Benjamin Leruth

Benjamin Leruth
University of Groningen | RUG · Department of European Politics and Society

PhD (Politics), LL.M. (European Law)

About

35
Publications
26,832
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Introduction
Benjamin Leruth currently works as an Assistant Professor in European Politics and Society at the University of Groningen. Benjamin does research in Euroscepticism, differentiated integration in the European Union, Social Policy, National Politics and International Relations.
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - June 2014
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Differentiation has been a feature of European integration for more than two decades. Nowadays, more than half of European Union (EU) policies are now implemented in different ways. Recent debates over a potential British exit from the EU revived discussions on the future of European integration, offering a potential case for disintegration. Yet sc...
Article
Full-text available
The existing literature on party and government preferences on Europe mostly focuses on the integration process as a whole. In addition, studies of party-based Euroscepticism tend to offer competing typologies that present some terminological problems. With the increase in differentiation and the potential for disintegration, it is now important to...
Book
Full-text available
Euroscepticism continues to become an increasingly embedded phenomenon within party systems, non-party groups, at the level of public opinion and within the media as the EU enters an uncertain phase. Yet, academic literature has paid little attention to the emergence of, and increased development of, transnational and pan-European networks of EU op...
Article
Full-text available
The Brexit vote of 23 June 2016 is expected to have a profound impact, not only on Britain itself, but also on the remaining 27 member states of the European Union. This article looks at how the Brexit debate was perceived outside of Britain. Was there a sense of understanding for British concerns or was there rather a focus on maintaining unity in...
Article
Full-text available
The Nordic countries constitute an interesting laboratory for the study of differentiated European Integration. Even though Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden share some historical, cultural, socioeconomic and political characteristics , all those countries have ultimately opted for a different kind of relationship with the EU. Whereas F...
Article
Full-text available
Internal political efficacy (that is, beliefs about one’s ability to process and participate effectively in politics) is known to be shaped by factors such as levels of interest in politics, trust in institutions and awareness of political developments and debates. In this article, we show that the task environment also has an impact on internal po...
Article
Full-text available
Differentiation is becoming an increasingly salient feature of European integration. The multi‐faceted European crisis and the subsequent Brexit vote (paving the way for a ground‐breaking case of differentiated disintegration) have led scholars and practitioners to think about the consequences of differentiated integration. This article draws on fi...
Article
Full-text available
In the aftermath of the British referendum to leave the European Union and the European Commission's ‘White Paper on the Future of Europe’, it is not only time to take stock of the existing literature on differentiated integration, but also to rethink the perimeters of disintegration. We argue that phenomena such as Brexit embrace forms of differen...
Article
Full-text available
Modern welfare regimes rest on a range of actors – state, market, family/households, employers and charities – but austerity programmes diminish the contribution of the state. While changes in this ‘welfare mix’ require support from the population, attitude studies have focused mainly on people’s views on state responsibilities, using welfare regim...
Book
Full-text available
This book uses new research in five European countries to show that most people recognize growing inequality, population ageing, paying for health care and pensions, social care and immigration as areas where the welfare state faces real challenges. The most striking findings are the high level of support across all countries for social investment,...
Chapter
The Democratic Forum approach makes a major contribution to understanding what people want from the welfare state and what they think is possible and to the framings that connect their ideas. Our work shows how intergenerational solidarity and support for the core welfare state services (healthcare and pensions) remain resilient across Europe, whil...
Chapter
Full-text available
Neo-liberal ideas exert increasing influence on welfare state policies in Europe. Neo-liberalism values individual interaction in free markets. It argues for welfare state cutbacks and greater individual responsibility and stresses the importance of opportunity. This in turn underscores particular themes in public attitudes (deservingness, obligati...
Chapter
This chapter presents Democratic Forums as a new approach to studying welfare state attitudes that places the naïve assumptions of ordinary people at centre stage and limits the extent to which the pre-conceptions of researchers shape research questions.
Article
Full-text available
This paper uses innovative democratic forums carried out in Germany, Norway, and the United Kingdom to examine people’s ideas about welfare-state priorities and future prospects. We use a moral economy framework in the context of regime differences and the move towards neo-liberalism across Europe. Broadly speaking, attitudes reflect regime differe...
Article
Full-text available
Research using innovative methods to investigate attitudes to welfare futures in Germany, Norway and the UK. This paper uses innovative democratic forums carried out in Germany, Norway and the UK to examine people’s ideas about welfare state priorities and future prospects. We use a moral economy framework in the context of regime differences and t...
Article
Full-text available
The 2015 UK General Election campaign was mostly dominated by the issues of immigration, public debt, and income inequality. While most political parties adopted austerity-led programmes in order to reduce the level of public deficit, their stances on immigration vary significantly despite the two main parties converging on a welfare chauvinist fra...
Article
Full-text available
Welfare attitudes are pivotal in understanding the preferences and demands of citizens to help shape future policy reforms in welfare states. Accordingly, and due to the availability of large scale comparative survey data on attitudes, large numbers of studies of welfare attitudes have emerged during the past few decades. However, some limitations...
Article
Full-text available
This article introduces democratic forums as a method of studying attitudes towards the welfare state, and sets out briefly its strengths and weaknesses in comparison with existing methods. This is done by reporting the findings of a 2015 two‐day forum based in the United Kingdom, in which the future of the welfare state was discussed by a largely...
Article
Full-text available
This article uses deliberative forums to examine attitudes to UK welfare futures. It makes methodological, empirical and theoretical contributions to the field. We demonstrate the value of the approach, provide insights into attitudes, in particular about priorities and how people link ideas together, and show how the UK’s neo-liberal market-centre...
Book
Full-text available
Since the advent of the 1992 Maastricht Treaty, a key turning point in terms of the crystallisation of opposition towards the European Union (EU), Euroscepticism has become a transnational phenomenon. The term ‘Euroscepticism’ has become common political language in all EU member states and, with the advent of the Eurozone, refugee and security cri...
Article
Since the creation of the European Community, the Gaullist movement has never been united over the question of European integration. De Gaulle’s intergovernmental vision of the European project has largely been the dominant discourse. At times however, this narrative has been questioned—on the one hand by more supranational notions of European inte...
Chapter
Previous research has indicated that political radicals and cynics tend to obtain information from like-minded media sources. In this study, we relate media use to political preferences by utilising a cross-national large-N data set collected during the European elections in 2014 through an online opt-in sample and the European Election Studies (EE...
Article
This paper argues that differentiated integration can be understood more thoroughly by using a multi-level approach that conceives of the nation state as an aggregate of partly autonomous subunits and actors. The participation of such components in European integration is influenced by a combination of type of policy through which integration is pu...
Thesis
In the field of European studies, the notion of ‘differentiated integration’ (Stubb 1996) was developed in the late 1990s as an alternative to the crude membership/non-membership dichotomy. While the theoretical benefits of this approach are broadly discussed in the existing literature, further empirical studies have been deemed necessary (Holzinge...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
How European welfare states will develop is hard to predict. People’s current aspirations, ideas and assumptions will be important drivers of change and persistence and of the extent to which conflict and solidarity surround change. We will examine the aspirations, assumptions and priorities that govern the ideas of ordinary people about the future development of welfare in Europe. Much current research is essentially backward-looking. Projections of how welfare states will develop are based largely on analysis of relevant factors such as population ageing, pension and health care costs, changing demands for labour, immigration rates, future spending on human services, global economic developments or the costs of reducing carbon emissions. This approach assumes that the future will follow the patterns of the past. WelfSOC is forward-looking. It examines aspirations for the future, the assumptions underlying current patterns of attitudes, the strength with which positions are held, the arguments used to support them and the emerging cleavages and solidarities between different groups. These factors will be key drivers in the unfolding of the politics of welfare and in shaping the way in which welfare states respond to current policy development and to future pressures. WelfSOC addresses the following three questions: RQ1: What are the aspirations of ordinary citizens when they look to the future of state welfare in their children’s Europe, what are their priorities and how strongly are they held? How are preferences justified? RQ2: What assumptions and values underlie the pattern of aspirations? How do people understand the factors driving change? How do fiscal and other constraints enter into people’s views on the welfare state? RQ3: How does the changing social, political and economic context of welfare policy interact with people’s expectations and attitudes? What cleavages and solidarities are emerging?
Project
This Collaborative Research Network, funded by the University Association for Contemporary European Studies (UACES) and founded by Benjamin Leruth, Stefan Gänzle and Jarle Trondal, aims at bringing together scholars interested in flexible and differentiated integration in the European Union following the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union on 23 June 2016. More information here: https://differentiated-integration.eu/
Project
This Handbook (edited by Nicholas Startin, Simon Usherwood and myself) includes 36 chapters written by 47 leading scholars in the field. It will be published by Routledge around June 2017. The table of contents (with the list of contributors) will be added soon.