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Bradford Connatser

Bradford Connatser
EPRI · Power Quality

About

7
Publications
191
Reads
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53
Citations
Citations since 2016
0 Research Items
13 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022012345

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
A common aphorism in the halls of education is that the writing skills of Americans decline over time. Compared to the "golden age of letters," so the argument goes, each subsequent generation of writers is worse than the last. Although contemporary readers and educators commiserate over encounters with bad writing, a fair comparison of 18th centur...
Article
Technical writers and editors are beset with rules. As authoritative as they are, published style guides such as The Chicago manual of style, MLA, APA, and Gregg do not address reading theory but hang their prescriptions on the flimsy mantle of tradition. This article challenges some putative rules of grammar and mechanics in an effort to improve t...
Article
Some reading researchers and technical communicators assume the efficacy of readability formulas. Reading researchers use such formulas to equalize the reading difficulty of texts used in experiments. Results of an informal Internet survey indicate that some professional writers and editors use readability formulas that are integrated into word-pro...
Article
When people read silently, they unconsciously translate what they read into a speech-like code that facilitates word identification and the creation of meaning, especially when they read scientific and technical texts. Many studies have explored how this "silent speech" affects the reading process. As a follow-up to a previous article about applyin...
Article
When people read silently, they unconsciously translate what they read into a speech-like code that facilitates word identification and the creation of meaning. This article examines that phenomenon - known as silent speech - based upon the published research of cognitive psychologists and psycho-linguists. The author develops a phonological model...

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