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Blair R Costelloe

Blair R Costelloe
Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior · Collective Behaviour

Ph.D. Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

About

17
Publications
6,716
Reads
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311
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2015 - present
Princeton University
Position
  • Research Associate
September 2014 - January 2015
Princeton University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • EEB 323: Integrative Dynamics of Animal Behavior
July 2014 - August 2014
Princeton University
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
November 2010 - January 2014
Princeton University
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
September 2008 - November 2010
Princeton University
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
August 2003 - May 2007
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
Hiding is a cooperative mother–infant behavioural strategy used by many ungulate species to mitigate infant predation risk. During the late stages of the hiding phase, infants begin a transition out of hiding and show behavioural changes that increase their exposure to predators. Mothers in many hider species are known to show potentially costly ch...
Article
Full-text available
The time immediately following birth is a period of high predation risk for ungulate neonates. Ungulate mothers exhibit perinatal behaviors that appear to mitigate offspring risk during this time. However, few studies of infant mortality include the postpartum period. Therefore, the function and effectiveness of these maternal behaviors are unteste...
Article
Prey animals often face a trade-off between investing time in antipredator behaviour and performing self-maintenance activities, such as foraging. Parents face particularly high stakes as they must protect highly vulnerable offspring while also meeting elevated energetic demands. To optimize this trade-off, the risk allocation hypothesis predicts t...
Article
Full-text available
Inexpensive and accessible sensors are accelerating data acquisition in animal ecology. These technologies hold great potential for large-scale ecological understanding, but are limited by current processing approaches which inefficiently distill data into relevant information. We argue that animal ecologists can capitalize on large datasets genera...
Preprint
Full-text available
Methods for collecting animal behavior data in natural environments, such as direct observation and bio-logging, are typically limited in spatiotemporal resolution, the number of animals that can be observed, and information about animals’ social and physical environments. Video imagery can capture rich information about animals and their environme...
Preprint
Full-text available
Data acquisition in animal ecology is rapidly accelerating due to inexpensive and accessible sensors such as smartphones, drones, satellites, audio recorders and bio-logging devices. These new technologies and the data they generate hold great potential for large-scale environmental monitoring and understanding, but are limited by current data proc...
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative behavioral measurements are important for answering questions across scientific disciplines-from neuroscience to ecology. State-of-the-art deep-learning methods offer major advances in data quality and detail by allowing researchers to automatically estimate locations of an animal's body parts directly from images or videos. However, c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantitative behavioral measurements are important for answering questions across scientific disciplines—from neuroscience to ecology. State-of-the-art deep-learning methods offer major advances in data quality and detail by allowing researchers to automatically estimate locations of an animal's body parts directly from images or videos. However, c...
Poster
Full-text available
The patterns captured in animal movement data represent a record of an individual's movement decisions in response to information gleaned from the environment and social partners. Understanding the complex social and environmental factors influencing individual animals is therefore important for interpreting observed movement patterns; however, thi...
Poster
Full-text available
Groups of prey are often better at detecting predators than solitary individuals, a phenomenon known as collective detection. Collective detection requires the transfer of information from individuals that have detected the threat to those that remain unaware. The efficiency and thoroughness of this information transfer will likely affect the group...
Poster
Full-text available
Thomson’s gazelle is a small-bodied antelope that serves as a common prey item for the large carnivores of East Africa. They have a fission-fusion social structure in which females form open-membership groups that move across male breeding territories. The intense predation pressure experienced by this species makes it an excellent system for study...
Article
Full-text available
The time immediately following birth is a period of high predation risk for ungulate neonates. Ungulate mothers exhibit perinatal behaviors that appear to mitigate offspring risk during this time. However, few studies of infant mortality include the postpartum period. Therefore, the function and effectiveness of these maternal behaviors are unteste...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes the postpartum behavior of a wild Grevy’s zebra (Equus grevyi) mare and foal. The foal first attempted to stand within 5 min of birth and succeeded at approximately 10 min after birth. Within 40 min of birth, the infant could walk steadily. The foal did not suckle during the observation time. An ethogram of observed behaviors i...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
I am using natural marking to construct social networks of free-ranging Thomson's gazelles at Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. Thomson's gazelles are an abundant antelope species that exhibit high levels of flexibility in group size, with females forming fission-fusion groups that change in composition multiple times per hour. Individual recognition and social network analysis will help us understand the social dynamics at play in this species.
Project
We are developing and applying drone-based observation and image-based tracking methods to study the behavior of free-ranging animal groups. Our main project addresses antipredator behavior in African ungulates. We aim to 1) identify the drivers of vigilance and attention patterns in individual ungulates and 2) understand the mechanisms by which these behaviors scale up to generate group-level phenomena such as early detection of predators. We are also developing projects on other systems, including gelada monkeys in Ethiopia.
Project
Fieldwork offers unique opportunities for observation of unexpected or rare behavioral phenomena, which can be difficult to observe and study systematically. By publishing short descriptions of these observations, I help to build a collection of records that may eventually enable behavioral ecologists to detect patterns and develop greater understanding of rare behaviors.