Benjamin Brugman

Benjamin Brugman
Arizona State University | ASU

Doctor of Philosophy

About

4
Publications
171
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3
Citations
Introduction
I use static and dynamic loading to study materials at high pressure (~Mbars). I'm interested in the deformation, strength, and phase equilibria of materials as a function of pressure and strain rate.
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
Michigan State University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Strength and deformation of rare gas solids and hard ceramics using x-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell. Dynamic strength of chondrites and silicates using laser-driven shock loading.
September 2013 - January 2016
Michigan State University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Weathering and alteration of Mars meteorites and Mars-relevant analog materials. TEM/EDX geochemical analysis, SEM image analysis.
September 2013 - May 2016
Michigan State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • GLG 201 Dynamic Earth, GLG 321 Mineralogy, GLG 431 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy: Developed and taught laboratory mineralogy and sedimentology exercises, grading, lecture coverage as needed, assisted with field trips in Indiana and Michigan.
Education
September 2013 - May 2020
Michigan State University
Field of study
  • Mineral Physics
August 2006 - May 2012
Arizona State University
Field of study
  • Earth And Space Exploration, Mathematics Minor
September 2004 - May 2006
Rio Salado College
Field of study
  • General Studies

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Elastic and plastic properties of materials and phase transitions at extreme conditions vary with both hydrostatic pressure and deviatoric stress. To generate and measure controlled deviatoric stress at pressures beyond those accessible with large volume differential and rotational presses and optical access for spectroscopy, experiments tested the...
Article
Strength, texture, and equation of state of hexagonal tungsten monocarbide (WC) have been determined under quasi-hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic compression to 66 GPa using angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell. Quasi-hydrostatic compression in a Ne pressure medium demonstrates that nanocrystalline WC is slightly less incompr...