Beate Kraft

Beate Kraft
University of Southern Denmark | SDU · Department of Biology

PhD

About

14
Publications
5,113
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1,046
Citations
Introduction
Beate Kraft currently works at the Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark. Beate does research in Microbiology and Marine Biology.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
University of Southern Denmark
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
March 2016 - July 2019
University of Southern Denmark
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2014 - December 2015
Harvard University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Nitrosopumilus maritimus is a marine ammonia-oxidizing archaeon with a high affinity for ammonia. It fixes carbon via a modified hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle and shows weak utilization of cyanate as a supplementary energy and nitrogen source. When oxygen is depleted, N. maritimus produces its own oxygen, which may explain its regular occ...
Article
Full-text available
Consuming oxygen, but making it too For marine microbes, there are myriad biological reactions involved in the cycling of nutrients and the generation of energy. Availability of oxygen is crucial for many species’ metabolism. Kraft et al . were surprised to find that pure cultures of an ammonia-oxidizing archaean (AOA) (see the Perspective by Marte...
Article
Full-text available
Denitrifying Betaproteobacteria play a key role in the anaerobic degradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons. We performed a multi‐omics study to better understand the metabolism of the representative organism Georgfuchsia toluolica strain G5G6 known as a strict anaerobe coupling toluene oxidation with dissimilatory nitrate and Fe(III) reduction. Desp...
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Full-text available
The Bay of Bengal hosts persistent, measurable, but sub-micromolar, concentrations of oxygen in its oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ). Such low-oxygen conditions are not necessarily rare in the global ocean and seem also to characterize the OMZ of the Pescadero Basin in the Gulf of California, as well as the outer edges of otherwise anoxic OMZs, such as ca...
Article
Full-text available
Mangroves are ecosystems located in the transition zone between land and sea, characterized by periodic flooding that confer to its unique characteristics. Little is known about the transformation of nutrients that occur during the organic matter degradation in this system. In this study, we monitor the nitrogen transformations in soils from three...
Article
Full-text available
Succession of redox processes is sometimes assumed to define a basic microbial community structure for ecosystems with oxygen gradients. In this paradigm, aerobic respiration, denitrification, fermentation and sulfate reduction proceed in a thermodynamically determined order, known as the ‘redox tower’. Here, we investigated whether redox sorting o...
Article
Full-text available
In the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, microbial respiration processes compete for nitrate as an electron acceptor. Denitrification converts nitrate into nitrogenous gas and thus removes fixed nitrogen from the biosphere, whereas ammonification converts nitrate into ammonium, which is directly reusable by primary producers. We combined multiple para...
Article
Full-text available
In the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, microbial respiration processes compete for nitrate as an electron acceptor. Denitrification converts nitrate into nitrogenous gas and thus removes fixed nitrogen from the biosphere, whereas ammonification converts nitrate into ammonium, which is directly reusable by primary producers. We combined multiple para...
Article
Marine denitrification constitutes an important part of the global nitrogen cycle and the diversity, abundance and process rates of denitrifying microorganisms have been the focus of many studies. Still, there is little insight in the ecophysiology of marine denitrifying communities. In this study, a heterotrophic denitrifying community from sedime...
Article
Full-text available
Sandy coastal sediments are global hotspots for microbial mineralization of organic matter and denitrification. These sediments are characterized by advective porewater flow, tidal cycling and an active and complex microbial community. Metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities sampled from such sediments showed that potential sulfur oxidizing...
Article
The biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, including nitrate reduction processes, is highly affected by human activity such as fertilization and ammonia deposition caused by fossil fuel burning. Consequently, gaining a better understanding about the ecophysiology of nitrate-reducing microbial communities is crucial for inferring the impact of anthropogenic...
Article
Full-text available
So far, microbial physiology has dedicated itself mainly to pure cultures. In nature, cross feeding and competition are important aspects of microbial physiology and these can only be addressed by studying complete communities such as enrichment cultures. Metagenomic sequencing is a powerful tool to characterize such mixed cultures. In the analysis...
Article
Full-text available
Sediments of coastal upwelling areas are generally characterised by a high content of organic carbon that is mainly degraded via anaerobic microbial processes including sulfate reduction as a major terminal oxidation step. Despite the high importance of sulfate reduction in these sediments, the identity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has remain...

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