Beckye Stanton

Beckye Stanton
California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) · Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment

Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Toxicology; University of California, Davis

About

16
Publications
2,553
Reads
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86
Citations
Citations since 2016
10 Research Items
40 Citations
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Introduction
Beckye Stanton currently works at the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA). Beckye has research in Toxicology, Marine Biology, and Ecology and is currently working on harmful algal blooms in marine and freshwater systems.
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - present
OEHHA
Position
  • Staff Toxicologist
Description
  • marine and freshwater HABs
November 2017 - July 2019
OEHHA
Position
  • Researcher
May 2016 - November 2017
Sacamento - San Joaquin Delta Conservancy
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • habitat restoration, water quality, invasive plant monitoring and treatment
Education
September 1996 - September 2002
University of California, Davis
Field of study
  • avian toxicology
August 1992 - May 1996
Calvin College
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (16)
Technical Report
Full-text available
Patterns of blooms of certain types of algae in California coastal waters have been changing. While no trend is evident, blooms are known to be influenced in part by warming ocean temperatures. For example, red tide-forming dinoflagellates have been appearing more frequently since 2018. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) can produce biotoxins or oth...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Cyanobacteria are microscopic, photosynthetic organisms that are found naturally in all aquatic environments. Under certain conditions, cyanobacteria can multiply and become very abundant, discoloring the water throughout a water body, producing and releasing cyanotoxins into the environment. A companion to ITRC's first Harmful Cyanobacterial Bloom...
Article
In recent decades, cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) have increased in magnitude, frequency, and duration in freshwater ecosystems. CyanoHABs can impact water quality by the production of potent toxins known as cyanotoxins. Environmental exposure to cyanotoxins has been associated with severe illnesses in humans, domestic animals, and...
Presentation
Members of several Interstate and Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC) teams collaborated on an over-arching Risk Communication Toolkit. This toolkit provides an overview, resources, and examples for risk communication planning and stakeholder outreach. While many aspects of the toolkit are applicable to harmful cyanobacteria blooms (HCBs), the...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This guidance is focused on strategies that you may use in response to cyanobacterial blooms that are found in freshwater aquatic environments, including lakes, streams, rivers, reservoirs, ponds, and freshwater-influenced estuaries. It is intended to help you select monitoring, excess nutrient reduction, in-lake management, and communication appro...
Poster
Full-text available
Federal action levels for domoic acid (DA) in seafood drive federal and state efforts to protect human health. Action levels are tissue-specific, with 30 ppm for Dungeness Crab viscera and 20 ppm for all other seafood, including Dungeness Crab meat. California applies the Dungeness Crab viscera action limit of 30 ppm to Rock Crab viscera. Existing...
Article
Following the spill of bunker fuel oil (IFO 380, approximately 1,500-3,000 L) into San Francisco Bay in October 2009, PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) concentrations in mussels from moderately oiled areas increased up to 87,554 ng/g (dry wt.) and, 3 months later, decreased to concentrations found in mussels collected prior to oiling with a bio...
Article
The understanding of Cd impacts to avian species has been improved by recent studies and the extensive literature review completed as part of the development of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs). Therefore, we sought to update the Cd toxicity reference value (TRV) for birds used by regulatory age...
Article
Treatment of chickens as pre-incubation embryos with TCDD or PCB-126 altered fatty acid concentrations in their plasma 21 days later, compared with their oil vehicles (sunflower and corn oils, respectively). TCDD increased the concentrations of total fatty acids, lipid classes (phospholipids and cholesterol ester), fatty acid families (saturated, n...
Article
This study investigated the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-rho-dioxin (TCDD) and estrogen on plasma lipids in immature male chickens. Fatty acids were quantified in plasma collected on day 14 from chickens injected with either: Estrogen plus TCDD-1 mg estradiol cypionate /kg body wt. daily for 3 days and 50 microg TCDD/kg body wt. on day 4;...
Article
This study tested the hypothesis that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) antagonizes estrogen-induced hepatic lipid synthesis and metabolism in birds. Twenty immature male chickens (Gallus domesticus) were divided evenly into four groups: (1) vehicle control; (2) estrogen alone (1.0 mg/kg estradiol cypionate injected on three consecutive da...
Article
The interaction of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and estrogen was studied in chickens to more clearly define this relationship in an avian species and its role in the enhanced sensitivity of female chickens to TCDD-induced wasting syndrome. Twenty male chickens (7-9 weeks old) were divided evenly into four groups: control (CTL, receive...

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Projects

Projects (8)
Project
https://trackingcalifornia.org/calwatch/calwatch-project
Project
Guidance and training on benthic HCBs.