Bianca Trovò

Bianca Trovò
French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Inserm · Unit of Cognitive Neuroimaging

4.53
 · 
BA, Msc

About

7
Publications
206
Reads
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5
Citations
Introduction
Bianca Trovò currently works as a PhD student at Neurospin, CEA-Saclay (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission) in the UNICOG lab, directed by Stanislas Dehaene, as part of the Computational Brain Team. She does research in cognitive and computational neuroscience on the topic of neural correlates of self-initiated movements and volition using EEG/MEG, psychophysics and computational models. Recently, she has also been working on blockchain applications for open science.
Research Experience
January 2016 - present
Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Brain Computations Team
November 2014 - September 2015
Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati di Trieste
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
January 2018 - January 2020
Sorbonne Université - Faculté de Sciences
Field of study
  • Cognitive and Computational Neuroscience
January 2016 - January 2018
Sorbonne Université
Field of study
  • Cognitive and Computational neuroscience
September 2013 - September 2015
Università degli Studi di Trento
Field of study
  • Cognitive science

Publications

Publications (7)
Preprint
Full-text available
Peer-review is a necessary and essential quality control step for scientific publications. However, the process, which is very costly in terms of time investment, not only is not remunerated but it's also not recognized by the academic community as a relevant scientific output for a researcher. Therefore, scientific dissemination is affected. Here,...
Poster
Full-text available
For decades several studies have been trying to find the source of ‘intention’ in the brain. Historically, we have two landmark studies.The first one, by Kornhuber and Deecke (1965) lead to the discovery of the readiness potential (BP), a slow buildup of neural activity preceding un-cued, “self-initiated” movements, whose location was identified in...
Article
Full-text available
In physics “entrainment” refers to the synchronization of two coupled oscillators with similar fundamental frequencies. In behavioral science, entrainment refers to the tendency of humans to synchronize their movements with rhythmic stimuli. Here, we asked whether human subjects performing a tapping task would entrain their tapping to an undetected...
Poster
Neural activity preceding spontaneous-self-initiated-movements continuously drifts closer to or farther from the decision threshold before an action is initiated. For the stochastic decision model[1] these ongoing sub-threshold fluctuations vary randomly and are thought to contribute to the decision-to-act under increasing levels of uncertainty. Th...
Poster
The Readiness Potential (RP) is a slowly increasing surface-negative cortical potential that precedes spontaneous voluntary movements. A recent interpretation provided by the stochastic decision model [2] suggests that this slow exponential preceding the motor event could be the result of a time-locked average of ongoing sub-threshold fluctuations...
Poster
For decades several studies have been trying to find the source of ‘intention’ in the brain. Historically, we have two landmark studies.The first one, by Kornhuber and Deecke (1965) lead to the discovery of the readiness potential (BP), a slow buildup of neural activity preceding un-cued, “self-initiated” movements, whose location was identified in...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
What is the role of ongoing subthreshold fluctuations in neural activity in the initiation of a spontaneous action (i.e. when there is no external cue or imperative to act)? Can we predict parametric variations in the shape and the amplitude of the readiness potential (and readiness field) that are tied to these fluctuations? According to the stochastic decision model (Schurger, PNAS 2012), background activity in areas of the brain involved in the planning and preparation of actions continuously drifts randomly closer to or farther from the threshold for initiating action. We hypothesize that the role of those fluctuations in the initiation of movement will be inversely proportional to the strength of the immediate external imperative to move. I.e. as the external imperative to act becomes stronger, ongoing background fluctuations will play a lesser role in triggering the movement.