peninsula (CYP) is a major nesting ground for three species of threatened marine turtle, namely, the flatback (Natator depressus), olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and hawksbill (Eretemochelys imbricata). Marine turtle nests in this area experience high rates of depredation and unpublished data from numer...
Article
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delays female senescence in a medium sized marsupial: The effects of maternal traits on annual fecundity in the northern brown bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus)a ec_2279 1..10 Abstract The degree to which females allocate resources between current reproduction, future fecundity and survival is a central theme in life history theory. We investigated two...
Article
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Across three tropical Australian sclerophyll forest types, site-specific environmental variables could explain the distribution of both quantity (abundance and biomass) and richness (genus and species) of hypogeous fungi sporocarps. Quantity was significantly higher in the Allocasuarina forest sites that had high soil nitrogen but low phosphorous....
Article
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Whether or not songbirds recognise geographical variation in song is thought to depend on the perception of threat of neighbours versus strangers or the geographical scale at which song changes in relation to an individual’s dispersal distance, or both of these combined. We aimed to test the perception of different song-variants in the Chowchilla (...
Article
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Although there is growing evidence of climate warming, for many regions the broader effects of climate variation on marine top predators remains unknown owing to the difficulty in obtaining, for synthesis, long-term and short-term datasets on multiple species. In the Australian region, climatic and oceanographic variability and change have been sho...
Article
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1. The identification of dispersal mechanisms which facilitate particular biological invasions is paramount for the successful management of invasive species. If the dispersal mechanism promotes high propagule pressure, the probability of successful establishment and spread is enhanced. 2. Invasive species may enter mainland Australia from Papua Ne...
Article
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Behavioral and/or developmental plasticity is crucial for resisting the impacts of environmental stressors. We investigated the plasticity of adult foraging behavior and chick development in an offshore foraging seabird, the black noddy (Anous minutus), during two breeding seasons. The first season had anomalously high sea-surface temperatures and...
Article
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The island sugarcane planthopper, Eumetopina flavipes Muir, is the only known vector for Ramu stunt disease of sugarcane. This study examined the relationship between host plant distribution and abundance, and E. flavipes distribution, abundance and levels of population connectivity in Papua New Guinea (PNG), the Torres Strait (TS) and northern pen...