Bertha Chin

Bertha Chin
Swinburne University of Technology · Faculty of Business & Design(Sarawak)

Doctor of Philosophy
Writing a book proposal for the solo monograph

About

19
Publications
4,508
Reads
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196
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
165 Citations
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Additional affiliations
September 2007 - December 2014
London Metropolitan University
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
October 2006 - July 2011
Cardiff University
Field of study
  • Media & Cultural Studies
September 2000 - September 2001
Goldsmiths, University of London
Field of study
  • Media & Communications

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Fanfiction as a cultural practice has rapidly evolved in recent years, from a community-based form of social interaction to a globally recognised form of narrative world-building [...]
Chapter
The practice of self-care and wellbeing in academia is often considered a condition of neoliberalism. However, it is a critique that comes from a space where academics are not necessarily hampered by the ‘tyranny of distance’ (Abidin, 2019, p. 79), where access (to peer networks, mental health services) is taken for granted. This autoethnographic a...
Book
This book considers the practices and techniques fans utilize to interact with different aspects and elements of food cultures. With attention to food cultures across nations, societies, cultures, and historical periods, the collected essays consider the rituals and values of fan communities as reflections of their food culture, whether in relation...
Chapter
This chapter looks at how the accrual of fan social capital influences the hierarchies of fandom, despite early claims that fan communities are democratic communities free of hierarchies. Online fan forums, fansites with connections to celebrities and “The Powers that Be” of popular media texts often have set rules and regulations to ease managemen...
Chapter
A central truism of English-language media fan studies is that modern fandoms are “imagined communities” fostered by technologies that enable geographically dispersed people to overcome time and distance in forging virtual communities of affect. As originally theorized by Benedict Anderson (1991), imagined communities arise through the interpellati...
Article
Review of Kristin M. Barton and Jonathan Malcolm Lampley, eds. Fan CULTure: Essays on participatory fandom in the 21st century. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2014. Paperback, $40 (212p) ISBN 978-0-7864-7418-9, E-book ISBN 978-1-4766-0459-6.
Article
Orlando Jones, an American film and television writer, producer, and actor who currently plays Captain Frank Irving in Fox’s Sleepy Hollow, provides an intriguing example of how producers and fans can engage in a receptive and dynamic relationship through social media, most specifically through Twitter and Tumblr. We interviewed Jones to ascertain...
Article
Current scholarship on fandom has been preoccupied with examining the changing relationship between media industry professionals and fans. Media producers, celebrities, and industry insiders are increasingly establishing contact with fans, bypassing traditional media entertainment outlets to provide them with information directly. This contact is f...
Article
This conversation among Bertha Chin, Bethan Jones, Myles McNutt, and Luke Pebler about the Veronica Mars (2004–7) Kickstarter campaign to fund a film assesses the implications of crowd sourcing and fan labor.
Article
As guest editors of this special issue of New Media & Society, we examine the concept of crowdfunding, where grassroots creative projects are funded by the masses through websites such as Kickstarter and Indiegogo, a practice that has been steadily gaining attention in the last few years, across many different sectors of society. We introduce the n...
Article
Fan cultural production, be it in the form of fan fiction, art or videos are often celebrated in fan studies as evidence of fan creativity, fans’ skills in adopting technology and their expert knowledge of the texts. As Jenkins argues, “the pleasure of the form centers on the fascination in watching familiar images wrenched free from their previous...
Article
Full-text available
In this discussion, we advocate for a broad(er) model of transcultural fandom studies that,in shifting focus to the affective affinities that spark fan interest in transcultural fan objects,is intended as a corrective to nation-centred analyses of border-crossing fandoms. It is ourcontention that the binary approach to transnational fandom maintain...
Article
The media industry's embrace of social media has changed the relationship between fans and producers in general, and The X-Files is no exception. XFilesNews.com, a news fansite, was created shortly after filming for I Want To Believe (2008) commenced. The site forged a connection with producer Frank Spotnitz and was instrumental in the fan-targeted...
Article
In this article we argue that “citizen journalist” debates surrounding weblogs, or “blogs”, have tended to displace attention from the ways in which specific media professionals (e.g. those working on television drama) have used blogging as a promotional tool. Rather than challenging forms of media power, we suggest that this blogging actually rein...

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