Biancamaria Aranguren

Biancamaria Aranguren
La Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana · Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività culturali e del Turismo

About

49
Publications
15,036
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
776
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 1983 - present
La Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana
La Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana
Position
  • Archeologo

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Residue analyses on a Gravettian grinding tool recovered at Grotta Paglicci (32.614±429 cal BP), Southern Italy, have confirmed that early modern humans collected and processed a variety of wild plants for food purposes. The recording of starch grains attributable to wild oat caryopses (Avena cf. barbata) expands our information about the food plan...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper we focus on the technology related to wild plant food processing. In the course of the last ten years, the production of flour from wild plants has been unequivocally documented starting from the Upper Palaeolithic. This has opened up new prospects for studying both the nutrition and the technological skills of Homo sapiens in Europe...
Chapter
THE OLDEST EVIDENCE OF PLANT FOOD PROCESSING IN THE PALAEOLITHIC - Recent studies have cast light on the importance of the vegetal component in the Palaeolithic. This finding is based largely on the evidence of isotopic analyses, on the vegetal residue found in the sites and the starch grains found in tooth tartar and on tools used for grinding. Th...
Conference Paper
THE DIET DURING THE PALAEOLITHIC: A CASE STUDY FROM GROTTA PAGLICCI (RIGNANO GARGANICO – FG) – It is usually assumed that the diet of Palaeolithic hunter-gatherer communities was based almost exclusively on the consumption of meat and of other animal resources (e.g. marrow). Recent studies carried out on dental calculus, as well as on organic resid...
Article
Full-text available
As known, artefacts made from wood are very rarely encountered in prehistoric deposits due to the low durability of this material. Emergency excavations in the spring of 2012 at Poggetti Vecchi, Central Italy, brought to light an open-air, stratified Palaeolithic site of an overall area of around 160 m². The finds are radiometrically dated to the l...
Article
Full-text available
In this work, we present a study on experimental archaeology replicas of 170,000-year-old digging sticks excavated in 2012 in the archaeological site of Poggetti Vecchi (Grosseto, Italy). One of the techniques used for documenting and studying the sticks was the reflectance transformation imaging (RTI) technique, which allows the creation of an int...
Article
A paleosurface with a concentration of wooden-, bone-, and stone-tools interspersed among an accumulation of fossil bones, largely belonging to the straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon antiquus, was found at the bottom of a pool, fed by hot springs, that was excavated at Poggetti Vecchi, near Grosseto (Tuscany, Italy). The site is radiometrically...
Article
Full-text available
In 2012, the excavations for the construction of a thermal pool at Poggetti Vecchi (Grosseto, Tuscany, Central Italy) exposed a stratified succession of seven units with assemblages of bone, wooden and stone tools and fossil bones, largely belonging to the straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon antiquus. The site is radiometrically dated to around...
Poster
Full-text available
The Spinosa Cave is near the city of Massa Marittima in Central Italy (Tuscany). Systematic excavations at the site were carried out from 2001 to 2003 by the Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio per la città metropolitana di Firenze e province di Pistoia e Prato, under the direction of Biancamaria Aranguren and the anthropological sup...
Article
Full-text available
The study concerns the experimental grindstones used to understand the dynamics of the use of the grinding tools found in the Gravettian camp of Bilancino (Florence), which for the first time in Europe documented the production of flour in the Upper Palaeolithic. The identification of starch grains on these tools, largely referable to Typha sp., r...
Article
Full-text available
Excavations for the construction of thermal pools at Poggetti Vecchi (Grosseto, Tuscany, central Italy) exposed a series of wooden tools in an open-air stratified site referable to late Middle Pleistocene. The wooden artifacts were uncovered, together with stone tools and fossil bones, largely belonging to the straight-tusked elephant Paleoloxodon...
Poster
Full-text available
La Grotta della Spinosa è stata indagata in cinque differenti campagne di scavo a opera dalla Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Toscana soCo la direzione scientifica della Dott.ssa Biancamaria Aranguren. Le analisi del materiale osteologico, archeologico e paleontologico confermano come la frequentazione umana di tale grotta sia avvenuta...
Article
Work on thermal pools at Poggetti Vecchi in Grosseto, Italy, exposed an up to 3-meter-thick succession of seven sedimentary units. Unit 2 in the lower portion of the succession contained vertebrate bones, mostly of the straight-tusked elephant, Palaeoloxodon antiquus , commingled with stone, bone, and wooden tools. Thermal carbonates overlying Unit...
Article
Full-text available
In central-southern Tuscany radiolarite has been used as a lithic raw material throughout prehistory. During the Copper Age it was selected for the local production of leaf-shaped artefacts. In the area considered, the Copper Age record is almost totally restricted to burials and virtually no settlements have been investigated so far. Radiolarite a...
Article
Full-text available
Residue analyses on a grinding tool recovered at Grotta Paglicci sublayer 23A [32,614 ± 429 calibrated (cal) B.P.], Southern Italy, have demonstrated that early modern humans collected and processed various plants. The recording of starch grains attributable to Avena (oat) caryopses expands our information about the food plants used for producing f...
Article
Full-text available
The open-air Bilancino site (Mugello basin, Florence, Italy) may be ascribed to the Noaillian facies of the Gravettian. The site is dated to 25,410 ± 150 BP. As no faunal remains have been preserved due to the local deposit conditions, attention has been paid to the procurement strategy of the inorganic raw material e i.e. lithics and minerals e as...
Article
Full-text available
Plant Resources in the Palaeolithic" is a research project focused on the technologies for plant food processing as documented by use-wear traces and plant residue on grinding tools found in European sites. Many researchers have been involved in the project, which encompasses the fields of archaeology, botany and food processing technologies, withi...
Article
Full-text available
a b s t r a c t "Plant Resources in the Palaeolithic" is a research project focused on the technologies for plant food processing as documented by use-wear traces and plant residue on grinding tools found in European sites. Many researchers have been involved in the project, which encompasses the fields of archaeology, botany and food processing te...
Article
Full-text available
The open-air Bilancino site (Mugello basin, Florence, Italy) may be ascribed to the Noaillian facies of the Gravettian. The site is dated to 25,410 ± 150 BP. As no faunal remains have been preserved due to the local deposit conditions, attention has been paid to the procurement strategy of the inorganic raw material e i.e. lithics and minerals e as...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Remontages, burins de Noailles et meules : analyse de la distribution spatiale sur le site de plein air gravettien de Bilancino Résumé Le site de plein air de Bilancino, daté autour de 30000 calBP, est un campement gravettien saisonnier du centre de l'Italie (zone de Mugello, nord-ouest de Florence). La présence de résidus organiques de typha et de...
Article
Full-text available
European Paleolithic subsistence is assumed to have been largely based on animal protein and fat, whereas evidence for plant consumption is rare. We present evidence of starch grains from various wild plants on the surfaces of grinding tools at the sites of Bilancino II (Italy), Kostenki 16-Uglyanka (Russia), and Pavlov VI (Czech Republic). The sam...
Article
Full-text available
Istituto Italiano di Preistoria e Protostoria has approved financial support for a Project entitled “Vegetable resources in the Palaeolithic time”. The background to the Project is set by a number of studies, currently being carried out in the Bilancino Gravettian site near Florence by some of the proponents of the project; these have led to the di...
Book
Full-text available
6. Abstract. The upper palaeolithic site of Bilancino, Tuscany The open air settlement of Bilancino The open air settlement of Bilancino (Mugello Valley, in theTuscan-Emilian Appennine) is located on an alluvial terrace along the Sieve river, about 238 m a.s.l. (Fig. 1). The site was discovered in 1990, and has been explored in two campaigns in 19...
Book
Full-text available
L’insediamento preistorico di Bilancino, attualmente ricoperto dalle acque dell’omonimo lago, è stato scoperto grazie al Gruppo Archeologico di Scarperia nel 1990 ed è stato scavato negli anni 1995 e 1996 dalla Soprintendenza Archeologica della Toscana, con il finanziamento della Regione Toscana. Le ricerche interdisciplinari, coordinate da Bianca...
Article
This paper presents the first general survey of carpological analyses carried out in archaeological sites in Tuscany (Italy), based on literature and our own research. The data show that with the onset of the Neolithic, naked wheats (Triticum aestivum/durum/turgidum), unfortunately not certainly identifiable due to the lack of chaff, different glum...
Article
Full-text available
3 The authors have identified starch grains belonging to wild plants on the surface of a stone from the Gravettian hunter-gatherer campsite of Bilancino (Florence, Italy), dated to around 25 000 bp. The stone can be seen as a grindstone and the starch has been extracted from locally growing edible plants. This evidence can be claimed as implying th...
Article
Full-text available
This study particularly shows the find of 7 copper ingots hoard (of which only 4 gotten) from a little valley near Podere La Speziala, near the town of Massa Marittima (Southern Tuscany), and sets this evidence against its cultural background (the Early Bronze Age). The copper ores of La Speziala mining area till now was well known for the intense...
Poster
Full-text available
During the Eneolithic-Bronze Age the sudden demographic growth in the Massa Marittima Area, located in the Tuscan Maremma, is no doubt related to the intense mining activity, until now not well documented. This study particularly shows the find of a copper ingot from a little valley near Podere Sodacavalli (Serrabottini), approximately 4 kilometres...
Article
Full-text available
In the Mugello Valley, in the Tuscan Appennine, a very extensive paleosurface ascribed to a Gravettian (Noallian Facies) camp site, dating by AMS to about 25.000 B.P., was discovered few years ago. Excavation revealed many working areas characterized by a wide variability of employed siliceous raw materials. In this study we will try to determinate...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Le débat sur la catégorie des outils, traditionnellement classés sous le terme de burin, généralement défini comme " outil destiné au travail des matières dures, en particulier des matières osseuses " s'enrichit par conséquent de l'apport, encore que préliminaire, de l'étude de l'industrie de Bilancino, où deux processus techniques très différents...
Article
Functional Interpretation of a Gravettian Settlement of Noailles Burins Facies. The Bilancino settlement is ascribed to the Gravettian culture (Noaillian facies) on the basis of typological characteristics of the lithic industry, mostly consisting of Noailles burins of classic shape, and of the absolute dating, about 25.000 BP. All available data,...
Article
The Bilancino settlement is ascribed to the Gravettian culture (Noaillian facies) on the basis of typological characteristics of the lithic industry, mostly consisting of Noailles burins of classic shape, and of the absolute dating, about 25.000 BP. All available data, including: archaeological documentation, ethnographical comparison, usewear anal...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The numerous wooden artefacts found in the prehistoric site of Poggetti Vecchi, dated about 200,000 years ago and attributed to early Neandertal groups, constituted a significant sample to set up a methodology for studying prehistoric wooden instruments, very rarely encountered in archaeological deposits. The VIWA project aims to develop a methodology for the virtual reconstruction of these objects, in order to carry out microscopic and non-destructive investigations. The purpose is to obtain a model that allows the identification, characterization and detailed positioning of the micro-traces resulted from producing and using the instruments. Starting from the case study of Poggetti Vecchi wooden sticks and those produced through experimental archeology, the VIWA project wants to test different imaging methodologies and analytical tools, to identify and record the traces left on the instruments. The main goal of the project is to reconstruct the operational chain and possibly the use phases of the objects, overcoming the physical limitations of the extreme fragility of prehistoric wooden artefacts.
Project
this multidisciplinary project focuses on reconstructing changes in environmental/climatic conditions and human behavior occurred during the Upper Palaeolithic in the Mediterranean area, through the revision of materials from two pivotal stratigraphic successions of Southern Italy: the Adriatic cave site of Paglicci and the Tyrrhenian cave site of La Cala. More specifically the project is aimed at identifying palaeo-economic activities of Gravettian-Epigravettian populations in order to detect how human groups were able to differently exploit hunting-gathering territories depending on environmental changes and/or behavioural characteristics. The project takes root from the research carried out at Paglicci and La Cala over the last 50-60 years by the University of Siena. Excavations at Paglicci were conducted by A. Palma di Cesnola and, from 2015, by Annamaria Ronchitelli (RU of Prehistory and Anthropology) with the co-direction of other colleagues of the DSFTA of the University of Siena (Italy). Excavations at La Cala (still in progress) were initially under the supervision of A. Palma di Cesnola and Paolo Gambassini and, from 2014, of Adriana Moroni of the same Research Unit. The project has been funded by several institutions among which the local Archaeological Offices, MIUR, Municipality of Camerota, Parco Nazionale del Gargano, Comunità Montana del Gargano. Institutional partners of the project: Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio per le Province di Barletta-Andria-Trani e Foggia, Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio per le Province di Salerno e Avellino, Comune di Rignano Garganico, Comune di Camerota, Parco Nazionale del Gargano, Parco Nazionale del Cilento e Vallo di Diano.
Project
Considering that plant remains are highly perishable, and for this reason poorly documented in Prehistoric sites, the aim of the project is to acquire new evidence about the importance of the use of plants in the Palaeolithic and to gain a better understanding of the economy and the diet of these most ancient hunter-gatherers.