Bianca E. Bersani

Bianca E. Bersani
University of Massachusetts Boston | UMB · Department of Sociology

PhD

About

33
Publications
12,034
Reads
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1,165
Citations
Citations since 2016
15 Research Items
843 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
Additional affiliations
August 2010 - present
University of Massachusetts Boston
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 2004 - May 2010
University of Maryland, College Park
Field of study
  • Criminology and Criminal Justice

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
Full-text available
Adolescent involvement in risky behavior is ubiquitous and normative. Equally pervasive is the rapid decline in risky behavior during the transition to adulthood. Yet, for many, risky behavior results in arrest. Whereas prior research finds that arrest is associated with an increased risk of experiencing a host of detrimental outcomes, less underst...
Article
Full-text available
While mounting evidence reveals an immigrant paradox whereby foreign-born individual’s exhibit better than expected health outcomes, this advantage is not evenly distributed with evidence of differential vulnerabilities for suicidality comparing 1.5 and first generations. We use a developmental framework to explore for variation in suicidality by d...
Article
Criminal justice contact is a prevalent, if not expected, life event for many high-risk individuals with deleterious consequences; yet, many individuals at high risk are able to avoid this contact (i.e. negative cases exist). In this study, we draw on the life course framework and utilize negative case analysis to (1) estimate the prevalence of cri...
Article
Objective This study reassesses the generational disparity in immigrant offending. Patterns and predictors of offending are compared using traditional peer-based models and an alternative within-family (parent–child dyad) model. Method The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979; NLSY79) and NLSY-Child and Young Adult (NLSY_CYA) data are merge...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The age-crime curve is a well-known “fact” in criminology; yet, historically, attention to the interplay between chronological age and offending has focused almost exclusively on the first half of the curve (i.e., onset, rapid escalation, and peak in mid to late adolescence). This study advances understanding of the relationship between off...
Article
Full-text available
PurposeBlack women remain a traditionally understudied population in life course criminology and in studies of criminal desistance specifically. This work contributes to the desistance literature by focusing on within-group heterogeneity among black women, and examining whether variation in the structural position (measured at both distal and proxi...
Article
This study investigates the association between undocumented immigration and crime among youthful offenders. Using official record and self-reported offending measures collected across seven-waves of data from the longitudinal Crossroads Study, the prevalence and variety of offending are compared for undocumented immigrant, documented immigrant, an...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Mounting evidence reveals that foreign-born, first generation immigrants have significantly lower levels of criminal involvement compared to their US-born, second and third-plus generation peers. This study investigates whether this finding is influenced by differential crime reporting practices by testing for systematic crime reporting b...
Article
After decades of relative obscurity, research on desistance from offending has experienced an exponential, and much warranted, escalation in attention. This precipitous growth is motivated by the timely alignment of theory, data, and method that characterized the opening of the twenty-first century. Despite the growth of the field, fundamental ques...
Article
Objectives: This study tests theorized mechanisms of desistance, and whether the process of desistance is conditioned by social structural position. Methods: We investigate how marriage promotes desistance from crime among urban African American males raised in the Woodlawn community, a disadvantaged neighborhood in Chicago. Using hierarchical l...
Code
These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this c...
Code
These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this c...
Article
Although research shows that involvement in crime varies across immigrant generations, less is known about why this is so. Using 13 waves of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 data, we examine the influence of marriage—a key correlate of desistance from crime—to understand more fully patterns of offending across immigrant generations during...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Motivated by offender typology debates, we evaluate whether adult offending trajectories can be predicted from adolescent risk factors. Methods Drawing on data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development (N = 411), we use person-centered, latent class cluster analysis (LCCA) to identify groups of respondents with similar behavioral,...
Article
Full-text available
Despite a considerable body of research demonstrating the beneficial effects of marriage for criminal desistance, data limitations have resulted in much of this work being based on predominantly white, male samples. In light of the rapidly changing demographic landscape of the US—and particularly the tremendous growth in the Hispanic population—the...
Article
Research SummaryWe develop a set of hypotheses informed by a social disorganization framework and test them using newly available data on nearly 600 terrorist attacks in U.S. counties from 1990 to 2011. Our results show that terrorist attacks were more common in counties characterized by greater language diversity, a larger proportion of foreign-bo...
Chapter
Twenty years ago, Sampson and Laub (1993:Crime in the making: pathways and turning points through life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press) formally presented their age-graded theory of informal social control highlighting the importance of social bonds across the entire life course in understanding pathways into and out of crime. Since then,...
Article
It is now well documented that the view that immigrants commit more crime than native-born persons is not supported by empirical research. Yet, the knowledge base is limited in our understanding of the criminological frameworks that may distinguish these groups and, in part, lead to divergent offending patterns. We use the legal socialization frame...
Article
Full-text available
The myth of the criminal immigrant has permeated public and political debate for much of this nation's history and persists despite growing evidence to the contrary. Crime concerns are increasingly aimed at the indirect impact of immigration on crime highlighting the criminal pursuits of the children of immigrants. Adding to extant knowledge on the...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence continues to accumulate documenting a generational disparity in offending whereby second generation immigrants (the children of immigrants) evidence a precipitous increase in offending compared to their first generation, foreign-born peers. An understanding of this pattern is most often couched in terms reflective of segmented assimilation...
Article
Full-text available
Research on immigration and crime has only recently started to consider potential heterogeneity in longitudinal patterns of immigrant offending. Guided by segmented assimilation and life course criminology frameworks, this article advances prior research on the immigration-crime nexus in three ways: using a large sample of high-risk adjudicated you...
Article
Despite the continued growth of research demonstrating that marriage promotes desistance from crime, efforts aimed at understanding the mechanisms driving this effect are limited. Several theories propose to explain why we observe a reduction in offending after marriage including identity changes, strengthened attachments, reduced opportunities, an...
Article
Full-text available
Distinguishing trajectories of criminal offending over the life course, especially the prediction of high-rate offenders, has received considerable attention over the past two decades. Motivated by a recent study by Sampson and Laub (2003), this study uses longitudinal data on conviction histories from the Dutch Criminal Career and Life-Course Stud...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last two decades, research examining desistance from crime in adulthood has steadily increased. The evidence from this body of research consistently demonstrates that salient life events—in particular, marriage—are associated with a reduction of offending across the life course. However, previous studies have been largely limited to male s...
Article
Full-text available
Although previous research has examined correlates of running away among samples of currently homeless and runaway adolescents, little is known about what factors will predict the likelihood that a housed adolescent with no prior history of running away will leave home. As such, the current study uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to ex...
Article
Recently, researchers have devoted significant attention to the influence of turning points such as marriage, employment, and military service on criminal desistance in adulthood. Because offending peaks in adolescence, the relative lack of research on influential adolescent turning points is notable. Given the extensive research linking school fai...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to examine whether the influence of key characteristics on adolescent alcohol misuse (i.e., maternal binge drinking, parenting, peers, school characteristics, and the adolescent's own behavior) change over time and whether predictors of adolescent alcohol misuse vary by gender and race/ethnicity. Using prospective, lon...
Article
Full-text available
Child maltreatment researchers have often suggested that experiences with child neglect have long-term, negative effects. Child neglect is thought to have particularly adverse effects on self-control, peer relations, and delinquency. In this research, we examine the relationship of child neglect with adolescent violence via self-control and peer re...
Article
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Nebraska--Lincoln, 2004. Includes bibliographical references.

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