• Home
  • UNSW Sydney
  • School of Information Systems and Technology Management
  • Blair Wang
Blair Wang

Blair Wang
UNSW Sydney | UNSW · School of Information Systems and Technology Management

Doctor of Philosophy (in progress)

About

7
Publications
8,927
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
84
Citations
Introduction
Blair Wang is a PhD Candidate supervised by academics from UNSW and The University of Sydney. His PhD in Information Systems (topic: Critical Theory Perspectives on Location-Independent Digital Work and Digital Nomadism) is supervised by Prof. Dubravka Cecez-Kecmanovic, Prof. Daniel Schlagwein, and Dr. Michael C. Cahalane.

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
What are the potential futures of knowledge work, given its transformation into almost exclusively digital work during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis? Our ongoing research program on digital nomadism informs a Hegelian dialectical analysis and an envisioning of the future(s) of knowledge work. We contrast the Factory paradigm of work (thesis), exempl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Digital nomadism is a growing phenomenon wherein technology enables new forms of resistance against the norms of the market economy. However, digital nomads inevitably also comply with the market economy. In this paper, we synthesise literature about the complicating role of technology in the market economy throughout history, to develop a research...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents a literature review of critical information systems (IS) research. Specifically, it focuses on how IS researchers have responded to Myers and Klein’s (2011) call to consider critical approaches and theorists in addition Bourdieu, Foucault and Habermas. The review identifies and discusses three types of critical IS research “beyo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Information Systems (IS) researchers currently lack an obvious place to start their literature searches. Existing tools suffer from being either too narrow in their coverage of existing research, leading to an insufficiency effect (low recall); or they are too encompassing, leading to an impracticality effect (low precision). From 11 listings of IS...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents a literature review and conceptual development of digital nomadism. Digital nomadism is characterised by mobile workers indefinitely travelling between different locations while continually fulfilling their work obligations. The emerging literature on digital nomadism is fragmented and primarily focused on digital nomads' lifest...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Given its interesting history, dating back to the 18th century, crowdfunding is being recognised as a potential key driver of social impact in the 21st century. However, what we have seen is that even the philanthropic/social-benefit focus may not be sufficient to ensure success. In fact, many projects on crowdfunding platforms fail to persuade eno...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Our research on “digital work” is interested in rapidly emerging forms of working and organizing enabled by digital technologies. Many kinds of work, especially knowledge work, are increasingly re-shaped by digital technologies. While some forms of digital working and organizing resemble their non-digital versions (e.g., professors giving remote lectures during the COVID19 crisis) several genuinely novel forms have emerged such as crowdsourcing (e.g., sourcing ideas from internal and external Internet “crowds”), open online collaboration (creating free digital goods such as Wikipedia), digital nomadism (people escaping settled 9-5 living through digital means) and digital hermitism (people withdrawing from society using digital tools). Entirely digital and remote organizations have emerged, and flexible “work from anyway” arrangements are increasingly technologically possible and becoming culturally accepted. We study the ongoing emergence of digital working and organizing, including “best practices” for organizations, workers and their often poorly understood individual, societal, economic and environmental consequences.