Bene Bassetti

Bene Bassetti
University of Birmingham · School of Education

PhD, AFBPsS, FCIL, FHEA, CL, CPsychol

About

37
Publications
49,257
Reads
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798
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - August 2018
The University of Warwick
Position
  • Associate professor
September 2010 - August 2014
The University of York
Position
  • Assistant professor

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
It is generally assumed that speakers of grammatical gender languages consider grammatical gender arbitrary, but this assumption has never been tested. Research shows that the grammatical gender of nouns can affect perceptions of the masculinity or femininity of the noun's referent in speakers of languages with masculine and feminine noun classes....
Article
Full-text available
Orthographic forms (spellings) can affect pronunciation in a second language (L2); however, it is not known whether the same orthographic form can affect both L2 pronunciation and metalinguistic awareness. To test this, we asked 260 speakers of English—first‐language (L1) English speakers, L1 Italian and L2 English sequential bilinguals, and L1 Ita...
Article
Full-text available
Aims: This article reviews recent research on the relationship between language and thinking in bilinguals. Approach: The paper reviews aspects of previous research, and links it to the articles in this special issue. Conclusions: Research on language and cognition in bilinguals requires both depth (in-depth investigations of one area in order t...
Article
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No recent studies have investigated language effects on counterfactual reasoning in bilinguals. This paper investigates the impact of bilinguals’ native language and language of testing on counterfactual reasoning, addressing two questions: (1) Do older Chinese reasoners, educated before English became a school subject, draw different inferences, o...
Article
Full-text available
The orthographic forms (spellings) of second language (L2) words and sounds affect the pronunciation and awareness of L2 sounds, even after lengthy naturalistic exposure. This study investigated whether instruction could reduce the effects of English orthographic forms on Italian native speakers’ pronunciation and awareness of L2 English sounds. It...
Article
Full-text available
The orthographic forms of words (spellings) can affect word production in speakers of second languages. This study tested whether presenting orthographic forms during L2 word learning can lead speakers to learn non-nativelike phonological forms of L2 words, as reflected in production and metalinguistic awareness. Italian L1 learners of English as a...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing evidence that the orthographic forms (spellings) of second language words affect second language (L2) speech production, but it is not known whether orthography affects L2 phonology in native users of a non-alphabetic writing system. To answer this question, this study tested the effects of number of letters on the duration of cons...
Article
Full-text available
Bassetti, Sokolović-Perović, Mairano, & Cerni (2018, online first) Orthography-induced length contrasts in the second language phonological systems of L2 speakers of English: Evidence from minimal pairs. Language and Speech. Abstract Research shows that the orthographic forms ('spellings') of second language (L2) words affect speech production in L...
Article
Full-text available
Calendar calculations-e.g., calculating the nth month after a certain month-are an important component of temporal cognition, and can vary cross-linguistically. English speakers rely on a verbal list representation-processing system. Chinese speakers-whose calendar terms are numerically transparent-rely on a more efficient numerical system. Does kn...
Article
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Second languages (L2s) are often learned through spoken and written input, and L2 orthographic forms (spellings) can lead to non-native-like pronunciation. The present study investigated whether orthography can lead experienced learners of EnglishL2 to make a phonological contrast in their speech production that does not exist in English. Double co...
Article
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Interword spacing facilitates English native readers but not native readers of Chinese, a writing system that does not mark word boundaries. L1-English readers of Chinese as a Second Language (CSL) could then be facilitated if spacing is added between words in Chinese materials. However, previous studies produced inconsistent results. This study te...
Article
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Aims and objectives/purpose/research questions This article reviews recent research on how speaking a language that marks gender grammatically might affect thinking, and on the relationship between grammatical gender knowledge of more than one language, and thinking, in both early and emergent bilinguals. Design/methodology/approach The paper prov...
Article
Full-text available
Recently researchers have become increasingly interested in the influence of or-thographic forms on second language (L2) phonology. Orthographic forms (or spellings) represent the sounds and words of a language in writing. L2 learn-ers, in particular those in instructed settings, are simultaneously exposed to the orthographic forms and the phonolog...
Article
Full-text available
In spite of burgeoning evidence that the orthographic forms ("spellings") of second language (L2) words affect L2 learners' pronunciation, little is known about the pronunciation of known words in experienced learners. In a series of four studies, we investigated various orthographic effects on the pronunciation of L2 English words in instructed le...
Chapter
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Spelling means representing a language in writing by using the letters of an alphabet according to conventions.
Chapter
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Vivian James Cook (born June 13, 1940) is an English applied linguist who investigates second language acquisition, and especially multicompetence. He holds a Chair in Applied Linguistics at Newcastle University, UK.
Article
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Two experiments tested the role of morphemic information and interword spacing in reading in experienced and inexperienced Chinese readers. Chinese is normally written in hanzi, or characters, which mostly represent monosyllabic morphemes, but it can also be written in pinyin, or romanised Chinese, which represents phonemes and is word-spaced. Whil...
Article
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This article provides an introduction to a special issue of Writing Systems Research on second language writing systems. Aside from introducing the contributions to the special issue it lays out central themes and questions.
Article
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In recent years writing systems has emerged as a distinct area of research, driven by cross-linguistic studies of the acquisition or use of literacy and its cognitive repercussions, by the novel forms of language use developing in computer-mediated com- munication, and by sociolinguistic explorations of written language as a marker of identity, amo...
Article
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English is written with interword spacing, and eliminating it negatively affects English readers. Chinese is written without interword spacing, and adding it does not facilitate Chinese readers. Pinyin (romanized Chinese) is written with interword spacing. This study investigated whether adding interword spacing facilitates reading in Chinese nativ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Copyright Notice The documents distributed here have been provided as a means to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work on a noncommercial basis. Copyright and all rights therein are maintained by the authors or by other copyright holders, notwithstanding that they have offered their works here electronically. It is understood...
Article
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This paper investigates whether bilinguals' and monolinguals' concepts of entities differ when the bilinguals' two languages provide two different representations of the same entity. Previous research shows that speakers of languages that have a grammatical gender system think of objects as being masculine or feminine in line with the grammatical g...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides evidence that the hanyu pinyin representation of the phonology of Chinese affects the production of Chinese phonology in instructed learners of Chinese as a Foreign Language. Pinyin generally has a one-to-one correspondence between graphemes and phonemes, but its transcription of some Chinese rimes does not represent the main vo...
Article
Full-text available
Cross-linguistic research shows that some aspects of metalinguistic awareness are affected by characteristics of different writing systems. Users of writing systems that mark word boundaries (such as English) develop word awareness, while users of unspaced writing systems (such as Chinese) do not. Previous research showed that English-speaking user...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides evidence that the second language orthographic input affects the mental representations of L2 phonology in instructed beginner L2 learners. Previous research has shown that orthographic representations affect monolinguals' performance in phonological awareness tasks; in instructed L2 learners such representations could also affe...
Article
Full-text available
An experiment investigated whether Japanese speakers’ categorisation of objects and substances as shape or material is influenced by acquiring English, based on Imai and Gentner (1997). Subjects were presented with an item such as a cork pyramid and asked to choose between two other items that matched it for shape (plastic pyramid) or for material...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Does knowledge of more than one language affect the way people think? Linguistic relativism says that, since different languages represent reality differently, the languages we know may affect how we think about reality. Knowing more than one (spoken or written) language then means having more than one representation of reality, and therefore thinking differently -- about language itself, and about entities and events. I've co-authored two overviews of the topic (Bassetti & Cook, 2011; Bassetti & Filipovic, 2021), and investigated various issues, including: - the concept of 'word' in English learners of L2 Chinese - perceptions of femininity/masculinity of animals and objects in Italian learners/users of L2 German (see my project) - the categorisation of English consonants in Italian learners/users of L2 English
Archived project
To investigate the relationship between the absence of interword spacing and the concept of 'word' in native and second language users of Chinese, and whether adding spacing between words facilitates reading in Chinese
Project
To investigate whether there is a link between the grammatical gender of a noun and conceptualisation of the noun's referent as masculine or feminine in native, second language, and bilingual speakers of languages with grammatical gender.