Boglarka Erdei

Boglarka Erdei
Hungarian Natural History Museum · Department of Botany

PhD

About

43
Publications
12,598
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921
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
January 1999 - present
Hungarian Natural History Museum
Position
  • museologist

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Winged seeds were recovered from two sites of the late early Miocene (Karpatian) flora of Magyaregregy, Mecsek Mts, W Hungary. The seeds are assigned to the fossil-genus and species, Mecsekispermum gordonioides Hably and Erdei gen. nov. et sp. nov., and are tentatively related to the family Theaceae. Based on the overall character of the winged see...
Article
This paper presents the reinterpretation of the taxonomic position of fossil epiphyllous callimothalloid fungi belonging to the fossil-genera Callimothallus (hitherto classified to the family Microthyriaceae) and Cribrites (?Microthyriales). These fungi thrived from the Late Cretaceous up to the Holocene. Investigation are based on collected materi...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial vegetation patterns potentially reflect coeval continental climate variations which are also impacted by palaeogeographical settings. Plant functional types (PFTs) and their distribution, frequently applied in ecological studies and biome modelling, serve as a tool for reconstructing palaeovegetation units and ultimately tracing palaeoecolo...
Article
Full-text available
The middle Eocene (Lutetian) fossil plant assemblage from Tatabánya (N Hungary) comprises plant remains preserved mostly as impressions. Remains of angiosperms are represented by Lauraceae (Laurophyllum div. sp., Daphnogene Unger), Rhamnaceae (Ziziphus Miller), Malvaceae s.l. (Byttneriopsis Z.Kvaček et Wilde), Leguminosae, and Palmae, and the occur...
Article
Full-text available
The morphology of the early ontogenetic stages of cycad foliage may help resolve the relationships between extinct to extant cycad lineages. However, prior to this study, fossil evidence of cycad seedlings was not known. We describe a compression fossil of cycad eophylls with co-occurring fully developed leaves of adult specimens from the early Pal...
Article
Full-text available
The late Miocene (Pannonian) flora of Pécs-Danitzpuszta was first studied and published by Hably & Sebe (2016). Recent collections, however, revealed additional foliage remains, some also providing epidermal details. A well-preserved leaf fragment assigned to Laurophyllum based on its micromorphology proves the presence of Lauraceae. A frequent ele...
Article
Full-text available
Hazards and disasters have occurred throughout Earth's History and thus the geological record is an important resource for understanding future hazards and disasters and its Impact. The Earth Science Group (ESG) of the Consortium of European Taxonomic Facilities (CETAF) carried out a “Hazard and Disaster Event Survey” to identify Earth Science coll...
Article
Full-text available
Hazards and disasters have occurred throughout Earth's History and thus the geological record is an important resource for understanding future hazards and disasters. The Earth Science Group (ESG) of the Consortium of European Taxonomic Facilities (CETAF) carried ‡ § | ¶ # ¤ «,» ˄ ˅ ‡ ¦ ‡ © Tilley L et al. This is an open access article distributed...
Article
Modern Zamia L. is the second largest genus among cycads, however reliably identified fossil occurrences of the genus have so far been missing. Previously, fossil “Zamia” species were established in large numbers on the basis of macromorphological similarity of foliage fragments to living Zamia species. However, a reinvestigation of specimens assig...
Article
The Miocene is a relatively recent epoch of the Earth’s history with warmer climate than today, particularly during the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO, approximatively 17-15 Ma). Although the cause of the warming is probably not only attributable to CO 2, but also to changes in orography and configuration of ocean gateways, this time interva...
Article
The Pannonian Basin system provides sufficient data to study local and regional vegetation in the context of palaeoclimate and palaeogeography. The present study attempts to make use of latest results in stratigraphy and track vegetation change throughout the late Miocene. Vegetation layers are reconstructed for five time slices, from 10.8 Ma to 6....
Article
Full-text available
The genus Dioon occupies an important phylogenetic position as sister to the other Zamiaceae. However, its epidermal morphology is still poorly known. We employed scanning and transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and light microscopy to examine the epidermal and cuticular morphology of 12 of the 14 currently recognized species of D...
Article
In the course of the groundworks of the 'Környe Industrial Park' near Tatabánya (N Hungary), fossiliferous beds of the Oligocene Mány Formation were exposed. Sediments comprised abundant plant remains with typical Oligocene species, such as “Rhamnus” warthae, Alnus oligocaenica accompanied by elements thriving in humid habitats, e.g. the fern Prone...
Article
Full-text available
Premise of research. Leaves of an extinct kind of cycad are recognized from the middle and late Eocene Clarno Formation of Oregon. Although the pinnately compound leaf is similar in gross form and organization to some other extant and Cenozoic cycads such as Dioon Lindl., Encephalartos Lehm., and Dioonopsis Horiuchi et Kimura, it is readily disting...
Article
Fruit endocarps assigned to Mastixia amygdalaeformis provide the first evidence that mastixioid plants were present in the Pannonian Basin. Fossils were collected from the upper Miocene (Tortonian, regional stratigraphy: Pannonian) deposits of the Rudabánya–Vilmos outcrop which is close to the mammal locality yielding the famous remains of Rudapith...
Article
The Miocene is a relatively recent epoch of the Earth's history with warmer climate than today. The Middle Miocene (Langhian, near 15 Ma) was particularly warm. Although the cause of the warming is presumably not only attributable to CO2, but also to the change in orography and configuration of ocean gateways, this time interval represents an ideal...
Conference Paper
Today an effective Gulf Stream accounts for mild, maritime climate in Western Europe and causes significant longitudinal, climatic anomalies when comparing both sides of the North Atlantic, expressed in differentiated biome patterns. E.g. at ca. 40° northern latitude, evergreen broadleaved sclerophyllous woodland of the Northern Mediterranean corre...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The genus Ceratozamia (Cycadales; Zamiaceae) was classically divided into two groups based on gross leaf morphology, but recent molecular phylogenetic analyses has identified three clades. On a larger scale, Ceratozamia appears closely related to Stangeria and to the neotropical genera Microcycas and Zamia. Whole leaf and isolated cuticle specimens...
Article
Full-text available
This paper concentrates on the Early Oligocene palaeoclimate of the southern part of Eastern and Central Europe and gives a detailed climatological analysis, combined with leaf-morphological studies and modelling of the palaeoatmospheric CO2 level using stomatal and delta C-13 data. Climate data are calculated using the Coexistence Approach for Kis...
Article
Full-text available
Reinvestigation of cycadalean leaf and leaflet remains from the Eocene of Hamilton Bay, Alaska, and La Porte, California, using features of epidermal anatomy as well as macromorphology, indicates that these remains, which were formerly assigned to modern cycad genera, conform to the extinct genus Dioonopsis Horiuchi et Kimura first described from t...
Data
This paper concentrates on the Early Oligocene palaeoclimate of the southern part of Eastern and Central Europe and gives a detailed climatological analysis, combined with leaf-morphological studies and modelling of the palaeoatmospheric CO2 level using stomatal and d13 C data. Climate data are calculated using the Coexistence Approach for Kiscelli...
Article
Full-text available
Fossil cycadalean leaves recorded from the Miocene plant assemblage of Soma, western Turkey, are described and assigned to an extinct genus and species, Pseudodioon akyoli. Leaf macromorphology suggests affinity with members of the Zamiaceae (subfam. Encephalartoideae), particularly with modern Dioon. Micromorphological features on the other hand i...
Article
Full-text available
• Chapter 1. PaleoParks: Our paleontological heritage protected and conserved in the field worldwide • Chapter 2. The Triassic Guanling fossil Group - A key GeoPark • Chapter 3. The GeoPark of Haute-Provence, France - Geology and palaeontology protected for sustainable development • Chapter 4. The protection and use of the geological and paleontolo...
Article
A remarkable fossil assemblage—fifteen 'in situ' stumps standing at their original position—was explored at the opencast lignite mine at Bükkábrány, N Hungary. The stumps occupying an area of about 50 × 100 m have been preserved in Upper Miocene grey sands overlying the lignite seam. The height of the trunks ranges from 2 up to 5.2 m, their perimet...
Article
The Middle Eocene flora of Csordakút (N Hungary) The Middle Eocene fossil plant assemblage from Csordakút (N Hungary) comprises plant remains preserved exclusively as impressions. Algae are represented by abundant remains of Characeae, including both vegetative fragments and gyrogonites. Remains of angiosperms comprise Lauraceae ( Daphnogene sp.),...
Article
Full-text available
A survey of the Neogene flora and vegetation pattern of the Pannonian domain based on selected fossil plant assemblages is given. The paper aims to reveal the complex interrelation of tectonic-palaeogeographic evolution, climate, flora and vegetation development through the Neogene of the Pannonian domain. Flora and vegetation patterns are based on...
Article
In the present study, published Miocene mega- and microfloral records compiled from a total of 92 localities in Western Eurasia are analysed with respect to diversity of different plant functional types (PFTs). To study spatial diversity patterns and their evolution three time-intervals are selected corresponding to the Langhian (16.3–13.6 Ma), the...
Data
A survey of the Neogene flora and vegetation pattern of the Pannonian domain based on 18 selected fossil plant assemblages is given. Flora and vegetation patterns are based on well-documented and studied fossil plant assemblages (macrofloras, primarily leaves). A general but slow cooling trend is definitely observable after the Early Miocene as ref...
Article
Five Late Oligocène fossil plant assemblages from Hungary were subjected to a climate analysis adopting the Coexistence Approach. Four climate variables (mean annual temperature, temperature of the coldest and warmest month, mean annual precipitation) were estimated quantitatively. Resultant limits of values for the variables indicate a warm temper...
Article
Leaf macrofossils of an old collection from Csolnok (Dorog Basin, Hungary) were studied by the authors. Based on the regional lithostratigraphy and few remains of molluscs the grey clayey fossiliferous sediments are of Oligocene age. The preservation of the material allowed cuticular preparation in some of the taxa. In addition to the usually emplo...
Article
Full-text available
During the Tertiary, a thick sedimentary sequence was accumulated in the Bresse Basin, including some lignite that was locally excavated. Although the palynology of this lignite is relatively well known, the fossil plant macroremains were only poorly studied. Well-preserved material from a new Upper Pliocene (Reuverian) outcrop is reported herein....
Article
Vegetation and climate reconstructions are given based on some late Middle Miocene (Sarmatian) fossil floras of Hungary, i.e. from the Tokaj Mountains (NE Hungary), Bükk Mountains (NE Hungary) and W Hungary. Except for Sopron-Piusz puszta (coalified dispersed material in deltaic sediments) and Felsotárkány (alluvial sediments), mostly leaf impressi...
Article
 A characteristic xeromorphic foliage occurring in the European Tertiary was originally identified as a Proteaceae according to gross morphology, and compared with Grevillea L. and Lomatia L. (Grevillea kymeana Unger, Lomatites aquensis Saporta). On the basis of venation patterns and phyllotaxy, these elements are now reinterpreted as extinct speci...
Article
Full-text available
The oldest, standing fossil forest in the world preserved as wood occurs at Bükkábrány, Hungary. An open-pit mine working Upper Miocene (Pannonian) lignite revealed sixteen stumps, 1.8 to 3.6 m basal diameter, preserved up to 6 m in height, standing on top of the lignite bed. The trees were preserved by the suddenly rising water level of Lake Panno...
Article
Vizsgálatainkkal arra kívántunk választ adni, hogy - a Belső Kárpáti Térség érintett eocén-oligocén flóra-spektruma alapján kimutatható-e florisztikai és klímaváltozás, és milyen minőségűek ezek a változások. Fosszilis flórák taxonómiai feldolgozása alapján az eocén - kora oligocén flórák jelentős florisztikai hasonlóságot mutatnak, a termofil elem...
Article
A Belső Kárpáti Térség és az ezt körülvevő Alp-Kárpát-Dinári térség terrén kollázsa olyan korai oligocén flóramaradványos rétegeket tartalmaz, amelyekek számos információt hordoznak e területek ősföldrajzi kapcsolatára és klímájára vonatkozóan. Vizsgálataink során számos taxonómiai revíziót végeztünk hazai- és érintett külföldi lelőhelyek flóráin....

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Projects (2)
Project
NECLIME is an open international network of scientists working on Cenozoic climate evolution and related changes of continental ecosystems. During the past 65 million years of Earth history, globally warmer-then-present conditions prevailed in a world with almost modern paleogeography. These timespans represent promising case studies for anticipated future scenarios. Within the NECLIME network, we aim to combine data on past climate change and its environmental impact for large-scale reconstructions. NECLIME research activities comprise paleoclimate reconstructions, including atmospheric CO₂ and ecosystem analysis using multiple quantitative methods on various primarily continental proxies (plants; vertebrates; invertebrates; geochemistry and geological proxies). Complementing model studies are employed to assess connections and processes driving ocean, atmosphere and biosphere at global and regional scales. NECLIME was established in 1999 with the aim to understand Neogene trends across Eurasia. This basic idea quickly and constantly expanded to a global interest and a wider stratigaphical frame. The steadily growing NECLIME network with currently around 140 members in 34 countries is coordinated by a team of researchers and an advisory board. NECLIME holds annual conferences and workshops and administers working groups bringing forward scientific exchange, joint projects, and the integration of research data. For more information go to www.neclime.de
Project
My main interest lies on the role of morphology and fossil data to understand the patterns of evolution and diversification in the seed plants. I am currently focusing on the Cycadales, a pivotal group for the understanding of evolution in the seed plants. Their extant diversity includes 341 species assigned to 10 genera. They are distributed in subtropical and tropical regions in both hemispheres with centers of diversity in Mexico and Central America, South Africa and Australia. Until recently, the cycads were considered to be a “living fossils”, which underwent very little evolutionary change since their appearance in the Mid Permian. This contrasts with what emerges from molecular dating analyses, which infer that most of the modern species diversity of the Cycadales originated in the Late Miocene. This has been interpreted as an adaptive radiation in response to aridification or as a recovery from a mass extinction. An obstacle to test such hypotheses is represented by the poor understanding of the fossil record of the cycads, especially the leaf fossil record. Even if cycadalean leaves are present from the late Palaeozoic though the Mesozoic and the Cenozoic, with a reported high diversity, their taxonomy is unclear and their relationships are poorly understood. Assignation to the few fossil genera is usually based on a combination of macromorphological and epidermal characters, but the relative importance of these characters as phylogenetic trackers is not really understood. During my project, I will collect data about leaf morphology and epidermal anatomy for all genera and most species of the extant cycadales, and reevaluate the morphology of the main cycad fossil leaves. I will make use of advanced microscopical techniques, and analyze the data in a phylogenetic and morphospace framework. This will help to resolve the relationships between extant and fossil cycads, and to understand the patterns of evolution of this group through time.