Bonginkosi Shozi

Bonginkosi Shozi
University of California, San Diego | UCSD · Institute for Practical Ethics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
1,949
Reads
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42
Citations
Citations since 2017
23 Research Items
42 Citations
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Introduction
Currently a postdoc at UC San Diego's Institute for Practical Ethics. Recently completed my PhD in Law at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. My thesis provided an African perspective on various legal and ethical issues relating to heritable human genome editing. Research interests include Constitutional Law and Human Rights, Reproductive Rights and the use of New Reproductive Technologies, Medical Law, Bioethics in the use of Biotechnology, Access to Medicines and Intellectual Property.
Additional affiliations
October 2021 - present
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Honorary Research Fellow affiliated with the Health Law and Ethics Research Interesting Group

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports the results of a public engagement study on heritable human genome editing (HHGE) carried out in South Africa, which was conducted in accordance with a study protocol that was published in this journal in 2021. This study is novel as it is the first public engagement study on HHGE in Africa. It used a deliberative public engageme...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides a comprehensive analysis of the various dimensions in South African law applicable to personal genomic sequence data. This analysis includes property rights, personality rights, and intellectual property rights. Importantly, the under-investigated question of whether personal genomic sequence data are capable of being owned is...
Article
Full-text available
The recent case of QG v CS (32200/2020) 2021 ZAGPPHC 366 (17 June 2021) concerns a sperm donor who applied to the court for parental responsibilities and rights in respect of a child conceived with his sperm. This is despite the fact that he had concluded a written agreement with the child’s legal parents before the child’s conception which stipula...
Article
Full-text available
The Doha Declaration’s twentieth anniversary in November 2021 has taken place in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. The experience of the past two years has demonstrated that the very factors that necessitated the Declaration—the problems of inequitable access to medicines and other health technologies for the world’s poor—continue to plague us. H...
Article
Full-text available
South African (SA) gamete banks and gamete donation agencies do not offer open-identity donors, as it is generally believed that donor anonymity is a legal requirement in SA. However, analysis of SA statutory instruments and case law shows that this belief is mistaken, and that gamete donation in SA can be anywhere on the spectrum between anonymous...
Article
Medies-geassisteerde voortplanting in Suid-Afrika word tans gereguleer deur regulasies wat in 2012 gepromulgeer is ingevolge die Nasionale Gesondheidswet 61 van 2003. In Maart 2021 het die minister van Gesondheid nuwe konsepregulasies gepubliseer vir kommentaar. Hierdie artikel ontleed die nuwe konsepregulasies teen die agtergrond van groeiende reg...
Article
Full-text available
The global discourse on heritable genome editing is dominated by Western perspectives. A broadening of this discourse is advocated. A South African perspective on heritable genome editing is provided, focusing on differences in culture and context , which illustrates the need for a governance approach to heritable genome editing that is distinctly...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past few years, developments in the science of precise editing of human genomes using CRISPR-Cas9 have led many countries that lack specific laws in this area, such as South Africa (SA), to contemplate legal reform. Thaldar et al. recently published five principles to guide legal reform in SA on heritable genome editing. In a similar vein,...
Article
Full-text available
Whether human biological material (‘HBM’) in the research context is susceptible of ownership is contested, yet under-investigated. This situation leads to legal uncertainty for local scientists and their international collaborators. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the topic — investigating both common law and statutory law — and...
Article
Full-text available
The paper explores the unique approaches to IP protection in the countries belonging to the Organisation Africaine de la Propriété Intellectuelle/African Intellectual Property Organization (OAPI) and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) regions; the limited extent to which legal and policy frameworks with regard to TRIPS flexibilities have been...
Article
Full-text available
This article outlines the protocol for a prospective study for virtual deliberative public engagement on heritable genome editing in humans. The study intends to create a platform for a diverse group of 25–30 South Africans to engage with a facilitator and each other on 15 policy questions regarding heritable genome editing, with a focus on: a) the...
Chapter
A complete discussion of the South African law and regulations that governs Human Biological Material.
Article
Full-text available
In only the second case dealing with posthumous conception in South Africa – Ex Parte SN – a woman approached the High Court seeking an urgent order allowing her to have sperm removed from the body of her comatose husband, so that she could use it for reproductive purposes after his death. This raised two separate legal issues: (i) whether gamete r...
Article
Full-text available
Novel therapeutic strategies using genome editing technologies, such as CRISPR-Cas9, are revolutionising the way in which diseases can be prevented and treated in the future. Consequently, a global debate has emerged around the ethical and legal implications relating to the use of such technology in research, therapy, and human reproduction. This h...
Article
Full-text available
WHO in 2019 established the Advisory Committee on Developing Global Standards for Governance and Oversight of Human Genome Editing, which has recently published a Draft Governance Framework on Human Genome Editing. Although the Draft Framework is a good point of departure, there are four areas of concern: first, it does not sufficiently address iss...
Article
Full-text available
In October 2019 the Constitutional Court (CC) handed down judgment in the matter of Ascendis Animal Health (Pty) Limited v Merck Sharpe Dohme Corporation 2020 1 SA 327 (CC). This is its first judgment dealing with the validity of a patent and, as it concerns issues that go the heart of patent law, the judgment potentially has far-reaching implicati...
Article
Full-text available
It has been variously claimed that alterations to the human genome for reproductive purposes ought to be prohibited on the basis that doing so is contrary to human dignity. This claim leads to the conclusion that germline genome editing (GGE) ought to be categorically banned in all states committed to upholding human dignity as a right recognized i...
Article
Full-text available
Human germline editing holds much promise for improving people’s lives, but at the same time this novel biotechnology raises ethical and legal questions. The South African ethics regulatory environment is problematic, as it prohibits all research on, and the clinical application of, human germline editing. By contrast, the South African legal regul...
Article
Full-text available
In the wake of the advent of genome editing technology CRISPR-Cas9, there has been a global debate around the implications of manipulating the human genome. While CRISPR-based germline gene editing is new, the debate about the ethics of gene editing is not – for several decades now, scholars have debated the ethics of making heritable changes to th...
Article
New reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilisation have opened up new avenues for those who wish to have children, and who need no longer be bound by biological limitations to procreation like infertility. However, the choices available to prospective parents have been restricted by the fact that the use of new reproductive technologies i...
Article
Full-text available
If the safety and efficacy issues relating to heritable genome editing can be resolved, how should liberal democratic societies regulate the use of this technology by prospective parents who wish to effect edits to the genomes of their prospective children? We suggest that recent developments in South African law can be useful in this regard. The c...
Article
Full-text available
As we observe the 18th anniversary of the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement (Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) and Public Health, it is appropriate to take stock of intellectual property developments and endeavour to present a comprehensive account of the situation in the African continent in respect of the i...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted more than ever the integral link between the regulation of intellectual property and public health. Intellectual property (IP), while designed to benefit society by incentivising innovation, can both stifle innovation and impede the public good by depriving people of access to much-needed medicines. This project is a collection of paper and research projects which advocate for a regulation of IP which strikes an adequate balance between incentivising innovation and ensuring access to medicines for those who need it, specifically in the African context.
Project
In vitro fertilisation, embryo cryopreservation, pre-implantation genetic screening, and CRISPR. The advent of each of these technologies has led to unprecedented advances in the options available to individuals when choosing to have a child, but also raise a number of ethical concerns which have led to debates about their regulation. In seeking to contribute to these debates, this project investigates a number of human rights issues, such as whether individuals can be said to have a right to access and use novel biotechnology in assisted human reproduction, and if so, to what extent can such rights be limited. This project focuses primarily on the South African context.