Bayden Dwight Russell

Bayden Dwight Russell
The University of Hong Kong | HKU · Swire Institute of Marine Science

Ph.D.

About

154
Publications
44,575
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Citations
Introduction
Dr. Bayden D. Russell is an Associate Director of the Swire Institute of Marine Science at the University of Hong Kong. His research seeks to understand the impact of climate change on ecosystem function, the biology of key species, and how best to manage and conserve ecosystems in this context. He also investigates the human relationship with, and dependence on, marine ecosystems and how these can be made sustainable through habitat restoration and development of multi-trophic aquaculture.
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - present
The University of Hong Kong
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
April 2014 - April 2015
Xiamen University
Position
  • Senior Visiting Research Fellow
January 2014 - July 2015
University of Adelaide
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (154)
Article
With rising ocean temperatures, extreme weather events such as marine heatwaves (MHWs) are increasing in frequency and duration, pushing marine life beyond their physiological limits. The potential to respond to extreme conditions through physiological acclimatization, and pass on resistance to the next generation, fundamentally depends on the capa...
Article
Full-text available
Climatic transition zones are characterized by large annual variation in environmental conditions which heavily influence seasonal abundance of organisms and their assemblage patterns. With climate change altering phenology and distribution of species globally, establishing baseline biological patterns allows us to understand trends and challenges...
Article
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Oyster reefs are structurally complex habitats which are increasingly recognized for their importance in estuarine systems. With over 85% of oyster reefs lost to human activities globally, there is increasing interest in aquaculture to not only meet the growing need for food worldwide, but also enhance ecological functions and services. Prime among...
Article
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The Hong Kong oyster Magallana hongkongensis, previously known as Crassostrea hongkongensis, is a true oyster species native to the estuarine-coast of the Pearl River Delta in southern China. The species—with scientific, ecological, cultural, and nutritional importance—has been farmed for hundreds of years. However, there is only limited informatio...
Preprint
Habitat destruction and biodiversity loss from exploitation of ecosystems have led to increased restoration and conservation efforts worldwide. Disturbed ecosystems accumulate a recovery debt - the accumulated loss of ecosystem services - and quantifying this debt presents a valuable tool to develop better ecosystem restoration practices. Here, we...
Article
Heatwaves are increasing in frequency and intensity, with substantial impacts on ecosystems and species which maintain their function. Whether or not species are harmed by heatwave conditions by being pushed beyond their physiological bounds can depend on whether energy replacement is sufficient to enable recovery from acute stress. We exposed an e...
Article
Marine heatwaves (MHWs), discrete but prolonged periods of anomalously warm seawater, can fundamentally restructure marine communities and ecosystems. Although our understanding of these events has improved in recent years, key knowledge gaps hinder our ability to predict how MHWs will affect patterns of biodiversity. Here, we outline a functional...
Article
The global recognition of the importance of science communication has led to a recent emphasis on outreach and broad dissemination of information as a core component of a scientist's role. Increasingly, training for academics is seen as a necessity for successful outreach activities, yet it has associated costs which may deter some from participati...
Preprint
Full-text available
Herbivores play an integral part in maintaining the health of coral reefs by suppressing the growth of algae and accumulation of sediment and facilitating coral growth. However, in predator-depleted systems where densities of herbivores are unnaturally high, grazing can have detrimental effects on corals through excessive bioerosion. Yet, these ben...
Article
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The ability of an organism to alter its physiology in response to environmental conditions offers a short-term defense mechanism in the face of weather extremes resulting from climate change. These often manifest as multiple, interacting drivers, especially pH and temperature. In particular, decreased pH can impose constraints on the biological mec...
Article
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Ocean warming is predicted to challenge the persistence of a variety of marine organisms, especially when combined with ocean acidification. Whilst temperature affects virtually all physiological processes, the extent to which thermal history mediates the adaptive capacity of marine organisms to climate change has been largely overlooked. Using pop...
Article
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The world’s temperate coastlines support a rich marine biodiversity and provide billions of dollars of ecosystem services to the global economy annually. Temperate coasts are, however, some of the most densely populated and impacted coastal regions of the world and are increasingly modified by a range of local and global impacts. Understanding the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Authentic, place-based experiential learning is essential for students of ecology, whilst an understanding of broader human impacts is necessary for effective conservation efforts. Creating future environmental leaders requires fostering such understanding whilst building transferable skills in collaboration, communication and cultural competence....
Conference Paper
Authentic, place-based experiential learning is essential for students of ecology, whilst an understanding of broader human impacts is necessary for effective conservation efforts. Creating future environmental leaders requires fostering such understanding whilst building transferable skills in collaboration, communication and cultural competence....
Article
Future ocean CO 2 and temperatures are predicted to increase primary productivity across tropical marine habitats, potentially driving a shift towards algal-dominated systems. However, increased consumption of algae by benthic grazers could potentially counter this shift. Yet, the response of different grazer species to future conditions will be mo...
Article
Seagrass meadows are habitat for an abundance and diversity of animal life, and their continuing global loss has focused effort on their restoration. This restoration not only aims to re‐establish the structure of the seagrass, but also to restore its function, particularly as habitat. The success of seagrass restoration is typically measured by th...
Article
Reef building oysters historically provided the main structural and ecological component of temperate and sub‐tropical coastal waters globally. While the loss of oyster reefs is documented in most regions globally, assessments of the status of Asian oyster reefs are limited. The feasibility of restoration within the regional biological and societal...
Article
Marine heatwaves (MHWs) are an emerging threat to marine organisms that have increased in frequency and magnitude in the past decade. These extreme heating events can have differential impacts on organisms with some experiencing mortality while others survive. Here, we experimentally exposed two species of subtidal gastropod (Trochus sacellum and A...
Article
Full-text available
The ocean provides resources key to human health and well-being, including food, oxygen, livelihoods, blue spaces, and medicines. The global threat to these resources posed by accelerating ocean acidification is becoming increasingly evident as the world’s oceans absorb carbon dioxide emissions. While ocean acidification was initially perceived as...
Article
Accelerating CO2 emissions have driven physico-chemical changes in the world's oceans, such as ocean acidification and warming. How marine organisms adjust or succumb to such environmental changes may be determined by their ability to balance energy intake against expenditure (i.e. energy budget) as energy supports physiological functions, includin...
Article
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The concept of ‘blue growth’, which aims to promote the growth of ocean economies whilst holistically managing marine socio-ecological systems, is emerging within national and international marine policy. The concept is often promoted as being novel, however, we show that, historical analogies exist which can provide insights for contemporary plann...
Article
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An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Under climate change, many species are increasingly exposed to heatwaves, including marine species. Although marine species are expected to succumb to heatwaves, there is increasing interest in understanding why some can persist. As heatwaves can greatly elevate intertidal seawater temperature, we explore reasons for variation in biological perform...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Understanding and quantifying the seasonal patterns in biodiversity of phytobenthos, macro‐zoobenthos and fishes in Mediterranean coastal lagoons, and the species dependence upon environmental factors. Location The study was carried out in the “Stagnone di Marsala e Saline di Trapani e Paceco,” the largest coastal lagoon system in the central...
Article
Full-text available
The term Blue Carbon (BC) was first coined a decade ago to describe the disproportionately large contribution of coastal vegetated ecosystems to global carbon sequestration. The role of BC in climate change mitigation and adaptation has now reached international prominence. To help prioritise future research, we assembled leading experts in the fie...
Chapter
Interactions in the Marine Benthos - edited by Stephen J. Hawkins August 2019
Article
Full-text available
Aim Understanding the relative importance of climatic and non‐climatic distribution drivers for co‐occurring, functionally similar species is required to assess potential consequences of climate change. This understanding is, however, lacking for most ecosystems. We address this knowledge gap and forecast changes in distribution for habitat‐forming...
Article
The CO2-boosted trophic transfer from primary producers to herbivores has been increasingly discovered at natural CO2 vents and in laboratory experiments. Despite the emerging knowledge of this boosting effect, we do not know the extent to which it may be enhanced or dampened by ocean warming. We investigated whether ocean acidification and warming...
Article
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Understanding physiological responses of organisms to warming and ocean acidification is the first step towards predicting the potential population-and community-level ecological impacts of these stressors. Increasingly, physiological plasticity is being recognized as important for organisms to adapt to the changing microclimates. Here, we evaluate...
Article
Ecologically dominant species often define ecosystem states, but as human disturbances intensify, their subordinate counterparts increasingly displace them. We consider the duality of disturbance by examining how environmental drivers can simultaneously act as a stressor to dominant species and as a resource to subordinates. Using a model ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme climatic events, such as heatwaves, are predicted to be more prevalent in future due to global climate change. The devastating impacts of heatwaves on the survival of marine organisms may be further intensified by ocean acidification. Here, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to heatwave temperatures (24 °C, +3 °C summer seawat...
Article
Many marine organisms produce calcareous shells as the key structure for defence, but the functionality of shells may be compromised by ocean acidification and warming. Nevertheless, calcifying organisms may adaptively modify their shell properties in response to these impacts. Here, we examined how reduced pH and elevated temperature affect shell...
Article
Artificial structures will be increasingly utilized to protect coastal infrastructure from sea-level rise and storms associated with climate change. Although it is well documented that the materials comprising artificial structures influence the composition of organisms that use them as habitat, little is known about how these materials may chemica...
Article
Accelerating climate change is eroding the functioning and stability of ecosystems by weakening the interactions among species that stabilize biological communities against change [ 1 ]. A key challenge to forecasting the future of ecosystems centers on how to extrapolate results from short-term, single-species studies to community-level responses...
Article
Full-text available
Connecting the nonlinear and often counterintuitive physiological effects of multiple environmental drivers to the emergent impacts on ecosystems is a fundamental challenge. Unfortunately, the disconnect between the way "stressors" (e.g., warming) is considered in organismal (physiological) and ecological (community) contexts continues to hamper pr...
Article
en Although the public desire for healthy environments is clear‐cut, the science and management of ecosystem health has not been as simple. Ecological systems can be dynamic and can shift abruptly from one ecosystem state to another. Such unpredictable shifts result when ecological thresholds are crossed; that is, small cumulative increases in an e...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding physiological responses of organisms to warming and ocean acidification is the first step towards predicting the potential population, community and ecological impacts of these stressors. Increasingly, physiological plasticity is being recognized as important for organisms to adapt to the changing microclimates. Here, we evaluate the...
Article
Calcifying organisms are considered particularly susceptible to the future impacts of ocean acidification (OA), but recent evidence suggests that they may be able to maintain calcification and overall fitness. The underlying mechanism remains unclear but may be attributed to mineralogical plasticity, which modifies the energetic cost of calcificati...
Article
Full-text available
Reduction in seawater pH due to rising levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) in the world's oceans is a major force set to shape the future of marine ecosystems and the ecological services they provide [1,2]. In particular, ocean acidification is predicted to have a detrimental effect on the physiology of calcifying organisms [3]. Yet, the i...
Article
The effects of ocean acidification (OA) on the structure and complexity of coastal marine biogenic habitat have been broadly overlooked. Here we explore how declining pH and carbonate saturation may aaect the structural complexity of four major biogenic habitats. Our analyses predict that indirect eeects driven by OA on habitat-forming organisms co...
Article
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When conditions are stressful, reproduction and population growth are reduced, but when favourable, reproduction and population size can boom. Theory suggests climate change is an increasingly stressful environment, predicting extinctions or decreased abundances. However, if favourable conditions align, such as an increase in resources or release f...
Article
Coral reefs are one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to ocean acidification. While our understanding of the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems is growing, gaps remain that limit our ability to translate scientific knowledge into management action. To guide solution-based research, we review the current knowledge of o...
Article
The coastlines of southern China and SE Asia represent some of the most anthropogenically impacted ecosystems in the world, yet they support a rich biodiversity and provide important ecosystem services, including being the source of the vast majority of the world's aquaculture production. The challenges faced by coastal ecosystems in this region ar...
Article
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Forecasting the ecological consequences of a changing climate requires a range of approaches, including the use of mesocosms in which multiple physical and chemical parameters can be manipulated and the response of interacting organisms quantified. Here, we describe the design and evaluate the performance of a facility incorporating large mesocosms...
Data
Warming of the world's oceans is predicted to have many negative effects on organisms as they have optimal thermal windows. In coastal waters, however, both temperatures and pCO2 (pH) exhibit diel variations, and biological performances are likely to be modulated by physical and chemical environmental changes. To understand how coastal zooplankton...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The ecological consequences of climate change will be driven by a combination of both gradual and abrupt changes in climatic conditions. Despite growing evidence that abrupt abiotic change of extreme events may profoundly alter ecological processes, it remains unclear how such events may combine with longer-term global and local disturb...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean warming is anticipated to strengthen the persistence of turf-forming habitat, yet the concomitant elevation of grazer metabolic rates may accelerate per capita rates of consumption to counter turf predominance. Whilst this possibility of strong top-down control is supported by the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE), it assumes that consumer me...
Article
Full-text available
Warming of the world’s oceans is predicted to have many negative effects on organisms as they have optimal thermal windows. In coastal waters, however, both temperatures and pCO2 (pH) exhibit diel variations, and biological performances are likely to be modulated by physical and chemical environmental changes. To understand how coastal zooplankton...
Article
The possible impacts of ocean acidification have gained substantial attention for their potential to alter physiological functioning of marine organisms. Less recognized are the present impacts of estuarine acidification, a widespread form of coastal acidification caused by terrestrial runoff and coastal current dynamics. We examined the effects of...
Article
Ocean ecosystems are predicted to lose biodiversity and productivity from increasing ocean acidification. Whilst laboratory experiments reveal negative effects of acidification on the behaviour and performance of species, more comprehensive predictions have been hampered by a lack of in situ studies that incorporate the complexity of interactions b...
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Full-text available
Current trends in habitat loss have been forecast to accelerate under anticipated global change, thereby focusing conservation attention on identifying the circumstances under which key species interactions retard habitat loss. Urbanised coastlines are associated with broad-scale loss of kelp canopies and their replacement by less productive mats o...
Article
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Red algae of the family Peyssonneliaceae typically form thin crusts impregnated with aragonite. Here we report the first discovery of brucite in a thick red algal crust (~1 cm) formed by the peyssonnelioid species Polystrata dura from Papua New Guinea. Cells of P. dura were found to be in-filled by the magnesium rich mineral brucite [Mg(OH)2]. Mino...
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Disturbance often results in small changes in community structure, but the probability of transitioning to contrasting states increases when multiple disturbances combine. Nevertheless, we have limited insights into the mechanisms that stabilise communities, particularly how perturbations can be absorbed without restructuring (i.e. resistance). Her...
Article
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The capacity of natural systems to resist environmental change underpins ecosystem stability, e.g. the persistence of kelp-dominated states which are sometimes displaced by subordinates or weedy species (i.e. algal turfs). Perturbation by resource enhancement at global (e.g. CO2 emissions) through local scales (e.g. nutrient pollution) increases th...