Bonnie J. E. Myers

Bonnie J. E. Myers
North Carolina State University | NCSU

PhD Candidate

About

14
Publications
4,348
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375
Citations
Introduction
I'm currently working on my PhD under Dr. Tom Kwak at NC State University in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation. My research focuses on biotic resistance and resilience of native and non-native fish in Puerto Rico to extreme events and quantifying the value of freshwater resources to Puerto Rico communities and fisheries. I also work with the U.S.Geological Survey National Climate Adaptation Science Center supporting global climate change and fisheries synthesis efforts.

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Climate change will continue to be an important consideration for conservation practitioners. However, uncertainty in identifying appropriate management strategies, particularly for understudied species and regions, constrains the implementation of science‐based solutions and adaptation strategies. Here, we share a decision‐path approach to reduce...
Article
Models help decision-makers anticipate the consequences of policies for ecosystems and people; for instance, improving our ability to represent interactions between human activities and ecological systems is essential to identify pathways to meet the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. However, use of modeling outputs in decision-making remains unc...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change poses an increasing threat to achieving development goals and is often considered in development plans and project designs. However, there have been challenges in the effective implementation of those plans, particularly in the sustained engagement of the communities to undertake adaptive actions, but also due to insufficient scienti...
Article
Inland recreational fishing, defined as primarily leisure‐driven fishing in freshwaters, is a popular pastime in the USA. State natural resource agencies endeavor to provide high‐quality and sustainable fishing opportunities for anglers. Managers often use creel and other angler survey data to inform state‐ and waterbody‐level management efforts. D...
Article
Biodiversity projections with uncertainty estimates under different climate, land-use, and policy scenarios are essential to setting and achieving international targets to mitigate biodiversity loss. Evaluating and improving biodiversity predictions to better inform policy decisions remains a central conservation goal and challenge. A comprehensive...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Ecological relationships between species richness and biomass production are increasingly thought to be pervasive across the globe. Yet, diversity–production relationships have not been explored extensively for freshwater fish communities even though fisheries production provides key services to humans. Our aim was to evaluate the diversity–pro...
Chapter
a.Aim: To demonstrate the societal values of inland fishes through nine services provided by inland fishes. Each service is defined, key stakeholders identified, and threats enumerated. Diverse case studies (geography, taxonomy, fishery-type) provide examples to highlight the societal values around the world. b.Main concepts: Nine societal services...
Article
Full-text available
Inland fishes provide important ecosystem services to communities worldwide and are especially vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Fish respond to climate change in diverse and nuanced ways, which creates challenges for practitioners of fish conservation, climate change adaptation, and management. Although climate change is known to affect...
Article
The United Nations’ (UN) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development defines the formidable challenge of integrating historically separate economic, social, and environmental goals into a unified ‘plan of action for people, planet, and prosperity.’ We highlight the substantial contribution inland fisheries can make towards preventing increased poverty...
Article
Full-text available
Although climate change is an important factor affecting inland fishes globally, a comprehensive review of how climate change has impacted and will continue to impact inland fishes worldwide does not currently exist. We conducted an extensive, systematic primary literature review to identify English-language, peer-reviewed journal publications with...
Article
Full-text available
To date, there are few comprehensive assessments of how climate change affects inland finfish, fisheries, and aquaculture at a global scale, but one is necessary to identify research needs and commonalities across regions and to help guide decision making and funding priorities. Broadly, the consequences of climate change on inland fishes will impa...
Article
Full-text available
Production of biomass is central to the ecology and sustainability of fish assemblages. The goal of this study was to empirically estimate and compare fish assemblage production, production-to-biomass (P/B) ratios and species composition for 25 second- to third-order streams spanning the Appalachian Mountains (from Vermont to North Carolina) that v...
Article
Full-text available
Climate is a critical driver of many fish populations, assemblages, and aquatic communities. However, direct observational studies of climate change impacts on North American inland fishes are rare. In this synthesis, we (1) summarize climate trends that may influence North American inland fish populations and assemblages, (2) compile 31 peer-revie...
Chapter
Full-text available
Many Appalachian streams historically dominated by Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis have experienced shifts towards fish communities dominated by Rainbow Trout Onchorhynchus mykiss. We used empirical estimates of biomass and secondary production of trout conspecifics to evaluate species success under varied thermal regimes. Trout populations were...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Increasing temperatures and decreasing precipitation threaten the persistence of the Rio Grande cutthroat trout, the southernmost subspecies of cutthroat trout, found only in parts of New Mexico and Colorado. This subspecies appears to be more vulnerable to drought than more northern subspecies, because it occupies small and fragmented streams which are at greater risk of drying up during drought. Most notably, in 2002 drought in the Southwest resulted in the loss of 14 different Rio Grande cutthroat trout populations – about 10% of the total population. While it is known that drought is having an effect on Rio Grande cutthroat trout, the specific ways in which individuals and populations are affected by drought remains unclear. In light of worsening drought conditions in the Southwest, the need to identify the specific impacts of drought on the Rio Grande cutthroat trout is only increasing. This project is examining the effects of reduced stream flow and higher stream temperature on Rio Grande cutthroat trout to identify how factors such as the survival of individual fish and the growth rates of entire populations may be changing. Once these effects have been identified, researchers will model the long-term survival of the subspecies under predicted future drought conditions.
Project
Marine and inland fisheries provide substantial economic, nutritional, recreational, and cultural benefits to human populations globally. Though extensive research and management efforts exist to ensure the sustainability of these important resources, many fisheries still face threats including climate change, habitat degradation, and overfishing. The inland fisheries community often cites that less attention is given to inland fisheries compared to marine but, to date, no quantitative analysis has examined these differences. Our goal is to compare investment and resources allocated to the research and management of marine and inland fisheries relative to their value at a global scale. Through the development of an ecosystem services framework, we determine the cost versus benefits of inland fisheries management and conservation to the economy compared to marine fisheries. Through collecting information on direct government investment, including staffing levels for marine and inland fisheries management, we examine the extent to which governments invest in inland and marine management efforts. Lastly, we use case studies from specific countries to highlight at a finer scale investment relative to value of inland and marine fisheries. Effective resource allocation is essential to managing and conserving inland and marine fisheries relative to their value to society. Having a clear understanding of the current investment into these resources globally can assist policy makers by providing a more in-depth understanding of the value and associated investment for fisheries, which are especially important under the increasing threat of climate change on these important resources.