Bela Bodo

Bela Bodo
University of Bonn | Uni Bonn · Institute of History

Ph.D.

About

23
Publications
5,223
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87
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
42 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the memory of political violence after WWI in Hungary from 1919 to 2020.
Article
On April 6, 1941, Nazi Germany, Italy, Hungary, and Bulgaria invaded Yugoslavia. As recompense for its participation in the Nazi invasion, the Budapest government annexed the Vojvodina region, which had been part of the Kingdom of Hungary before 1918. The annexation and the ethnic cleansing that followed pushed local partisan units to attack Hungar...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the memory of the Red and White Terrors as they relate to public monuments after the collapse of state socialism. It shows how the memory of political violence has been exploited and instrumentalized by various actors to achieve political and cultural ends, and the role of civic organizations and private individuals in keeping...
Article
Full-text available
It looks the valiant attempt of the Karolyi government to save Hungarian Jews in the context of worsening relations with Nazi Germany, Romania and Slovakia in the final years of the war.
Article
T he dissolution of the A ustro- H ungarian E mpire in the fall of 1918 inaugurated a period of rapid change in East Central Europe. Independent Hungary, which emerged as one of the “successor states” to the Dual Monarchy, experienced two revolutions in ten months. However, neither the democratic regime, born in the October Revolution of 1918, nor...
Article
This article examines the social context of paramilitary violence and scrutinizes the motives of the perpetrators in Hungary between 1919 and 1921 in a social context. The atrocities committed against middle-class Jews, the article argues, was primarily motivated by greed rather than ethnic and religious hatred; they were favored by the "retreat of...
Article
KatusLászló. Hungary in the Dual Monarchy, 1867–1914. Translated by BődyPaul and GaneAndrew T.. East European Monographs 738. Boulder, CO: Social Science Monographs, 2008. Pp. 549, tables, charts, maps. - Volume 43 - Béla Bodó
Article
This essay examines the life, political career and the moral and intellectual universe of Deputy Colonel Baron Pál Prónay, the most important paramilitary leader in Hungary after the First World War. In historical memory and public imagination, Prónay’s name is associated with militia, mob and state violence often described by contemporary liberals...
Article
Full-text available
The Hungarian Republic, which emerged from of the ashes of Austria-Hungary, experienced two revolutions between October 1918 and April 1919. However, neither the democratic regime nor the more radical Soviet Republic born in these revolutions was able to solve the country's most pressing economic and social problems. The collapse of the Soviet Repu...
Article
Full-text available
This article looks at the response of the aristocracy to militia and mob violence in Hungary between 1919 and 1922. It argues that the experience with radical paramilitary groups in the era after the first world war colored the political behavior of the aristocracy and its political representatives, especially in their attitude to fascism, in the 1...
Chapter
Historians of Nazi Germany regularly complain of their difficulty in keeping up with new literature in their field. The number of books published on Nazi foreign policy alone indeed runs into the hundreds, nonetheless, the majority focus on a limited number of themes: continuity and discontinuity in German foreign policy from Bismarck to Hitler; th...
Article
This article looks at the history of the medical inspection and biological selection of students in the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany. It discusses the emergence of regular medical inspection of various social groups, including students, in the 1920s and explains why the Nazis were so eager to make health inspections--complete with anthropologic...
Article
This article examines the social causes of the infamous Tiszazug murders (i.e., the poisoning of more than forty people, mainly men, by their female relatives) in interwar Hungary. First, it looks at those elements in peasant culture, such as the traditional neglect of the sick elderly and the disabled, which proved conducive to a violent solution...