Blaire Dube

Blaire Dube
The Ohio State University | OSU · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

32
Publications
1,745
Reads
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137
Citations
Introduction
Blaire Dube currently works at the Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University. Blaire does research in Neuropsychology, Cognitive Science and Cognitive Psychology. Her most recent publication is 'Distinct prioritization of visual working memory representations for search and for recall'.
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - July 2021
The Ohio State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Our behavioral goals shape how we process information via attentional filters that prioritize goal-relevant information, dictating both where we attend and what we attend to. When something unexpected or salient appears in the environment, it captures our spatial attention. Extensive research has focused on the spatiotemporal aspects of attentional...
Article
Given the complexity of our visual environments, a number of mechanisms help us prioritize goal-consistent visual information. When searching for a friend in a crowd, for instance, visual working memory (VWM) maintains a representation of your target (i.e., your friend’s shirt) so that attention can be subsequently guided toward target-matching fea...
Preprint
In the present study, we examined whether visual working memory (VWM) can support attentional control settings (ACSs) by maintaining representations of the visual properties that should capture attention. Beyond enhancing capture by memory-matching stimuli, can VWM representations suppress capture by non-matching stimuli? In Experiments 1a/b, parti...
Preprint
Although recent evidence suggests that visual short-term memory (VSTM) is a continuous resource, little is known about how flexibly this resource can be allocated. Previous studies using probabilistic cues to indicate two different levels of probe probability have found that response precision can be predicted according to a continuous allocation o...
Article
Probabilistic mixture models have contributed significantly to advancements in visual working memory research in recent decades. In a new paper, Schurgin and colleagues revisit the basic assumptions of mixture models and suggest that we cannot understand memory without first considering perception.
Article
Full-text available
Visual working memory is a brief, capacity-limited store of visual information that is involved in a large number of cognitive functions. To guide one’s behavior effectively, one must efficiently allocate these limited memory resources across memory items. Previous research has suggested that items are either stored in memory or completely blocked...
Preprint
Attention regulates visual working memory (VWM) performance by determining how its resources are distributed among encoded information. During encoding, this process is both flexible and strategic: Resources are unequally allocated to items based on the probability that each will be probed for memory recall. Here we assessed whether VWM resources c...
Preprint
There is a limit to how much information can be stored in visual working memory (VWM). Previous models of this limitation have focused on the effects of VWM load, finding that behavioral recall of memory items becomes worse as load increases. Similarly, ERP studies examining the neural markers of VWM have focused primarily on load effects, explorin...
Preprint
Full-text available
Efficiently allocating capacity-limited cognitive resources is critical to guiding behavior effectively. Although previous research has suggested that distractors are blocked from memory access, recent work proposes a more flexible attentional filter that acts based on item priority. Here, we investigated the electrophysiological correlates of flex...
Presentation
There is a limit to how much information can be stored in visual working memory (VWM). Previous models of this limitation have focused on the effects of VWM load, finding that behavioral recall of memory items becomes worse as load increases. Similarly, ERP studies examining the neural markers of VWM have focused primarily on load effects, explorin...
Article
Prolonged sitting, common in many workplaces, reduces blood flow to the lower limb and has negative health outcomes. CoreChair is an active-sitting chair that encourages increased movement to help mitigate these outcomes. Physiological and cognitive measures were recorded in ten subjects over 4 h of sitting in both the CoreChair and a traditional o...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the inherent limitations of visual working memory (VWM), it effectively supports numerous everyday behaviors − capabilities that are due, in part, to its flexibility. An observer can flexibly prioritize VWM representations to support at least two behavioral outcomes: An item can be prioritized to enhance its representational quality, thereb...
Article
Full-text available
The effective use of our capacity-limited visual working memory (VWM) requires mechanisms that govern how it represents information. Validly cueing an item in VWM after encoding, for instance, enhances memory performance for that item and biases its state in VWM, bringing its representation to an active state such that attentional selection is bias...
Conference Paper
When faced with relevant and irrelevant information, attention can act as a "bouncer in brain", letting in important information while filtering out distractors. However, when all items are relevant, attention may also act as a dial, adjusting the relative priority of each item. For example, it has been demonstrated using feature based attention th...
Poster
Full-text available
When faced with relevant and irrelevant information, attention can act as a “bouncer in brain”, letting in important information while filtering out distractors. It has been found that individuals can prioritize what gets into memory using feature-based attention. The more importance placed upon an item, the more likely and precisely it will be enc...
Article
Across 2 experiments we revisited the filter account of how feature-based attention regulates visual working memory (VWM). Originally drawing from discrete-capacity (“slot”) models, the filter account proposes that attention operates like the “bouncer in the brain,” preventing distracting information from being encoded so that VWM resources are res...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
An active area in attention capture research is to understand the role of priming in establishing attentional control settings (ACSs). When participants repeatedly select target stimuli across trials of an attention task these items are primed in a bottom-up manner, which may cause attention to be preferentially captured by distracting stimuli that...
Conference Paper
When an item is held active in visual working memory (VWM), visually similar information in the environment will capture attention, even if it is task-irrelevant. This capture is commonly measured through the modulation of visual-search distractor costs. Memory-matching distractors slow response times more than unrelated distractors, suggesting tha...
Article
During visual search, visual working memory (VWM) supports the guidance of attention in two ways: It stores the identity of the search target, facilitating the selection of matching stimuli in the search array, and it maintains a record of the distractors processed during search so that they can be inhibited. In two experiments, we investigated whe...
Conference Paper
We use attention to select relevant portions of our environment for detailed processing-a process often directed by feature-based goals. Feature-based attention guides visual information processing by strengthening early representations (i.e., within perceptual cortex). Here we examined how feature-based goals affect the way visual information is r...
Article
Experience is an important factor in developing face recognition ability. Given that extraverts show increased social involvement, extraversion may be associated with greater experience with faces, thereby leading to enhanced face recognition ability. However, extraverts also characteristically display high positive affect - an affective state thou...
Article
Intergroup disgust sensitivity (ITG-DS) reflects an affect-laden revulsion toward out-groups. Previous attempts to weaken its prediction of prejudice have failed. Given that clinical approaches to disgust sensitivity successfully utilize mental imagery, we consider contact simulation interventions. Participants were randomly assigned to control, st...
Article
Faces are widely regarded as "special" due to our reliance on holistic or configural processing for their successful recognition. The processing of low spatial frequency information has been associated with holistic processing and is thought to promote a face-specific recognition advantage. There are reliable individual differences in face recognit...