Ben Mather

Ben Mather
The University of Sydney · School of Geosciences

PhD

About

13
Publications
4,897
Reads
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106
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
106 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Introduction
I am a computational geophysicist at the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney. I am interested in the inversion of thermochemical properties of the lithosphere subject to available geophysical data and their uncertainties. Inversions that couple multiple datasets ultimately improve the precision and understanding of the thermochemical evolution of the Earth.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - present
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Computational Geophysicist
June 2017 - October 2018
Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2016 - June 2017
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
March 2012 - February 2016
University of Melbourne
Field of study
  • Earth Science
February 2007 - November 2011
Monash University (Australia)
Field of study
  • Earth Science

Publications

Publications (13)
Preprint
The Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) separate the warmer lithosphere of the West Antarctic rift system and the colder East Antarctic craton. Low velocity zones beneath the TAM imaged in recent seismological studies have been interpreted as warm low-density mantle material, suggesting a strong contribution of thermal support to the uplift of the TAM....
Article
The Big Island of Hawai'i is currently the most active site of magmatic activity in the Hawaiian chain of volcanoes that are associated with a mantle plume in the Pacific Ocean. Mantle source variability and magmatic processes have both been proposed to significantly affect lava chemistry on the Big Island, which is most prominently illustrated in...
Article
Concealed deep beneath the oceans is a carbon conveyor belt, propelled by plate tectonics. Our understanding of its modern functioning is underpinned by direct observations, but its variability through time has been poorly quantified. Here we reconstruct oceanic plate carbon reservoirs and track the fate of subducted carbon using thermodynamic mode...
Article
Full-text available
Numerical models of groundwater flow play a critical role for water management scenarios under climate extremes. Large-scale models play a key role in determining long range flow pathways from continental interiors to the oceans, yet struggle to simulate the local flow patterns offered by small-scale models. We have developed a highly scalable nume...
Article
Full-text available
Long-lived, widespread intraplate volcanism without age progression is one of the most controversial features of plate tectonics. Previously proposed edge-driven convection, asthenospheric shear, and lithospheric detachment fail to explain the ~5000-km-wide intraplate volcanic province from eastern Australia to Zealandia. We model the subducted sla...
Article
Full-text available
Earth's upper mantle, as sampled by mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) at oceanic spreading centers, has developed chemical and isotopic heterogeneity over billions of years through focused melt extraction and re-enrichment by recycled crustal components. Chemical and isotopic heterogeneity of MORB is dwarfed by the large compositional spectrum of lav...
Article
Full-text available
The variation of temperature in the crust is difficult to quantify due to the sparsity of surface heat flow observations and lack of measurements on the thermal properties of rocks at depth. We examine the degree to which the thermal structure of the crust can be constrained from Curie depth and surface heat flow data in Southeastern Australia. We...
Article
Full-text available
Curie depth offers a valuable constraint on the thermal structure of the lithosphere, based on its interpretation as the depth to 580 ∘C, but current methods underestimate the range of uncertainty. We formulate the estimation of Curie depth within a Bayesian framework to quantify its uncertainty across the British Isles. Uncertainty increases expon...
Article
Full-text available
Curie depth offers a valuable constraint on the thermal structure of the lithosphere, based on its interpretation as the depth to 580 °C, but current methods underestimate the range of uncertainty. We formulate the estimation of Curie depth within a Bayesian framework to quantify its uncertainty across the British Isles. Uncertainty increases expon...
Article
Full-text available
Regions where surface temperature has increased since past glaciation events, such as Ireland, underestimate the heat output of the Earth unless palaeoclimate corrections are applied. We apply probabilistic techniques to quantify the uncertainty of 22 palaeoclimate‐corrected heat flow estimates in Ireland, which assimilate multiple surface temperat...
Article
Full-text available
The surface heat flow field in Australia has for many years been poorly constrained compared to continental regions elsewhere. 182 recent heat flow determinations and 66 new heat production measurements for Southeastern Australia significantly increase our understanding of local and regional lithospheric thermal regimes and allow for detailed therm...

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Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The ARC Research Hub for Basin Geodynamics and Evolution of Sedimentary Systems (Basin Genesis Hub) is a showcase of connecting “Big Data” analysis and high-performance computing in an open innovation framework. The hub will fuse multidimensional data into 5D basin models (space and time, with uncertainty estimates) by coupling the evolution of mantle flow, crustal deformation, erosion and sedimentary processes using open-source modelling tools. http://www.earthbyte.org/the-basin-genesis-hub/