Bill Hughes

Bill Hughes
Glasgow Caledonian University | GCU · Department of Social Sciences, Media and Journalism

Professor

About

36
Publications
14,177
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,406
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (36)
Book
Covering the period from Antiquity to Early Modernity, A Historical Sociology of Disability argues that disabled people have been treated in western society as good to mistreat and – with the rise of Christianity – good to be good to. It examines the place and role of disabled people in the moral economy of the successive cultures that have constit...
Article
The meaning of impairment is often Janus-faced. On the one hand, it is associated with defect, deformity, monstrosity and other tropes that carry the weight of ontological ruin, haunting narratives of physical, mental or sensory catastrophe that disturb the normate sense of being human. Impairment is invested with the debilitating social and moral...
Article
In this article, I argue that disabled people and immigrants are subjected to similar forms of representation. I draw on examples from theology in the Christian Middle Ages, the influence of eugenics on late nineteenth and twentieth-century US immigration policy and welfare reform in contemporary neoliberal Britain. These vignettes are invoked as c...
Article
In this article I argue that disabled people in the United Kingdom have been tipped into an abyss of counterfeit citizenship. They have been smeared as ‘false mendicants’ – an old trick well documented in the historical archives of ableism. Neoliberalism has used this repertoire of invalidation – its noxious taint of cunning and fraud – as the ‘mor...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Non-disabled responses to visible impairment embody either social invisibility or over-attentiveness. The subjective and inter-subjective experiences of impaired bodies and intersubjective encounters within society are important aspects of disablement and the construction of a disabled identity. Impairment is read by and influences the social struc...
Chapter
Elimination and/or correction have been the primary social response to disabled people in modernity. The primary form of experience (of disability), during the same period, has been one of invalidation. Invalidation carries a ‘dual meaning’ as both ‘confinement through incapacity’ and ‘deficit of credibility’ (Hughes, 2000: 558). This (latter and m...
Chapter
Why theory? It is a question the Greeks would probably not have asked. Theoria for our classical cousins was about ‘contemplation’, reflecting on observation and experience, in other words, ways of making sense of the world, reaching out through reason to the juicy fruit of truth. It was built in to what they did and how they approached the world....
Chapter
Theorising disability lies at the heart of many recent social scientific engagements with the body, subjectivity, culture and society. Disability studies have developed across, through and with disciplines of the social sciences and humanities. The extent to which disability illuminates and puts into practice social theory and, moreover, the potent...
Article
The Disabled People’s Movement (DPM) in the UK rejects the view that disability is an illness. For the DPM it is the social processes of discrimination and oppression that create the material circumstances out of which solidarity and politicisation arise. The DPM has also been shy about impairment, arguing that it is generally irrelevant to the iss...
Article
Full-text available
Contemporary sociology has made sense of bodily difference by mobilising a number of tropes. ‘Wounded’ (or vulnerable), ‘monstrous’ and ‘abject’ stand out by virtue of their ubiquity though they do not exhaust the repertoire. These categories highlight the conceptual tensions between the sociology of the body and Disability Studies. In this paper,...
Article
In Disability Studies the question of ontology is establishing itself as a live issue. Whilst there are many arguments and tendencies emerging from this literature, this paper identifies and critically examines an approach to the ontological question in disability studies that is based on an appeal to frailty as a universal characteristic of humani...
Article
Social Policy and the Ethic of Care , Olena Hankivsky, Vancouver: UBC Press, 2004, pp. 178. In this tightly argued text, Olena Hankivsky examines “the potential of an ethic of care to transform the assumptions, content, concepts and meaning of social justice” (30). This is a big task for a small book but the author not only makes a persuasive theor...
Article
Full-text available
The Disabled People's Movement (DPM) & the Feminist Movement appeal to incompatible meanings of 'care'. For the DPM the word 'care' is to be resisted. The emotional connotations implicit in the concept & experience of care inhibit the emancipatory project for independence & self-determination. Feminist theorists value the concept of care, & the emo...
Article
Contemporary sociology makes the case that the concepts of society & social structure are past their sell-by dates. Our world is marked by impermanence & social life is characterized by mobilities. Even self-identity has become liquid. Social actors use consumption artefacts & services to redesign themselves in ways that are commensurate with their...
Article
In this article we examine the tensions between feminist & disability studies perspectives on care. We argue that an emancipatory model of care is one that must address these tensions. In developing this model we consider the notions of (inter)dependence & need across the lifecourse. Drawing on the work of Fraser (1989), we propose that the notion...
Article
Modernity is at the heart of the transformation of impairment into disability. This paper seeks to map out the processes that underpin this claim. Its focus is on the cultures of modernity and post-modernity, and how these complex legacies have constituted and invalidated mental and physical difference. The work of Zygmunt Bauman, particularly his...
Article
Contemporary disability discourse is marked by a struggle between medical and social meanings and models. The latter reflects the aspirations and youthful radicalism of the disability movement, while the former regards itself as the legitimate voice of truth in all matters associated with bodily function and process. This paper argues that the batt...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is an attempt to develop a sociology of impairment and to theorise embodiment in the lebenswelt. Disability studies has failed to address adequately the fundamental issue of bodily agency. The impaired body is represented as a passive recipient of social forces. Such a conception of the body is losing ground within social theory. This pa...
Article
Impairment has been set aside in debates about disability dominated by the social model. This paper seeks to go beyond the Cartesianism which produces this neglect. It suggests that radical disability studies can prosper from a critique of modernity which entails a shift from its singular epistemological origins in the critique of capitalism. The a...
Article
Full-text available
What is the case for and how would one begin to construct a sociology of impairment? This paper argues that the realignment of the disability/impairment distinction is vital for the identity politics of the disability movement. The body is at the heart of contemporary political and theoretical debate, yet the social model of disability makes it an...

Network

Cited By

Projects