Birken Noesen

Birken Noesen
Wright State University | WSU · Department of Psychology

Master of Arts

About

13
Publications
399
Reads
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27
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - September 2020
Air Force Research Laboratory
Position
  • Intern
September 2015 - present
Wright State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
September 2012 - June 2015
Oregon State University
Position
  • Graduate Teaching Assistant
Education
September 2015 - December 2020
Wright State University
Field of study
  • Human Factors Psychology
September 2012 - June 2015
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Psychology
September 2010 - June 2012
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (13)
Preprint
Full-text available
Throughout evolution, the human visual system has adapted to efficiently encode several environmental constants to deal with the huge complexity involved in representing large-scale spatial environments. Being terrestrial animals, these constants reflect a specific ground-based viewpoint. For example, people show a strong affinity for detecting a p...
Chapter
Visual analysis of complex real-world scenes (e.g. overhead imagery) is a skill essential to many professional domains. However, little is currently known about how this skill is formed and develops with experience. The present work adopts a neuroergonomic approach to uncover the underlying mechanisms associated with the acquisition of scene expert...
Article
Recent work studying the temporal dynamics of visual scene processing (Harel et al., 2016) has found that global scene properties (GSPs) modulate the amplitude of early Event-Related Potentials (ERPs). It is still not clear, however, to what extent the processing of these GSPs is influenced by their behavioral relevance, determined by the goals of...
Article
Full-text available
Several behavioural studies have suggested that rarity is critical for enabling irrelevant, salient objects to capture attention. We tested this hypothesis using the N2pc thought to reflect attentional allocation. A cue display was followed by a target display in which participants identified the letter in a specific colour. Experiment 1 pitted rar...