Benjamin von Bredow

Benjamin von Bredow
Penn State Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine · Department of Pathology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
7,734
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
892
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
685 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - present
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Position
  • Research Intern
September 2012 - July 2013
Harvard Medical School
Position
  • Visiting Fellow
September 2012 - July 2013
Harvard Medical School
Position
  • Visiting Fellow

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
As a consequence of their independent evolutionary origins in apes and Old World monkeys, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency viruses of the SIV smm/mac lineage express phylogenetically and antigenically distinct envelope glycoproteins. Thus, HIV-1 Env-specific antibodies do not typically cross-react with the Env...
Article
Full-text available
Passive administration of HIV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) can protect macaques from hard-to-neutralize (Tier 2) chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. However, conditions for nAb-mediated protection following vaccination have not been established. Here, we selected groups of 6 rhesus macaques with either high or low serum...
Preprint
Full-text available
Passive administration of HIV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) can protect macaques from hard-to-neutralize (Tier 2) chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. However, conditions for nAb-mediated protection following vaccination have not been established. Here, we selected groups of 6 rhesus macaques with either high or low serum...
Article
Full-text available
Certain major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) alleles are associated with spontaneous control of viral replication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)- infected rhesus macaques (RMs). These cases of "elite" control of HIV/SIV replication are often immune-mediated, thereby providin...
Article
The conformation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) substantially impacts antibody recognition and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses. In the absence of the CD4 receptor at the cell surface, primary Envs sample a “closed” conformation that occludes CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes. The virus controls CD4 expression through t...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to control lentivirus replication may be determined, in part, by the extent to which individual viral proteins are targeted by the immune system. Consequently, defining the antigens that elicit the most protective immune responses may facilitate the design of effective HIV-1 vaccines. Here we vaccinated four groups of rhesus macaques wi...
Article
Antibodies recognizing conserved CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes on HIV-1 Env and able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) have been shown to be present in sera from most HIV-1-infected individuals. These antibodies preferentially recognize Env in its CD4-bound conformation. CD4 downregulation by Nef and Vpu dramatically reduces...
Thesis
Antibodies are an essential part of the immune response to HIV infection. Many antibodies that potently neutralize a broad spectrum of HIV isolates have been identified, and passive transfer experiments in animal models have shown their therapeutic potential. It is becoming increasingly clear that Fc-mediated functions, including antibody-dependent...
Article
Full-text available
Importance: Most HIV-1 group M viruses, the main group of HIV-1 responsible for the global AIDS pandemic, use their Vpu proteins to overcome restriction by tetherin (BST-2 or CD317), which is a transmembrane protein that inhibits virus release from infected cells. Here we show that the Nef proteins of certain HIV-1 group M isolates can acquire the...
Article
Full-text available
Although antibodies to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein have been studied extensively for their ability to block viral infectivity, little data is currently available on non-neutralizing functions of these antibodies, such as their ability to eliminate virus-infected cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). HIV-1 Env-specific a...
Article
The cytoplasmic tails of human and simian immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoproteins contain a highly conserved, membrane-proximal endocytosis motif that prevents the accumulation of Env on the surface of infected cells prior to virus assembly. Using an assay designed to measure the killing of virus-infected cells by antibody-dependent cell-medi...
Article
Full-text available
Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies are much sought after (a) to guide vaccine design, both as templates and as indicators of the authenticity of vaccine candidates, (b) to assist in structural studies, and (c) to serve as potential therapeutics. However, the number of targets on the viral envelope spike for such antibodies has been limited. Here,...
Article
Full-text available
Significance HIV-1 viral protein U (Vpu) facilitates virus release from infected cells by down-regulating and degrading tetherin, a transmembrane protein upregulated by IFN that impedes the detachment of enveloped viruses from infected cells. Here we show that this activity of Vpu protects HIV-infected cells from antibodies that are capable of dire...

Network

Cited By