Benjamin Dauphin

Benjamin Dauphin
Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL | WSL · Ecological Genetics

PhD

About

33
Publications
17,730
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1,473
Citations
Citations since 2017
30 Research Items
1451 Citations
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Publications

Publications (33)
Article
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Delivering material selected for breeding purposes into the wild in the context of sustainable forest management might reduce the levels of genetic diversity of future forests in comparison to that of natural populations. Another consequence might be a reduction of their resilience under uncertain future climatic and socio-economic conditions if th...
Preprint
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Past environmental changes have shaped the demographic history and genetic diversity of natural populations, yet the timescale and strength of these effects have not been investigated systematically and simultaneously for multiple phylogenetically distant species. We performed comparative population genomic analyses and demographic inference for se...
Article
Detecting the extrinsic selective pressures shaping genomic variation is critical for a better understanding of adaptation and for forecasting evolutionary responses of natural populations to changing environmental conditions. With increasing availability of geo-referenced environmental data, landscape genomics provides unprecedented insights into...
Article
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Global warming is pushing populations outside their range of physiological tolerance. According to the environmental envelope framework, the most vulnerable populations occur near the climatic edge of their species' distributions. In contrast, populations from the climatic center of the species range should be relatively buffered against climate wa...
Article
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Climate change is increasing the frequency and intensity of drought events in many boreal forests. Trees are sessile organisms with a long generation time, which makes them vulnerable to fast climate change and hinders fast adaptations. Therefore, it is important to know how forests cope with drought stress and to explore the genetic basis of these...
Article
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Burgundy truffles are heterothallic ascomycetes that grow in symbiosis with trees. Despite their esteemed belowground fruitbodies, the species’ complex lifecycle is still not fully understood. Here, we present the genetic patterns in three natural Burgundy truffle populations based on genotyped fruitbodies, ascospore extracts, and ectomycorrhizal r...
Article
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Premise: The great variation of genome size (C-value) across land plants is linked to various adaptative features. Flow cytometry (FCM), the standard approach to estimating C-values, relies mostly on fresh materials, performing poorly when used with herbarium materials. No fern C-value reports have been derived from herbarium specimens; however, t...
Article
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Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi associated with plants constitute one of the most successful symbiotic interactions in forest ecosystems. ECM support trophic exchanges with host plants and are important factors for the survival and stress resilience of trees. However, ECM clades often harbour morpho‐species and cryptic lineages, with weak morphological...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi associated with plants constitute one of the most successful symbiotic interactions in forest ecosystems. ECM support trophic exchanges with host plants and are important factors for the survival and stress resilience of trees. However, ECM clades often harbour morpho-species and cryptic lineages, with weak morphological...
Article
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Ferns are the second most diverse group of land plants after angiosperms. Extant species occupy a wide range of habitats and contribute significantly to ecosystem functioning. Despite the importance of ferns, most taxa are poorly covered by genomic resources and within‐species studies based on high‐resolution markers are entirely lacking. The genus...
Article
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In nature conservation, there is keen interest in predicting how populations will respond to environmental changes such as climate change. These predictions can help determine whether a population can be self‐sustaining under future alterations of its habitat or whether it may require human intervention such as protection, restoration, or assisted...
Article
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Background: Progress in the field of evolutionary forest ecology has been hampered by the huge challenge of phenotyping trees across their ranges in their natural environments, and the limitation in high-resolution environmental information. Findings: The GenTree Platform contains phenotypic and environmental data from 4,959 trees from 12 ecolog...
Article
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Motivation: Trait variation within species can reveal plastic and/or genetic responses to environmental gradients, and may indicate where local adaptation has occurred. Here, we present a dataset of rangewide variation in leaf traits from seven of the most ecologically and economically important tree species in Europe. Sample collection and trait a...
Article
The ongoing increase in global temperature affects biodiversity, especially in mountain regions where climate change is exacerbated. As sessile, long‐lived organisms, trees are especially challenged in terms of adapting to rapid climate change. Here, we show that low rates of allele frequency shifts in Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra) occurring near...
Article
It is generally accepted that the spatial distribution of neutral genetic diversity within a species’ native range mostly depends on effective population size, demographic history, and geographic position. However, it is unclear how genetic diversity at adaptive loci correlates with geographic peripherality or with habitat suitability within the ec...
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An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
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Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play central roles in terrestrial ecosystems by interacting with both above and belowground communities as well as by influencing edaphic properties. The AMF communities associated with the roots of the fern Botrychium lunaria (Ophioglossaceae) were sampled in four transects at 2400 m a.s.l. in the Swiss Alps and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ferns are the second most dominant group of land plants after angiosperms. Extant species occupy an extensive range of habitats and contribute significantly to ecosystem functioning. Despite the importance of ferns, most taxa are poorly covered by genomic resources. The genus Botrychium belongs to the family Ophioglossaceae, one of the earliest div...
Article
Full-text available
The dataset presented here was collected by the GenTree project (EU-Horizon 2020), which aims to improve the use of forest genetic resources across Europe by better understanding how trees adapt to their local environment. This dataset of individual tree-core characteristics including ring-width series and whole-core wood density was collected for...
Article
Despite decreasing sequencing costs, whole‐genome sequencing for population‐based genome scans for selection is still prohibitively expensive for organisms with large genomes. Moreover, the repetitive nature of large genomes often represents a challenge in bioinformatic and downstream analyses. Here we use in‐depth transcriptome sequencing to desig...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite decreasing sequencing costs, whole-genome sequencing for population-based genome scans for selection is still prohibitively expensive for organisms with large genomes. Moreover, the repetitive nature of large genomes often represents a challenge in bioinformatic and downstream analyses. Here we use in-depth transcriptome sequencing to desig...
Article
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The moonwort genus, Botrychium s. s., includes diploid and polyploid taxa that occur primarily in the northern hemisphere. Their evolutionary history, morphologically cryptic taxa and deep divergence of the family in the phylogeny of ferns has long fascinated pteridologists. Previous molecular studies did not include a complete taxonomic sampling o...
Article
Polyploidy is a major speciation process in vascular plants, and is postulated to be particularly important in shaping the diversity of extant ferns. However, limitations in the availability of bi-parental markers for ferns have greatly limited phylogenetic investigation of polyploidy in this group. With a large number of allopolyploid species, the...
Article
Full-text available
Phylogeny has long informed pteridophyte classification. As our ability to infer evolutionary trees has improved, classifications aimed at recognizing natural groups have become increasingly predictive and stable. Here, we provide a modern, comprehensive classification for lycophytes and ferns, down to the genus level, utilizing a community-based a...
Article
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Recent cytological and molecular studies have investigated genome size variation and evolution in the homosporous ferns, but representatives of the Ophioglossaceae were largely overlooked, despite their evolutionary singularity. Flow cytometry analysis was performed on 41 individuals of eight species of the genera Botrychium (B.), Botrypus, and Sce...
Article
Full-text available
Previous phylogenetic studies of moonworts (Botrychium sensu stricto (s.s.)) included few taxa from outside of North America. This low geographical representation limited interpretations of relationships of this group rich in cryptic species. With 18 out of 30 species in the genus being polyploid, understanding their evolutionary history remains a...

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Project (1)
Project
Botrychium ! Ophioglossaceae. Please contact: jason.grant@unine.ch