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Bernadette Flanagan

Bernadette Flanagan
SOUTH EAST TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY

PhD

About

20
Publications
11,214
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105
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
92 Citations
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Introduction
A forthcoming issue of Religions will include articles and reviews which discuss the longstanding recognition of diverse connections between spirituality and addiction and emerging discussions regarding the spiritual dimensions of addiction treatments. The overall focus will be on the overlaps between the journey into addiction and the spiritual journey, informed by the insight of Carl Jung that addictive craving and the seeking of ultimate meaning may be intimately connected.

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
This collection of papers is inspired by years of collaboration in delivering academic programmes in Applied Spirituality [...]
Poster
This issue of Religions will include articles and reviews which discuss the longstanding recognition of diverse connections between spirituality and addiction and emerging discussions regarding the spiritual dimensions of addiction treatments. The overall focus will be on the overlaps between the journey into addiction and the spiritual journey, in...
Cover Page
Full-text available
Increasingly, it is being recognized that spirituality, defined here as "a multiform search for a transcendent meaning of life that connects them to all living beings and brings them in touch with God or ‘Ultimate Reality,’" is an aspect of almost every sphere and aspect of social life. It appears in humanity’s dealings with nature, home and commun...
Article
Full-text available
Healthcare chaplains operate in many healthcare sites internationally and yet their contribution is not always clearly understood by medical and healthcare staff. This review aims to explore the chaplains’ role in healthcare, with a view to informing best practice in future healthcare chaplaincy. Overall the extent of the provision and staffing of...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to explore current approaches to and facilities for spiritual care provision in the Republic of Ireland. The findings identify that providing spiritual care to patients is a key component of hospital policy. Spiritual support is identified as the responsibility of the whole healthcare team with specific responsibility being attribu...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is an invitation to contemplate the phenomenon of presence. This is inherently important, in the bigger picture and broader conversation concerning presence and more especially the art of presence as spiritual care. Experience centred narratives are ‘texts’ which bring stories of personal experience into being. The self-narrative (autoet...
Article
Full-text available
Spirituality in Contemporary Ireland: Manifesting Indigeneity1 Michael O’Sullivan and Bernadette Flanagan Spiritus 16 Special Issue (2016): A56–A73 © 2017 by Johns Hopkins University Press Opening extract; the whole text can be requested from the authors The focus of this essay is an examination of a few of the contours of the spiritual search in c...
Chapter
This essay seeks to explore the evolving discourses of spirituality and mysticism. It review how theories of the essence of mysticism have differed depending on whether mysticism is regarded as the perennial and intimate transformation of consciousness in the encounter with holy mystery, or the articulation of that encounter is time-bound expressio...
Article
Full-text available
A Spirituality Interest Group (SIG) was set up in in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Republic of Ireland (ROI), in March 2013. This paper reports on some of the journey and requirements involved in developing the group. It highlights the essential work of establishing agreed understandings in an objective way in order f...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on a descriptive qualitative study that explored the value and benefit of Serenity Spirituality Sessions programme for older nursing home residents. The research was carried out in six nursing homes in the Republic of Ireland. The facilitators of these sessions, who worked in the nursing homes, were interviewed about their experi...
Article
Full-text available
There has been much discussion of the growing need for spiritual education in school settings, but less investigation of the form and shape that such a practice might take. This article begins by recalling Hannan Alexander and Terence McLaughlin's distinction between religiously 'tethered' and 'untethered' spirituality, but it then eschews these di...
Book
Spiritual capital is a concept that is being embraced by a range of theorists in response to the great destruction being wrought by the global economic crisis. Spiritual Capital seeks to re-focus discussion on core social values, on individuals' value systems and the internal dynamics that impel human beings to live by truth, goodness and love. Gen...
Article
Full-text available
The article provides an overview of the development of the academic study of spirituality in Ireland, with particular reference to the changing relationship between theology and spirituality. The outline serves as a compass for mapping equivalent developments internationally. The new disciplinary partnership which is being forged with educational t...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
new monasticism is arising around the world and has many different forms which I am anxious to learn about

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
I am pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the 'Pilgrimage and Flourishing' Symposium which is part of the Ancient Connections project that I am involved in. Call for Papers ‘Pilgrimage and Flourishing’ Symposium: The multi-layered benefits and challenges of pilgrimage March 11-12, 2023 Venue: The Riverside Park Hotel, Enniscorthy, Ireland During the COVID-19 pandemic, pilgrimage tourism has flourished all over the world. New and revived pilgrimage routes have emerged in many destinations including Italy, Japan, Nepal, and the UK. Various forms of pilgrimages have been attracting secular tourists, such as the increasing numbers of South Korean tourists walking the Caminos in Spain. Virtual pilgrimages have become increasingly popular during the pandemic, which would sustain especially for those who have immobility due to disability/illness. Pilgrimage walks have been particularly popular during the pandemic as a means of improving mental, physical and psychological well-being, social interaction, self-reflection, spiritual recharge, etc. We have also seen pilgrimages contributing to the well-being of local communities, by providing livelihoods and liveliness; and helping aid cultural revitalisation. Some new pilgrimages are intentionally created by authorities and charities in ways that benefit and engage with local communities. For example, the Ancient Connections project linking Pembrokeshire in Wales to County Wexford in Ireland, involves various community engagement activities, and collaborations with local artists. Although the benefits of pilgrimage tourism to local/rural communities have been recognised during the pandemic and beyond, there is a lack of awareness and support from governments and authorities for supportive infrastructure and marketing, as well as local communities, and small business involvement. There is a need for a collaborative effort, where various stakeholders actively communicate and help optimise the potential benefits of pilgrimage tourism in communities, especially in economically deprived and marginalised areas. To explore the emerging phenomenon in pilgrimage tourism and its sustainable, resilient and regenerative futures, we like to invite you to a symposium, “Pilgrimage and Flourishing” where scholars, practitioners, government officials, creatives and other stakeholders will examine the current issues, share knowledge and insights, and discuss pilgrimage tourism’s economically, socially and environmentally sustainable futures. We also like to discuss: what the practical steps are in setting up modern-day pilgrimage routes; how to create a working model between pilgrimage organisations and tourism agencies/local/central governments; how to navigate the difference between pilgrimage experience and “regular” tourism. How can we encourage as diverse a group of pilgrims as possible, both in religion or non-religion, racial and socio-economic backgrounds? What kinds of pilgrims do “we” want to see on the path, and how much should diversity feature in decision-making? We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines and subject areas including visual and audio arts, movement practitioners, anthropology, human geography, sociology, psychology, cultural studies, economics, history, development studies, critical tourism studies, hospitality/event management, government and charity organisations. Topics might include, but are not limited to: - Pandemic landscapes and pilgrimage tourism - Rural development through pilgrimage tourism after the pandemic - Community and cultural revitalisation through pilgrimage in rural areas - Pilgrimage and cultural/heritage/language revitalisation - Pilgrimage tourism’s impact on the environment and the local economy - Poverty alleviation and pilgrimage tourism in marginalised areas - Rural entrepreneurship and small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs) - The greening of the economy and pilgrimage tourism - Proximity tourism and pilgrimage in rural areas - Main barriers to pilgrimage tourism and solutions (e.g. low-cost accommodation) - The changing nature of pilgrimage (a niche vs. ‘mainstream’ cultural tourism), and what it means for future development - Tensions and conflict among pilgrimage stakeholders - Creative responses to pilgrimage - Development of creative tools to enhance pilgrim experience - Co-creation in pilgrimage community projects (arts, festivals, etc.) We strongly encourage speakers to present in a creative way, which can include showing a short film, reading poetry, storytelling, movement/dancing, singing, Pecha Kucha, etc. Please send your abstract (no more than 250 words) to us via email (jaeyeon@jaeyeonchoe.com) by the 15th of October. There is no registration fee for participating in this event but there is limited space. Thank you!
Project
Applications are invited for a co-funded PhD research programme established between the School of Humanities at Waterford Institute of Technology and the Spirituality Institute for Research and Education (SpIRE), Dublin. The project is entitled HUNGER FOR FOOD, HUNGER FOR LIFE: THE INNER SPIRITUAL WORLD OF WOMEN WHO HAVE OVERCOME EATHING DISORDERS. An estimated 188,895 Irish people will experience an eating disorder at some point in their lives and approximately three quarters of these people are women. In Ireland the extent to which women have used spiritual interventions in the journey through eating disorders has not been researched, despite some articles in the public media providing narrative accounts of effective spiritual interventions. These personal accounts report how Finding Stillness, Practicing Gratitude; Expressive Prayer; Connection with a Higher Power assisted in the journey of recovery. The researcher will employ an exploratory methodology (1) To identify spiritual interventions which were used by women aged 35 - 65 (2) To assess the academic literature regarding such spiritual interventions (3) To discover the lineage of such spiritual interventions? (4) To investigate how the choice of spiritual practices by Irish clients converge / diverge with the choices made by those who have recovered from eating disorders in studies in other parts of the world? (5) To analyse the narratives of research participants so as to identify any generic characteristics of spiritual resilience that are specific to the Eating Disorder recovery journey, by collating with parallel personal histories reported in narrative medicine findings. The study will employ desk based; narrative; and contemplative research methodologies. It will be retrospective in focus and will not seek to undertake medical interventions. The findings will have the potential to contribute a unique range of interventions for the treatment of the growing numbers of young women with eating disorders in Ireland. In the HSE's National Clinical Programme for Eating Disorders (2018; p.110), the need for "specialist" care for spiritual issues related to eating disorders is noted, but not developed - thus providing a hint for future directions of treatment that need further research, such as the project being proposed here.