Benxiang Zeng

Benxiang Zeng
Freelance

PhD

About

83
Publications
84,162
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1,486
Citations

Publications

Publications (83)
Article
Full-text available
Poverty is widely recognized as a multifaceted concept and has been extensively studied. However, less research has been conducted to explore multidimensional poverty in China. This article aims to investigate the measurements and determinants of multidimensional poverty in mountainous areas of Southeast China. The Alkire–Foster method and a logist...
Article
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) and successful social enterprises would play an irreplaceable role in Tourism-assisting the poor (TAP). Research into CSR and social enterprises in TAP in China is in a very early stage. Although more and more researchers have paid attention to CSR in tourism and poverty alleviation practice, they seldom give t...
Article
The agriculture sector in northern Australia is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and climate variability. Climate change risks for future agricultural development include higher atmospheric temperature, increased rainfall variability and an increase in the frequency and severity of extreme weather events such as floods, droughts, heatwav...
Article
Full-text available
“Tourism-Assisting the Poor” has been an important approach in anti-poverty strategy. Studies suggest that the conventional tourism model fails to generate benefits for the poor and to some extent enlarges the gap between the poor and the rich, which subsequently causes more social problems. Pro-poor tourism (PPT) is regarded as an alternative mode...
Article
Full-text available
This paper aims to establish the link between tourists’ perceptions on cultural offers and their overall satisfaction, and explore the implication of this link for sustainable tourist destination management. Assessing online customers’ reviews, this study identifies a positive correlation between visitors’ perspectives and experiences at the on-sit...
Article
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This paper investigates research progress in the field of natural resource management (NRM) related Indigenous ecological knowledge (IEK) during the last decade. Key findings include the importance of understanding that IEK and its integration into western scientific knowledge has been globally recognised in natural resource management, and that th...
Article
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The disposal and treatment of solid waste have been global concerns, especially regarding urban areas. Many people debate the balance between economic development and environment protection. Sustainability is always an issue which attracts attention from not only researchers but also from governmental organizations and the public, either in develop...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Immigration has been an important source of labour supply for Australia. Working Holiday Maker (WHM) Visa Programme is successful in meeting many of its objectives to supply labour for employers. This paper investigates the current situation of WHMs in Alice Springs, the NT, Australia, and identifies the major issues that block WHMs out of the regi...
Chapter
Full-text available
This research analyses the role of ‘culture’ in Indigenous tourism management in Central Australia. Indigenous culture is a major driver of Indigenous tourism development and plays a key role in Indigenous tourism establishment and management. Yet culture is a diffuse concept that has both ‘high’ culture and ‘low’ culture aspects. Culture also has...
Chapter
Full-text available
An integrated national feral camel management plan is being implemented across the camel range in Australia, aiming to control the damage caused by camels. The culling operation is currently the main management approach. Although concerns about the environmental consequences of shot-dead camels decomposing in the bush are often raised, there is a l...
Conference Paper
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The positive e-WOM associated with higher customer satisfaction will deliver positive images and potentially contribute to an increase in tourist numbers and consumption. Yet, little is known about the role and impacts of e-WOM in tourism development and hospitality management in regional areas where there is a big difference with urban areas. Focu...
Article
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An Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) is an area of land that the Indigenous traditional owners have entered into a voluntary agreement with the Australian Government. This arrangement is to promote biodiversity and conserve cultural resources in line with international standards. A successful IPA supposedly brings together traditional Indigenous know...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In this report we outline the scale and composition of population ageing impending in the Northern Territory as the context for presenting results from a large survey of seniors conducted in late 2013 and early 2014. The survey was conducted in partnership with the Council on the Ageing, NT. This report summarises the results of the survey and exam...
Article
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Using tourism as an instrument to reduce poverty is an increasingly common policy in developing countries. Based on a case study in China, this paper analyses the effects of tourism on the incomes of a poor community through the use of a survey replicating an earlier work in the same area supported by secondary data sets supplemented by observation...
Article
Full-text available
Tourism development is a strategic choice for the effective management of parks especially in those where local communities including Indigenous people living in. Indigenous participation in park tourism seems a good option for Indigenous people’s involvement in park management and regional development. However, a lot of issues remain to be address...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There have been many studies on the economic, cultural and social determinants of Chinese outbound tourism, which are essential for tourism marketing. However, some important recent culture associated changes in the Chinese outbound tourism market seem to have been insufficiently analysed. This paper reviews recent literature and identifies some cu...
Article
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The growing role of social media in tourism has been increasingly an emerging research topic. Social media plays a significant role in many aspects of tourism, especially in information search and decision-making behaviours, tourism promotion and in focusing on best practices for interacting with consumers. Leveraging off social media to market tou...
Article
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Continuous rapid economic growth has made China one of largest economies in the world. Chinese women have been playing an important role in many aspects of socio-economic activities. However, in recent decades overall women’s political participation in China has not been significantly improved. The spindled shape of women’s representation in the po...
Article
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Culling feral camels will impact on the carbon emissions from them. Culling of feral camels stops their long-term continuous methane emission, but emits carbon from their carcasses in the short term. Through on-site monitoring of the decomposition process of camels that have been shot dead, this paper models the pattern of carbon emissions during t...
Article
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The Alice Solar City (ASC) project was one of seven under the Australian Government's Solar Cities Program. This paper investigates the actual and potential multi-dimensional impacts of the Alice Solar City project on the local tourism industry in Alice Springs. The results suggest that the ASC project was not a tourist attraction. There was a posi...
Article
Full-text available
Development theorists have long debated the economic role of the state. With regard to contemporary China, this debate has been manifested in the opposition between neo-liberal and neo-statist paradigms, in particular the role of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in the Chinese economic ‘miracle’. Neo-liberals, especially the Western financial media,...
Article
Full-text available
In central Australia feral camels constitute a growing environmental problem. The current control solution is population reduction to protect key environmental assets, mainly through culling by shooting to waste and some small-scale commercial harvest. From knowledge of the 2008 population and projected rates of increase, this paper simulates the e...
Article
A survey of tourists to the protected areas in the Taibai Mountain (太白山) Region of China reveals a lo-cal domestic market, dominated by students and company employees. The market is attracted by the natural beauty of the Region, but not yet focused on nature based activities in the many protected areas. Given the Region’s assured tourism future bas...
Article
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Article
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The role of Pro-Poor Tourism has been increasingly studied in China since the 1990s. The research has addressed a broad range of key issues such as the implication of “fu pin lv you” (or TAP to use an English acronym arising from the translation ‘Tourism-Assisting the Poor’), governmental roles, local participation and the contribution of rural, na...
Article
Any cursory analysis of the potential for Indigenous tourism in Australia must conclude that the opportunities are great, as Australia's Indigenous culture is an obvious point of difference and attraction in an increasingly homogenised tourism world. Yet remote Australia's Indigenous tourism industry has not realised its potential and does not look...
Article
; DOCTOR Benxiang Zeng is a researcher at Charles Darwin University in Alice Springs. He has served in the Northern Territory Government and is the author of Tourism Development and Local Poverty. He is currently working with the School for Social and Policy Research Institute of Advanced Studies. He speaks to Mluleki Moyo. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER...
Article
This is PhD Thesis, published by University of Quensland. The full thesis is available online: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:158096 ============================================== Protected areas are one of the main tourist attractions and home to many poor people living in and around them in many developing countries. Tourism development...
Article
Feral camels have significant negative impacts on the environment and the social/cultural values of Aboriginal people. These impacts include damage to vegetation through feeding behaviour and trampling; suppression of recruitment in some plant species; damage to wetlands through fouling, trampling, and sedimentation; competition with native animals...
Article
The perceptions of people living within the current range of feral camels and involved in the pastoral industry and conservation reserve management were assessed through a questionnaire survey. The survey was designed to gauge understanding about the distribution and abundance of feral camels, perspective on camel impacts, and attitudes towards dif...
Article
Full-text available
Feral camels have severe negative impacts on key environmental economic and social/cultural assets across a wide area in Australia and their population is increasing. In this paper we utilised Multicriteria Evaluation (MCE) within a Geographic Information System (GIS) to create a decision tool for their management. Six management methods which are...
Article
Full-text available
Tourism is a major contributor to Australia’s economy. Tourists and their expenditure, from the provision of infrastructure, direct and indirect employment, and opportunities for cultural exchange, impact upon many aspects of Australian life. Even a modest increase in the growth of tourism could see potentially significant benefits accrue in rural...
Article
Full-text available
Australia supports the largest population of free-ranging, one-humped camels Camelus dromedarius in the world, These feral camels originated and bred from camels introduced into Australia up to 160 years ago.With estimated doubling of numbers every eight years, it is believed that in 2007 there may have been over one million feral camels.This has b...
Book
https://www.amazon.ca/Tourism-Development-Local-Poverty-Mountain/dp/3639002733 The work focuses on local poor people. It identifies the correlation between tourism and poverty alleviation by tracing the cash flows to the local poor, reviews the social and environmental effects of tourism on the local area and establishes a community-based sustaina...
Article
Full-text available
In China, protected areas are one of the main destinations attracting tourists and homeland for many poor people living in and around them. Based on a case study, the paper focuses on correlation between tourism and poverty alleviation by tracing the cash flows to the local poor. It also reviews the social and environmental effects of tourism on lo...
Article
Full-text available
In China, protected areas are one of the main destinations attracting tourists and homeland for many poor people living in and around them. Based on a case study, the paper focuses on correlation between tourism and poverty alleviation by tracing the cash flows to the local poor. It also reviews the social and environmental effects of tourism on lo...
Article
This paper is aimed at applying economic theory to agricultural practices, and the principles and methods to build an index system which will estimate the productivity of agricultural economic system were investigated. A series of indices (including six integrated indices) are established. The author calculates those indices in several agricultural...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
The importance of integration of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) into western scientific knowledge system (WS) in NRM has been globally recognised. There has been a lot of research exploring the Indigenous traditional knowledge for environmental management. While sharing many research topics such as environmental philosophy in Indigenous culture and Indigenous participation, the research in different parts of world would have different focuses and interests. For example, in central Australia, where Indigenous people have always a close connection with the desert, such Indigenous traditional knowledge is closely associated with “desert knowledge”. In Taiwan, many studies focus on the relations (including conflicts) between indigenous traditional knowledge and modern environmental management approaches. In China, a lot of studies have concentrated on traditional knowledge protection.
It is believed that the indigenous knowledge from different indigenous communities in different countries would have some differences and similarities. Different researchers from different cultural backgrounds would also have different observations and perspectives on these issues. A comparative study, which involves researchers from different backgrounds, therefore, would be helpful to understand different indigenous cultures and therefore contribute to the integration of traditional knowledge into modern sciences to find the solutions for global environmental crises.
However, there are still some key issues associated with such comparative study, such as:  distinction of the role of TEK in NRM and the implication of integration of TEK into WS for NRM practice, research/practice gaps, and appropriate approaches….
Therefore I would like to ask these questions and expect to get answers, comments and ideas from you. Thank you.
1)      How do you say the role of TEK in NRM and the implication of integration of TEK into WS for NRM practice? Any examples?
2)      What should be done in future research to bridge different TEKs to contribute to fighting against global environmental crises? What are research gaps here?
3)      What do you think appropriate approaches /methodologies for such comparative study would be?

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Goal: In 2008, the World Health Organisation recognised inequalities in health between Aboriginal and non-Indigenous people in Australia as being the largest in the world. Since 2008, the Australian Government has sought to close the gap. However, a decade later socioeconomic disadvantages and trauma, illness, violence, suicide, and community dysfunction are increasing at alarming rates (ABS, 2016; AHMAC, 2017; Dudgeon et al., 2014). The worsening inequalities, largely ensuing from continued colonialization and providing mainstream services based on the medical deficit model, ethnocentrism and institutionalised racism (Came & Griffith, 2017; Dudgeon et al. , 2014; Herring et al., 2013), resulted in the Australian Government (2015) declaring achieving better outcomes for Indigenous peoples as a national research priority. At the same time, a recognition that the increasing incidence of climate change and disasters will exacerbate the disadvantages and problems Indigenous people experience prompted calls to reconcile addressing these inequalities with (re)developing the adaptive capacity required to reduce the risk of extreme natural process and them turning into disasters (UNISDR, 2015). This linkage identifies a need to reconcile the goals of ‘Closing the Gap’ with Australia’s commitments to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR, 2015). The significance of strengthening Indigenous people, knowledges and cultural practices results also from the realisation that increasingly disharmonious relationships with nature are underlying climate change and disasters occurring more frequently and having more serious impacts and that one of the most effective ways to (re)establish harmonious relationships is to draw upon traditional Indigenous knowledges and practices (Buergelt et al., 2017; Grande, 2000; Griffith, 2014; Paton, Buergelt, & Campbell, 2015). In this project, both programs will be joined by Indigenous and non-Indigenous partners from Australia and Taiwan co-developing and co-implementing evidence-based cross-cultural models to create resilient and adaptive citizens and society that have international applicability (UNISDR, 2015). We are using arts (e.g., stories, paintings, songs, dance, carving, ceremony) and Indigenous cultural-ecological tourism to create a safe space for Indigenous Australians and Taiwanese communities to connect and engage in dialogue and joint arts activities, and Indigenous art therapy and arts- and community-based Indigenist participatory action research (ACI-PAR) to deepen the healing and building of individual and collective adaptive capacities whilst engaging in the activities. Engaging in these activities will develop community-based Indigenous cultural tourism ventures, art therapy practitioners and ACI-PAR researchers in the participating communities in ways that benefit the community and nature. Additionally, the Indigenous cultural tourism and art therapy will be expanded to include non-Indigenous people to facilitate transcultural dialogue and learning between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. This expansion will accomplish the shifts/transformations in mindsets required for reconciliation and Western cultures living in harmony with nature and people again.