Bart Peeters

Bart Peeters
Norwegian University of Science and Technology | NTNU · Centre for Biodiversity Dynamics

PhD biology

About

18
Publications
5,719
Reads
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106
Citations
Introduction
My main interest is in wildlife ecology and genetics. I am particularly interested in how ecological processes vary in space and time through interactions with environmental and anthropogenic drivers, at the individual, population and community level. My research is mainly focused on herbivores in high Arctic ecosystems and implications for management and conservation.
Additional affiliations
March 2015 - February 2019
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Position
  • PhD

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Variation in adult sex ratio (ASR) affects population demography and dynamics of large mammals. The mechanisms behind this variation are largely unclear, but may be partly related to climatic drivers and density dependence operating differently on the adult male and female segments of the population. Here, we examine such drivers of annual changes...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic winters have become increasingly warmer and rainier. Where permafrost prevails, winter rain (or rain-on-snow; ROS) is known to occasionally cause extensive ice layers at the snow/ground interface, i.e. “basal ice” or “ground-ice”, with potentially large ecological and socio-economic implications. However, an overall lack of field data has so...
Article
Full-text available
The ‘Moran effect’ predicts that dynamics of populations of a species are synchronized over similar distances as their environmental drivers. Strong population synchrony reduces species viability, but spatial heterogeneity in density dependence, the environment, or its ecological responses may decouple dynamics in space, preventing extinctions. How...
Article
Full-text available
Sea ice loss may have dramatic consequences for population connectivity, extinction‐colonization dynamics, and even the persistence of Arctic species subject to climate change. This is of particular concern in face of additional anthropogenic stressors, such as overexploitation. In this study, we assess the population‐genetic implications of dimini...
Article
Full-text available
Harvesting can magnify the destabilising effects of environmental perturbations on population dynamics and, thereby, increase extinction risk. However, population‐dynamic theory predicts that impacts of harvesting depend on the type and strength of density‐dependent regulation. Here, we used logistic population growth models and an empirical reinde...
Preprint
Harvesting can magnify the destabilizing effects of environmental perturbations on population dynamics and, thereby, increase extinction risk. However, population-dynamic theory predicts that impacts of harvesting depend on the type and strength of density-dependent regulation. Here, we used logistic population growth models and an empirical reinde...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife managers adjust harvest quotas based on population changes and specific management goals, like controlling population size and demography or minimizing human-�wildlife interactions. However, establishing quotas that best meet these goals can be challenging due to e.g. population fluctuations, climate change, and bias or variation in harves...
Article
Achieving sustainable harvesting of natural populations depends on our ability to predict population responses to the combined effects of harvesting and environmental fluctuations while accounting for other internal and external factors that influence population dynamics in time and space. Here, we review recent research showing how spatial pattern...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Artar som lever i eit miljø med store sesongvariasjonar i både miljøforhold og ressurstilgang, er avhengige av reproduksjonsstrategiar som på ein best mulig måte sikrar god overleving og vekst for avkoma. «Timing» av reproduksjon og strategiar for korleis ulike organismar investerer i produksjon av avkom, er to av dei mest sentrale livshistorietrek...
Poster
Full-text available
Warm spells and rain (often termed rain-on-snow, ROS) events in winter are becoming increasingly frequent across the Arctic as a consequence of global warming. This causes changes in snowpack properties and, possibly, more frequent and more extensive ground icing, which may strongly affect vegetation, soil invertebrates and populations of herbivore...
Poster
Full-text available
A detailed understanding of population connectivity and the effects of anthropogenic stressors on genetic diversity and structure are important for the conservation and management of wild populations. The wild Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus) is an island sub-species with particularly low genetic variation. Nevertheless, studies...
Presentation
In ungulates, variation in adult sex ratio is known to affect population demography and dynamics, yet the natural mechanisms behind this variation remain unclear. We examined how sex-specific effects of climate and population density influence annual changes in adult sex ratios in Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus, Vrolik 1829), a...
Article
Full-text available
Saxifraga oppositifolia L. is a common circumpolar plant species that displays considerable morphological and genetic variation throughout its range. It is mainly diploid, but tetraploids are reported from several regions. The growth form varies from prostate to cushion-shaped, and the plant thrives in wet snow beds as well as on dry ridges. This v...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Hi. I am revising a paper on landscape genetics between island populations of reindeer. One of the reviewers suggested to perform landscape genetic analyses (IBD, IBR) at the individual level rather than population level, and pointed out that "FST contains mostly historic information, while some individual-based genetic distances might better reflect recent impacts on gene flow."
This could be interesting, but I have a hard time to find a relevant study that would support this claim. Does any of you know of any articles about this?

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The goal of this project is to to understand the interactive effects of harvest, habitat fragmentation and climate change on the distribution, abundance and population genetics of a large island ungulate, the wild Svalbard reindeer. The project is financed by the Svalbard Environmental Protection Fund.
Project
This project, financed by the Svalbard Environmental Protection Fund, aims to explore how rain-on-snow (ROS) events impact snow-ice conditions, vegetation characteristics and soil/permafrost properties in the high Arctic.
Project
INSYNC aims to explore how patterns of community dynamics in time and space are driven by direct versus indirect effects of climate (change). To achieve this, we will combine stochastic demographic modelling, experimental approaches and analyses of timeseries from the Svalbard tundra ecosystem. The project is financed by the Research Council Norway (2018-2021). Project webpage: https://www.ntnu.edu/web/cbd/insync