Bianca Suanet

Bianca Suanet
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam | VU · Department of Sociology

About

43
Publications
3,630
Reads
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823
Citations
Citations since 2017
31 Research Items
724 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
Additional affiliations
December 2012 - present
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
April 2010 - December 2012
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: The objective is to assess cohort differences in received emotional and instrumental support in relation to network types. The main guiding hypothesis is that due to increased salience of non-kin with recent social change, those in friend-focused and diverse network types receive more support in later birth cohorts than earlier birth co...
Article
Full-text available
The Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA) is an ongoing longitudinal study of older adults in the Netherlands, which started in 1992. LASA is focused on the determinants, trajectories and consequences of physical, cognitive, emotional and social functioning. The study is based on a nationally representative sample of older adults aged 55 years...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Research on age-related changes in personal networks has found compelling evidence for socioemotional selectivity theory and exchange theory holding that older adults experience a decline in less emotionally close nonkin relations as they age. However, recent societal developments are likely to have increased the salience of nonkin rel...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop an index to measure older adults' exposure to the COVID-19 pandemic and to study its association with various domains of functioning. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: The Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA), a cohort study in the Netherlands. Participants: Community-dwelling older...
Article
This paper investigates belonging among Turkish Alevi older migrants during their stays in the origin country. The few studies that cover belonging among older migrants primarily examined belonging within the confines of host countries. As substantial amounts of time are spent in origin countries, migrants’ life worlds are thus only partially studi...
Article
Full-text available
Societal change related to individualisation has likely made individual resources more important for the maintenance of social ties. This raises the question whether lower-educated adults are more disadvantaged in later-born cohorts in personal network structure and function. Observations are from 4,886 individuals aged 55 and over from the Longitu...
Article
Full-text available
Receipt of long-term care (LTC) is generally associated with worse psychological wellbeing for community-dwelling older adults. In addition to objective features of care use (e.g. formal vs. informal care), the subjective evaluation of care provision in terms of perceived sufficiency might be particularly predictive of one's wellbeing but is seldom...
Article
Full-text available
As a result of the rapid ageing of societies, meeting the demands for long-term care has become increasingly difficult. In the Netherlands, informal care is recognised as a key element to compensate for cut-backs in formal care provision. Formal, informal and privately paid long-term care services, however, are not used equally across socio-economi...
Article
The amount of financial debt held by older adults has grown substantially over the past two decades in Europe. This study examines the association of objective and subjective debt burden with social and emotional loneliness among 1,606 older adults in the Netherlands. Objective debt burden is based on financial terms, such as debt-to-income ratio;...
Article
Full-text available
Due to increased longevity, widowhood occurs much later in life. When comparing over decades, we hypothesize that the increase in loneliness after losing the spouse at an early age is currently higher due to the lack of role models and knowledge of what helps in this situation, and that the recovery of loneliness after widowhood is faster because t...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims at investigating to what extent inequalities in the use of formal, informal and privately paid care have changed over time. Data from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA) was used from three points in time (1995, 2005 and 2015) that capture distinct periods in the recent development of the Dutch long-term care system. In pa...
Article
Full-text available
This paper compares generations (G1, G1.5, G2, G3) of male Turkish migrants to Europe in their transnational behaviours: contact frequency, visits, remittances, property ownership and voting. We aim to explain differences by generational differences in transnational convoy size and integration into residence countries. Data from 798 members of migr...
Article
Objectives The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of genetic and social factors on depressive symptoms and depression over time and to test whether social factors moderate the relationship between depressive symptoms and its underlying genetics in later life. Methods The study included 2279 participants with a mean follow-up o...
Article
In the public debate and media, it has been suggested that there currently is a "loneliness epidemic" in Western societies. To shed light on this pressing issue we investigated whether age-related changes in loneliness found in early studies also pertain to later-born cohorts, and whether mastery and self-efficacy have become increasingly important...
Article
Objective: Despite evidence that social support is strongly related to health, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying this association. This study investigates whether physical activity, depressive symptoms, and chronic diseases mediate the associations between social support and functional capacity. Method: Data from the Longitudinal...
Article
Societal changes and an increase in personal resources are likely to have an impact on the personal relationships of cohorts coming of age. We expect that, in recent times, (1) relationships more often strike a balance in exchanged instrumental and emotional support and (2) relationships are discontinued more often when there is no balance in excha...
Article
Contemporary societal views on old age raise the question whether patterns of stability or decline in network size apply to later birth cohorts of older adults. Change score models are estimated to determine cohort differences in age-related trajectories in network size. Cohorts 1928–37 and 1938–47, 55–64 at baseline in 1992 and 2002 of the Longitu...
Article
Objectives: Previous studies have shown that unmarried older adults are generally at disadvantage in personal networks and social well-being compared to the married. It can be questioned whether their situation has improved in contemporary society, as amongst others the stigma of divorce and being never-married has declined. We hypothesize differe...
Article
Bij het ouder worden, wordt je wereld kleiner. Mensen om je heen overlijden waardoor je aansluiting verliest met je sociale netwerk. Dat is het bestaande beeld over veranderingen in sociale netwerken bij het ouder worden. Maar klopt dit beeld eigenlijk wel? Jarenlang onderzoek toont een veel genuanceerder en positiever beeld.
Article
Full-text available
Background: It is unknown whether an increase in societal participation is important for individuals with a chronic disease. This study explores whether having paid work, volunteer activities or informal care giving differs for individuals with a chronic disease and those without. Methods: Respondents (n = 1779) aged 55-64 years who participated...
Article
Older adults increasingly combine employment with informal care and/or voluntary work. This is good for society but raises the question whether combining multiple roles is also good for individual well-being. Based on data from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (N = 1885), associations between role combinations, role intensity (in employment,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background Societal participation in the Netherlands has increased due to policy changes. We do not know whether this increase in societal participation also counts for people with chronic disease. This study aims to explore differences and similarities in 3 forms of societal participation, having paid work, providing informal care and involvement...
Article
Objectives: Contemporary societal views on old age as well as a rise in retirement age raise the question whether patterns of stability and/or decline in network size as found in earlier studies similarly apply to later birth cohorts of older adults. Methods: Change score models are estimated to determine cohort differences in age-related trajec...
Article
Full-text available
This research investigates how a sense of belonging functions as protective mechanism against loneliness. Inspired by the work of Berry (1980) on acculturation strategies (i.e. integration, assimilation, separation and marginalization), we distinguish migrants who feel a relatively strong or weak sense of belonging to larger society and those who f...
Article
Recent societal changes have increased the salience of non-kin relationships. It can be questioned whether network types that are more strongly non-kin-based give more informal care nowadays. We study how informal care use differs according to network type for three birth cohorts. Data from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA) on older adu...
Article
Studies have extensively examined care received in kin relationships, but have often disregarded non-kin ties. Recent societal changes are likely to have increased the salience of non-kin relationships. Those in friend-focused networks might thus be equally or more likely to receive any informal care compared to those in family-focused networks in...
Article
Gerontological research has long acknowledged the salience of social relations for healthy aging as well as the importance of health for maintaining a solid support network. This symposium brings together five papers that show new insights in how social relations and health interact in later life. Aartsen and Veenstra use Norwegian NorLAG data to i...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates how resources and constraints (location of family, gender, income, cultural distance to society of settlement, and health) impact the experience of two interrelated dimensions of transnational aging: transnational behavior and transnational belonging. We specify transnational behavior by visitation of the country of origin a...
Article
Full-text available
It has been widely recognised that poor health is one of the main barriers to participation in volunteer activities in older age. Therefore, it is crucial to examine the participation of older people in volunteering, especially those in poor health. Based on the resource theory of volunteering, the aim of this study is to better understand the corr...
Article
ABSTRACT Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the association between physical frailty and social functioning among older adults, cross-sectionally and prospectively over 3 years. Study design: The study sample consisted of 1115 older adults aged 65 and over from two waves of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam, a population based st...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates trends in, and the interdependence of, the use of informal and formal home care of community-dwelling older people over the last two decades in the context of governmental reform of long-term care services and modernisation of informal relationships. Seven observations of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam covering the t...
Article
Guided by trends of increased prevalence and social acceptance of stepfamilies, the authors argue that stepparents are more likely to include stepchildren in their personal network in recent times. Data are from observations by 2 studies: (a) the Living Arrangements and Social Networks of Older Adults Study and (b) the Longitudinal Aging Study Amst...
Article
Full-text available
Research on the effects of sibling position on marriage timing has produced ambivalent findings, suggesting that birth order effects were contingent on social, local, and historical contexts. Based on a large database of marriage certificates from five Dutch provinces between 1840 and 1922, we examine the influence of birth order on marriage timing...
Article
Full-text available
Cross-national comparisons employed welfare state classifications to explain differences in care use in the European older population. Yet these classifications do not cover all care-related societal characteristics and limit our understanding of which specific societal characteristics are most important. Using the Survey of Health, Ageing and Reti...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates how community characteristics influenced the timing of marriage of men and women in nineteenth and early twentieth century Netherlands on the basis of a large scale database consisting of marriage certificates covering five provinces of the Netherlands between 1840 and 1922. The results show the significance of religious con...
Article
Full-text available
The positive trend in volunteering among the Dutch young old may in part be due to a relatively favorable disposition to volunteer. Using data from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam, volunteering rates of 55-64 year olds in 1992 and 2002 were compared and associated with (among others) three types of dispositional factors: religious involvemen...

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Project (1)
Project
Over the last 160 years, a remarkable decline of fertility has taken place in European societies. With rapid population aging, current below-replacement fertility looms as the key social issue of the twenty-first century. Intriguingly, substantial regional disparities in fertility levels and reproductive change have been prevalent and remain existent. Previous explanations emphasizing economic development and cultural change have not been able to clarify these differences. Building further on recent approaches that stress the social relations and interactions that connect individuals to one another, the proposed program zooms in on the place where decisions on procreation are primarily taken: the institution of the family. Family relations are known to differ strongly across regions as a result of different family systems. In different family systems, family affects fertility in highly distinctive ways. By combining previous economic and cultural explanations with theories on family influences and the cultural variation therein, the program aims at opening up new vistas for understanding long-term population change. The key objectives of the program are: 1. How do family relations and practices influence reproductive behavior? 2. How do family influences on reproductive behavior differ across family systems? 3. How has the strength and relative importance of family influences on reproductive behavior changed over the last 160 years across different family systems, independent from and in interaction with other determinants of fertility decline? The research questions are answered through comparative macro- and micro-level analyses conducted by a team of three PhDs and the principal investigator. The program results in detailed knowledge on the diverse roles that family played in shaping fertility behavior in regions and groups with longstanding diverging cultural conceptions of family and kin, knowledge that will also be of interest to policy makers designing courses of action to intervene in processes of population ageing and population decline.