Benjamin Yguel

Benjamin Yguel

PhD

About

31
Publications
11,181
Reads
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2,388
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2015 - December 2017
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Position
  • PostDoc Position
November 2013 - November 2014
October 2009 - October 2012
Université de Rennes 1/ CNRS
Position
  • PhD

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
Resource use by consumers across patches is often proportional to the quantity or quality of the resource within these patches. In folivores, such proportional use of resources is likely to be more efficient when plants are spatially proximate, such as trees forming a forest canopy. However, resources provided by forest-trees are often not used pro...
Poster
Full-text available
Body size is arguably the single trait that integrates the largest amount of variation of life histories and physiologies across arthropod species. Biogeographic rules relate large body size in arthropods species to large-scale environmental gradients of decreasing temperature or increasing isolation, reflecting decreasing developmental speed and i...
Presentation
Full-text available
Parasites use movements and sensory capabilities in foraging strategies that enable them to track host-resources. Such resource tracking may be limited by spatial isolation of hosts due to limited movements and sensory information. However, even spatially proximate hosts can be difficult to track. We hypothesise that when host-trees in a forest are...
Article
Full-text available
The functioning of present ecosystems reflects deep evolutionary history of locally co‐occurring species if their functional traits show high phylogenetic signal (PS). However, we do not understand what drives local PS. We hypothesize that local PS is high in undisturbed and stressful habitats – either due to ongoing local assembly of species that...
Article
Tropical forests are facing threats that may affect the dynamics of seed dispersers which participate in the forest regeneration. To implement appropriate conservation programs, it appears necessary to monitor seed dispersers and to estimate their response to local changes. Here, we used non-invasive ecoacoustic methods to monitor the activity of a...
Article
Tropical forests harbor the greatest terrestrial biodiversity and provide various ecosystem services. The increaseof human activities on these forests, among which logging, makes the conservation of biodiversity and associatedservices strongly dependent on the sustainability of these activities. However the indicators commonly used toassess the imp...
Article
Full-text available
What leads to classically recognized patterns of biodiversity remains an open and contested question. It remains unknown if observed patterns are generated by biological or non-biological mechanisms, or if we should expect the patterns to emerge in non-biological systems. Here, we employ analogies between GNU/Linux operating systems (distros), a no...
Article
Full-text available
Comparisons between biodiversity and other complex systems can facilitate cross-disciplinary exchange of theories and the identification of key system processes and constraints. For example, due to qualitative structural and functional analogies to biological systems, coupled with good data accessibility, computer operating systems offer opportunit...
Preprint
Full-text available
Comparisons between biodiversity and other complex systems can facilitate cross-disciplinary exchange of theories and the identification of key system processes and constraints. For example, due to qualitative structural and functional analogies to biological systems, coupled with good data accessibility, computer operating systems offer opportunit...
Article
Full-text available
Comparisons between biodiversity and other complex systems can facilitate crossdisciplinary exchange of theories and the identification of key system processes and constraints. For example, due to qualitative structural and functional analogies to biological systems, coupled with good data accessibility, computer operating systems offer opportuniti...
Article
Full-text available
Theory suggests that the structure of evolutionary history represented in a species community may affect its functioning, but phylogenetic diversity metrics do not allow for the identification of major differences in this structure. Here we propose a new metric, ELDERness (for Evolutionary Legacy of DivERsity) to estimate evolutionary branching pat...
Article
Full-text available
Many exotic species have little apparent impact on ecosystem processes, whereas others have dramatic consequences for human and ecosystem health. There is growing evidence that invasions foster eutrophication. We need to identify species that are harmful and systems that are vulnerable to anticipate these consequences. Species’ traits may provide t...
Article
Full-text available
Neighboring plants within a local community may be separated by many millions of years of evolutionary history, potentially reducing enemy pressure by insect herbivores. However, it is not known how the evolutionary isolation of a plant affects the fitness of an insect herbivore living on such a plant, especially the herbivore’s enemy pressure. Her...
Article
Full-text available
Niche conservatism is defined as the conservation of the niche and its associated ecological traits over time. Thus, phylogenetically closely related species tend to occupy similar niches, including abiotic conditions but also biotic interactions. Hence, individuals surrounded by phylogenetically distantly related species could be considered as inh...
Article
Full-text available
Host-plants may rarely leave their ancestral niche and in which case they tend to be surrounded by phylogenetically distant neighbours. Phylogenetically isolated host-plants might share few mutualists with their neighbours and might suffer from a decrease in mutualist support. In addition host plants leaving their ancestral niche might face a deter...
Article
Species within clades are commonly assumed to share similar life history traits, but within a given region some clades show much greater variability in traits than others. Are variable clades older, giving more time for trait diversification? Or do they occupy particular environments, providing a wider range of abiotic or biotic opportunities for t...
Article
Full-text available
Ecology Letters (2011) 14: 1117–1124 Hosts belonging to the same species suffer dramatically different impacts from their natural enemies. This has been explained by host neighbourhood, that is, by surrounding host-species diversity or spatial separation between hosts. However, even spatially neighbouring hosts may be separated by many million year...
Article
Full-text available
Plant traits – the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs – determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. T...
Article
Abstract 1. Resource competition and intra-guild predation (IGP) are important determinants of the structure of aphidophagous guilds. The likelihood and outcome of IGP is influenced by the density of extra-guild prey and the characteristics of the species involved. 2. The nature of intra-guild interactions between alien and indigenous coccinellids...
Article
Full-text available
Cannibalism and intraguild predation (IGP) are both common phenomena amongst aphidophagous coccinellids and serve as vital alternative feeding strategies which can prolong survival during periods of aphid scarcity. A reduction in essential prey density and the acceptance of conspecific or heterospecific prey are likely to have a considerable influe...

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