Beatrice Okyere-Manu

Beatrice Okyere-Manu
University of KwaZulu-Natal | ukzn · School of Religion, Philosophy and Classics

Doctor of Applied Ethics

About

27
Publications
22,500
Reads
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42
Citations
Citations since 2016
23 Research Items
41 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022051015
2016201720182019202020212022051015
Introduction
Beatrice Okyere-Manu currently works at the School of Religion, Philosophy and Classics, University of KwaZulu-Natal. Beatrice does research in mMigration, Population ethics, Professional Ethics, African feminist ethics, Comparative Religion and Abrahamic Religions. Their most recent publication is 'Who is umuntu in Umuntu ngumuntu ngabantu ? Interrogating moral issues facing Ndau women in polygyny'.
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - May 2017
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Position
  • Lecturer/Ethics Studies Coordinator
Education
January 2004 - April 2011
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Field of study
  • Ethics

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
This paper presents a review of papers on the cultural, ethical and religious perspectives on Environmental preservation. All over the world, the negative effects of the current environmental crisis on people’s lives and livelihoods cannot be disputed. The mismanagement of the environment has resulted in the extreme climate change currently faced b...
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The chapter presents a critical survey of what some churches in Ghana are doing or have done to help address the climate change phenomenon and what more is left to be done to fully harness the unique influence and prestigious advantage churches in Ghana have within the general population. The chapter argues that the Church’s almost ubiquitous prese...
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The African ethics of Ubuntu has not only existed and guided the moral behavior of traditional African people but has shown itself to be relevant to modern African societies and adaptive to the current socio-political challenges of the African people and beyond. As a result, the chapter aims to test the resilience of the ethics of Ubuntu in the fac...
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This chapter's position is that our moral understanding of responsibility and stewardship can contribute to improving the religio-cultural healing practices (ethnomedicine) and the natural environment's well-being. This is because anthropogenic activities have contributed to environmental degradation being experienced today, resulting in various ec...
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Full-text available
A virtual community is generally described as a group of people with shared interests, ideas, and goals in a particular digital group or virtual platform. Virtual communities have become ubiquitous in recent times, and almost everyone belongs to one or multiple virtual communities. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, with its associated national lo...
Chapter
This book explores the interface between African ethical values and current technological advancement. There is no doubt that Africans are among the major consumers of modern technologies. However, in doing so, they have adopted dominant value system that come with them without probing their implications on the African cultural values system. In th...
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The emergence of artificial intelligence, robotic innovations, technology and computers have created a world that has enabled people to have interactions and experiences that would otherwise be impossible. While the African continent is not a significant producer of many of these emerging technologies, it seems, however, to be an enthusiastic consu...
Book
This book charts technological developments from an African ethical perspective. It explores the idea that while certain technologies have benefited Africans, the fact that these technologies were designed and produced in and for a different setting leads to conflicts with African ethical values. Written in a simple and engaging style, the authors...
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Full-text available
Traditional Africans' belief in and veneration of ancestors is an almost ubiquitous, long-held and widely known, for it is deeply entrenched in the African metaphysical worldview itself. This belief in and veneration of ancestors is characterised by strong moral undertone. This moral undertone involves an implicit indication that individual members...
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The main argument of this paper is that current debates and discussions on environmental justice seem to focus more on the West. In a typical African communitarian society, the idea of environmental justice has not been adequately conceptualised. Key scholars in African environmental ethics such as Godfrey Tangwa, Segun Ogungbemi and Murove Munyara...
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Full-text available
The main argument of this paper is that current debates and discussions on environmental justice seem to focus more on the West. In a typical African communitarian society, the idea of environmental justice has not been adequately conceptualised. Key scholars in African environmental ethics such as Godfrey Tangwa, Segun Ogungbemi and Murove Munyara...
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Full-text available
The argument of this chapter is that the processes and practicality of the claim by most African scholars that there has to be integration of AIKS into the current scientific ecological conservation strategies has not been adequately interrogated from an applied ethics perspective. This is because even though AIKS had important values for conservin...
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The authors argue that AIKS is receiving attention by academia and development institutions particularly the need to document, protect and preserve these unique intellectual foundation that embodies the different corpora of practices, thoughts, skills, techniques and epistemologies. This is because researchers and other stakeholders including polic...
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The chapter argues that increased focus on healthy lifestyle and sustainable environment has resulted in the desire to return to organic farming, which is a product of indigenous farming methods. This method of farming originates from indigenous knowledge system, which uses local farming techniques. Even though indigenous farming has a number of po...
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The authors of this chapter view the possible hybridization of indigenous and exogenous communication systems as a form of ethical enculturation. In their view, the call to integrate Indigenous communication systems into current technological communication system to prevent it from eroding has not come without ethical challenges. Even though each f...
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Discussions on the African communitarian idea of personhood have generated several debates among African philosophers about how it is conceived and perceived. While scholars like Wiredu and Gyekye maintain that personhood is gender-neutral, others such as Oyowe suggest that personhood is gendered. The position that African communitarian personhood...
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The consequences of the mining industry in Karamoja region have resulted into a serious environmental hazard to all forms of life in the area. For some reasons, efforts by the Ugandan government to respond to the environmental crisis seem inadequate. Investors in the mining sector and other stakeholders particularly those who are directly affected...
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Full-text available
This article is a contribution to overpopulation discourse in environmental ethics. It is based on the hypothesis that, even though the idea and reasoning behind Garret Hardin’s lifeboat metaphor are crucial within the current environmental crisis, from an African perspective, the metaphor raises a number of questions. The article argues that the l...
Chapter
The global phenomenon of migration continues to confront most Christian communities and churches in postcolonial Africa. Because of globalization, twice as many people are migrating as were 25 years ago1 and many scholars describe this century as the “age of migration.”2

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