Ben Cipollini

Ben Cipollini
University of California, San Diego | UCSD · Department of Computer Science and Engineering (CSE)

Ph.D

About

17
Publications
2,257
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137
Citations
Citations since 2016
8 Research Items
120 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025

Publications

Publications (17)
Preprint
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Rilling & Insel have argued that in primates, bigger brains have proportionally fewer anatomical interhemispheric connections, leading to reduced functional connectivity between the hemispheres (1). They based this on a comparison between surface areas of the corpus callosum and cortex rather than estimating connection counts, while leaving out oth...
Conference Paper
The existence of left-right asymmetries in classification of visual stimuli has been established by a long history of behavioral experiments and neuroimaging studies. The Double Filtering by Frequency (DFF) model accounts for experimental data from four key publications, but offers no neural basis for a spatial frequency processing asymmetry it pos...
Conference Paper
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Table of contents I1 Introduction to the 2015 Brainhack Proceedings R. Cameron Craddock, Pierre Bellec, Daniel S. Margules, B. Nolan Nichols, Jörg P. Pfannmöller A1 Distributed collaboration: the case for the enhancement of Brainspell’s interface AmanPreet Badhwar, David Kennedy, Jean-Baptiste Poline, Roberto Toro A2 Advancing open science through...
Article
The left and right sides of the brain differ in how they process visual stimuli such as words & faces, local & global aspects of Navon stimuli, high & low frequency gratings, even illusory contours. Our "differential encoding" autoencoder model suggests these differences can be explained by an asymmetry in the average length of long-range lateral c...
Preprint
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Urbanization presents unique environmental challenges to human commensal species. The Afrotropical Anopheles gambiae complex contains a number of synanthropic mosquito species that are major vectors of malaria. To examine ongoing cryptic diversification within the complex, we performed reduced representation sequencing on 941 mosquitoes collected a...
Article
Full-text available
Humans achieve fast and accurate recognition of complex objects through the ventral visual stream, a system of interconnected brain regions capable of hierarchical processing of increasingly complex features. In the feedforward view of the ventral visual stream, processing starts at the primary
Article
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Significance We show that the functional coordination between the two hemispheres of the brain is maintained by strong and stable interactions of a specific subset of connections between homotopic regions. Our data suggest that the stability of those functional interactions is mediated in part by the direct anatomical projections of large, highly m...
Conference Paper
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Background / Purpose: We aim to address the question of whether face and object recognition are independent by using a neurocomputational modeling approach. We modeled Gauthier et al. (in press) 's psychological experiment using "The Model" ™. Main conclusion: The results of our model show that as experience grows, the shared variance between...
Conference Paper
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Background / Purpose: Visual processing is lateralized; we implement a neurally plausible model of an anatomical asymmetry to account for hemispheric differences. The asymmetry, in the spatial spread of long-range lateral connections, ties together local/global, face processing, and contour processing asymmetries. Main conclusion: Our model re...
Article
Full-text available
Lateralization of function touches the things we think make us most human: language, use of our hands, our emotions, and how we perceive the world through our eyes. Current theory postulates that lateralization of visual function is due to an underlying asymmetry in the processing of spatial frequency information (Ivry & Robertson, 1998). However,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: What is the origin of spatial frequency differences between the hemispheres? The literature documents a left hemisphere advantage for processing high spatial frequencies, and the left hemisphere low spatial frequencies. Main conclusion: We show that lateralization in contour processing, due to differences in the mean leng...
Article
Full-text available
Hemispheric asymmetry in the processing of local and global features has been argued to originate from differences in frequency filtering in the two hemispheres, with little neurophysiological support. Here we test the hypothesis that this asymmetry takes place at an encoding stage beyond the sensory level, due to asymmetries in anatomical connecti...
Conference Paper
Left-right asymmetries have been noted in tasks requiring the classification of many visual stimuli, including Navon figures, spatial frequency gratings, and faces. The Double Filtering by Frequency (DFF) model (Ivry & Robertson, 1998), which postulates asymmetric frequency filtering on task-relevant frequency bands, has been implemented to account...

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