Brad Gobby

Brad Gobby
Curtin University · School of Education

Doctor of Philosophy

About

28
Publications
41,242
Reads
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255
Citations
Citations since 2016
23 Research Items
245 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220204060

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
The launch of the Independent Public Schools (IPS) programme in Western Australia (WA) in 2010 reflects the neoliberal policy discourse of decentralisation and school self-management sweeping across many of the world’s education systems. IPS provides WA state school principals with decision-making authority in a range of areas, including the employ...
Article
The Australian Federal and state governments have been introducing neoliberal reforms to the governance of their education systems for a number of decades. One of the most recent programs of reform is the Western Australian Independent Public Schools (IPS) initiative. Similar to decentralizing reforms around the world, the IPS program seeks greater...
Article
Full-text available
This paper argues neoliberal programs of government in education are equipping parents for calculativeness. Regimes of testing and the publication of these results and other organizational data are contributing to a public economy of numbers that increasingly oblige citizens to calculate. Using the notions of calculative and market devices, this pa...
Article
Onrushing ecological precarity and collapse disproportionately affects particular humans and their common worlds. This article proposes that in the face of the myriad crises the Earth is experiencing, and the uneven distribution of their effects, extending conceptions of justice in education beyond the human is crucial. This, however, requires honi...
Article
Full-text available
Across the globe school autonomy reforms have been criticised for opening up public assets to various dangers or risks, from misappropriation of public monies by private sponsors to secretive governance structures maintained by homophilic groups. While these risks are not the exclusive product of school autonomy reforms, they are an endemic feature...
Article
In response to the diverse deployments of ‘school autonomy’ in interviews with education stakeholders, we use material semiotics and the concept of ontological politics to theorize school autonomy as ontologically multiple. We analyze interviews conducted in Australia with forty-two school education stakeholders drawn from principal, parent and tea...
Article
A persuasive solution for governments and systemic authorities seeking to improve the quality and equity of outcomes for students has been the localized management of schools. Believed to provide opportunities for context-sensitive decision-making, what remains unclear is how does shifting increasing management to the school-level generate the type...
Article
Neoliberal policies promoting school autonomy reform in Australia and internationally have, over three decades, appropriated earlier social democratic discourses of parental participation and partnership in school governance. Recent school autonomy reforms have repositioned school council/boards within a narrow frame of accountability and managemen...
Article
This article explores ways pre-service teachers learn to work upon their positive emotional conduct during an initial teacher education course. The article argues that education practice today promotes the acting out of positive emotions, creating conditions within which pre-service teachers ethically shape their emotional conduct. Utilising Foucau...
Poster
Full-text available
Education Policy Futures (EPF) is a non-affiliated, independent, global forum dedicated to fostering knowledge exchange and collaboration among educators and researchers interested in the geopolitics of education policy futures. EPF is critical of accounts that either overestimate the coherence of political programmes or reduce change to a residu...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines principals’ perceptions of school autonomy and leadership as part of a 3-year research project looking at the implications of school autonomy on social justice across four states of Australia (Victoria, New South Wales, Western Australia and Queensland). Drawing on interviews with principals and representatives from principal st...
Article
This paper provides an overview of the policies of school autonomy in Australian public education from the Karmel report in 1973 to the present day. The key focus is on the social justice implications of this reform. It tracks the tensions between policy moves to both grant schools greater autonomy and rein in this autonomy with the increasing inst...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter critically analyses the relationship between educational leadership and governance through an examination of key trends in global education reform. Through adopting two perspectives of governance as ‘instrumental-rational’ and ‘agonistic-political’, we demonstrate how governance can be used to enrich studies of educational leadership,...
Article
Full-text available
The Earth is in the midst of a recent acceleration in the rate of species extinction and the unravelling of ecological communities. The authors think with the emerging field of Extinction Studies to explore educational approaches to ecological endangerment and extinction. Using a notion of visiting as ‘curious practice’, we story encounters between...
Article
Full-text available
There remains strong political support for school autonomy reform within Australian public education despite evidence linking this reform to exacerbating school and systemic inequities. This paper presents interview data from key education stakeholders gathered from a broader study that is investigating the social justice implications of school aut...
Article
Full-text available
The current COVID19 pandemic has forced major adjustments, often at short notice, on schools and schooling. Educators have been working in a constantly changing environment to continue to deliver for students, families and communities all the while maintaining the necessary supports for themselves and colleagues. In Australia this has led to debate...
Article
Full-text available
School autonomy policies have circulated through various modes of educational governance internationally, endorsing the view that more autonomy will improve schools and their systems. When subject to the discourses and practices of marketization, however, school ‘autonomy’ has been mobilized in ways that generate injustice. These injustices are the...
Article
The impact of neoliberal reforms of education systems on the work of teachers and school leaders, particularly in relation to high-stakes accountability frameworks, has been extensively studied in recent decades. One significant aspect of neoliberal schooling is the emergence of quasi-autonomous public schools (such as Academies in England, Charter...
Article
Full-text available
The public education systems of many countries have undergone governance reforms involving administrative decentralisation, corporatisation and community ‘empowerment’. In this paper, we examine the significance of local participation and partnerships in the context of public school autonomy and their corporatisation. Focusing specifically on the u...
Article
Full-text available
The influence of New Public Management (NPM) on public sector organisation is nowhere more evident or pervasive than in the field of school governance where political actors, school leaders and governors are called upon to make the internal operation of the school more transparent and accountable to others through the explicitness of performance in...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines conceptions of governance and freedom embedded within a new school autonomy policy in Queensland (Australia). Drawing on interview data from case study research, it foregrounds the practices of two school leaders from a secondary school in regional Queensland. It considers how such conceptions foster an entrepreneurial leadershi...
Article
Discourses promoting the benefits of school autonomy have floated freely internationally since moves in the 1980s to greater devolution in the UK, New Zealand, the USA, Australia and Sweden. The most recent Australian version, Independent Public Schools (IPS), grants school leaders more latitude over aspects of their work. But this autonomy is cons...
Article
Full-text available
In 2009, the Australian states and territories signed an agreement to provide 15 hours per week of universal access to quality early education to all children in Australia in the year before they enter school. Taking on board the international evidence about the importance of early education, the Commonwealth government made a considerable investme...
Article
Full-text available
The Independent Public Schools (IPS) program began to be implemented in some Western Australian schools in 2010. The IPS program devolves a number of responsibilities to principals and is part of the political objective of removing the constraints of the education bureaucracy by fostering school level decision-making, problem-solving and innovation...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Education Policy Futures (EPF) is a non-affiliated, independent, global forum dedicated to fostering knowledge exchange and collaboration among educators and researchers interested in the geopolitics of education policy futures. EPF is critical of accounts that either overestimate the coherence of political programmes or reduce change to a residual effect of undifferentiated power structures and relations, including global hegemonic projects and governmental rationalities. Instead, EPF encourages debates on the intensity and fragility of education policy futures as assemblages of various conditions, projects, actors, and materials. EPF therefore is philosophically and strategically committed to non-reductionist, post-positivist analyses and methodologies that capture the contestability and revisability of education policy futures. Relatedly, EPF advocates for progressive social change leading to more radical and equitable forms of education around the globe. To this end, EPF encourages, where possible, practical use of theory as vantage points through which to reimagine and transform education policy futures. EPF is open to anyone with similar research interests and commitments. EPF aims to host 3-4 seminars each year. To join the members list, participate in events and stay updated on any developments related to EPF, please email Andrew Wilkins (andrew.wilkins@gold.ac.uk) Follow us on twitter @EPFutures