Barry Sinervo
In memory of

Barry Sinervo
University of California, Santa Cruz | UCSC · Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

Phd

About

288
Publications
72,105
Reads
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16,904
Citations
Citations since 2016
119 Research Items
6537 Citations
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Introduction
Barry Sinervo currently works at the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz. Barry does research in Evolutionary Biology spanning game theory, population genetic theory, behavior and physiology, all now under the impacts of climate change to help inform the public and save the planet from the worst social and biological catastrophe that humanity has ever faced. See all his works in journals -- being upload now in this portal.
Additional affiliations
July 2015 - present
University of California
Position
  • Climate Change
Description
  • We research biotic impacts of climate, and deliver workshops (e.g., http://bio.research.ucsc.edu/~barrylab/classes/climate_change/ClimateChange.htm) Puerto Madryn, AR, 9/2013 email: morando@cenpat.edu.ar Bariloche, AR, 12/2013 email: noraibarg@gmail.com
June 2001 - August 2001
September 1989 - present
University of California, Santa Cruz
Position
  • Game Theory
Description
  • See my game theory lectures with Dan Friedman or workshops that I give (e.g., Sao Paulo, Brazil) http://bio.research.ucsc.edu/~barrylab/classes/game_theory/GameTheory.html
Education
November 1960 - July 1988
the world
Field of study
  • simple country lizard doctor

Publications

Publications (288)
Article
Full-text available
Male competition conforms to a cost-benefit model, because while aggression may increase reproductive prospects, it can also increase risk of injury. We hypothesize that an additional cost in aggressive males would be an increase of parasite load associated with a high energy investment into sexual competition. Some of these infections, in turn, ma...
Article
1. Thermal constraints imposed by the environment limit the activity time of ectotherms and have been a central issue in ecophysiology. Assessing these restrictions is key to determining the vulnerability of species to changing thermal niches and developing conservation strategies. 2. We generate an explicit tortoise model of thermal constraints at...
Article
Global change imposes multiple challenges on species and, thus, a reliable prediction of current and future vulnerability of species must consider multiple stressors and intrinsic traits of species. Climate, physiology, and forest cover, for example, are required to evaluate threat to thermolabile forest-dependent species, such as sloths (Bradypus...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is one of the most pressing challenges for ectotherms due to their dependence on environmental temperature. Extirpation of populations of lizards have already been reported, including endemic species occurring in the mountains of Central México. Here, we characterize the thermal ecology of a montane, viviparous lizard species, Barisi...
Article
Tortoises of the genus Gopherus evolved in North America and have survived major environmental challenges in the past 40 million years. However, this genus now faces multiple anthropogenic threats, such as the introduction of invasive plant species. Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris) is considered one of the greatest threats to arid and tropical ecosy...
Article
Ecophysiological models are more data demanding and, consequently, less used than correlative ecological niche models to predict species’ distribution under climate change, especially for endotherms. Hybrid models that integrate both approaches are even less used, and several aspects about their predictions (e.g. accuracy, geographic extent and unc...
Article
Full-text available
Given the rapid loss of biodiversity as consequence of climate change, greater knowledge of ecophysiological and natural history traits are crucial to determine which environmental factors induce stress and drive the decline of threatened species. Liolaemus montanezi (Liolaemidae), a xeric-adapted lizard occurring only in a small geographic range i...
Article
Elevated temperatures during development affect a wide range of traits in ectotherms. Less well understood is the impact of global warming on brain development, which has only rarely been studied experimentally. Here, we evaluate current progress in the field and search for common response patterns among ectotherm groups. Evidence suggests that tem...
Article
Full-text available
Experimentally assessing the preferred body temperature (T pref) of ectothermic animals is important to understand thermal adaptation. In lizards, this variable is usually estimated by measuring body temperature in thermal gradients. To quantify the extent to which different experimental setups influence the inferred T pref values we submitted 65 i...
Article
Full-text available
The diversity of habitats generated by the Andes uplift resulted a mosaic of heterogeneous environments in South America for species to evolve a variety of ecological and physiological specializations. Species in the lizard family Liolaemidae occupy a myriad of habitats in the Andes. Here we analyze the tempo and mode of evolution in the thermal bi...
Article
Full-text available
The ring species Ensatina represents a classic example of locally adapted lineages. The Monterey ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii eschscholtzii) is a cryptic subspecies with brown coloration, although a recently discovered polymorphic population within a wind-blown sand region also contains leucistic (pink) and xanthistic (orange) morphs. In the pr...
Article
The ring species Ensatina represents a classic example of locally adapted lineages. The Monterey ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii eschscholtzii) is a cryptic subspecies with brown coloration, although a recently discovered polymorphic population within a wind-blown sand region also contains leucistic (pink) and xanthistic (orange) morphs. In the pr...
Article
Global climate change and the associated erosion of habitat suitability are pervasive threats to biodiversity. It is critical to identify specific stressors to assess a species vulnerability to extinction, especially in species with distinctive natural histories. Here, we present a combination of field, laboratory, and modeling approaches to evalua...
Chapter
The extent of stress caused by acute and chronic environmental disturbances depends on the adaptive ability of organisms to behaviorally and physiologically adjust to change and on the timing and magnitude of the disturbances. This resilience is a result of numerous exposures to perturbations throughout the evolution of the species. In Patagonia, v...
Article
Ectotherm thermal physiology is frequently used to predict species responses to changing climates, but for amphibians, water loss may be of equal or greater importance. Using physical models, we estimated the frequency of exceeding the thermal optimum (T opt) or critical evaporative water loss (EWLcrit) limits, with and without shade‐ or water‐seek...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental temperatures influence ectotherms’ physiology and capacity to perform activities necessary for survival and reproduction. Time available to perform those activities is determined by thermal tolerances and environmental temperatures. Estimates of activity time might enhance our ability to predict suitable areas for species’ persistence...
Article
Mating system theory based on economics of resource defense has been applied to describe social system diversity across taxa. Such models are generally successful but fail to account for stable mating systems across different environments or shifts in mating system without a change in ecological conditions. We propose an alternative approach to res...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change threatens global biodiversity by increasing extinction risk, yet few studies have uncovered a physiological basis of climate-driven species declines. Maintaining a stable body temperature is a fundamental requirement for homeothermic animals, and water is a vital resource that facilitates thermoregulation through evaporative cooling,...
Article
Full-text available
Climatic conditions changing over time and space shape the evolution of organisms at multiple levels, including temperate lizards in the family Lacertidae. Here we reconstruct a dated phylogenetic tree of 262 lacertid species based on a supermatrix relying on novel phylogenomic datasets and fossil calibrations. Diversification of lacertids was acco...
Article
Full-text available
In this contribution, the aspects of reptile and amphibian speciation that emerged from research performed over the past decade are reviewed. First, this study assesses how patterns and processes of speciation depend on knowing the taxonomy of the group in question, and discuss how integrative taxonomy has contributed to speciation research in thes...
Article
Full-text available
It is generally accepted that parasites exert negative effects on their hosts and that natural selection favors specific host responses that mitigate this impact. It is also known that some components of the host immune system often co-evolve with parasite antigens resulting in a host-parasite arms race. In addition to immunological components of t...
Article
Full-text available
In Rohr et al. (2018), we synthesize four published datasets on thermal acclimation and breadth to develop a framework for predicting thermal plasticity across taxa, latitudes, body sizes, traits, habitats, and methodological factors. Einum et al. (2019) recommend an alternative acclimation metric to one we used in this paper, though we argue that...
Article
Full-text available
Changing forest cover is a key driver of local climate change worldwide, as it affects both albedo and evapotranspiration (ET). Deforestation and forestation are predicted to have opposing influences on surface albedo and ET rates, and thus impact local surface temperatures differently. Relationships between forest change, albedo, ET, and local tem...
Data
Results for 2000–2010 climatic data. a Effects of decadal (2010–2000) forest change on decadal changes in annual land surface temperature (LST), evapotranspiration (ET) and albedo. b Comparative effects of deforestation (red) and forestation (blue) on LST changes across regions, considering only cells with ~50% of forest change. c Path diagrams sho...
Data
Effects of forest change on daytime (a) and nighttime (b) temperature. Each cell in the plots represents decadal (2011–2001) changes in annual means of climatic variables calculated for 0.05 x 0.05° cells grouped into bins of 5° latitude and 10% forest change. Positive (negative) values indicate a warming (cooling) effect of forest change. (DOCX)
Data
Summary of tests evaluating the effects of forest change on local climate. Models were fit separately for each climatic variable (a—e), for each region (tropical, temperate or boreal*), and for each category of forest change (deforestation or forestation**). All models included the type of cell (reference or focal) as a fixed effect, and the search...
Data
Results for searching windows of 9 x 5 cells (longitude x latitude). a Effects of decadal (2010–2000) forest change on decadal (2011–2001) changes in annual land surface temperature (LST), evapotranspiration (ET) and albedo. b Comparative effects of deforestation (red) and forestation (blue) on LST changes across regions, considering only cells wit...
Data
Standardized coefficient estimates for multi-level structural equation models. Coefficients are presented for each link of the path model (“Response”—“Predictor” pair). Models were fit separately for tropical, temperate and boreal regions. Three alternative spatial correlation structures were tested: rational quadratic (corRatio), exponential (corE...
Data
Effects of forest change on albedo change considering the albedo GLASS (Global LAnd Surface Satellites) dataset. Each cell in the plots represents decadal (2011–2001) changes in annual means of albedo calculated for 0.05 x 0.05° cells grouped into bins of 5° latitude and 10% forest change. For this analysis, we first calculated monthly averages, an...
Data
Histograms of standardized change values used in the analyses. Four variables are shown: forest cover (first column), annual land surface temperature (LST, second column), evapotranspiration (ET, third column) and albedo (fourth column). Values for each variable were recorded for each pair of focal/reference cells, as the one-decade change observed...
Data
Results for a different classification of focal and reference cells. For this analysis, we classified “focal” cell as cells with absolute forest cover change > 10%, and “reference” cells as cells with absolute forest cover change < 2% a Effects of decadal (2010–2000) forest change on decadal (2011–2001) changes in annual land surface temperature (L...
Data
Spatial distribution of all valid pairs of focal/reference cells used in the analyses. Each pair is represented as a single red point. A) Pairs used in the analyses of annual land surface temperature (LST; N = 36,493). B) Pairs used in the analyses of evapotranspiration (ET; N = 97,618). C) Pairs used in the analyses of albedo (N = 14,869). D) Pair...
Data
Histograms of daytime (left) and nighttime (right) land surface temperature (LST) change values. Values were recorded for each pair of focal/reference cells, as the one-decade (2010–2000) change observed in the focal cell minus the one-decade change in the reference cell. Values are shown separately for each region (Tropical, Temperate and Boreal)...
Data
Histograms of standardized forest change values for deforestation (A) and forestation (B). These values were used in the analyses comparing effects of deforestation and forestation on annual land surface temperature change (see Fig 4 in the main text). (DOCX)
Article
Covariation among behavioral and physiological traits is thought to enhance reproductive success and Darwinian fitness. Species that exhibit alternative mating strategies provide excellent opportunities to assess the relative contributions of physiological and behavioral traits to fitness. Male side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) exhibit three...
Article
Positive differential allocation predicts that females will increase their parental investment when mated to high-quality males due to the benefits that these males provide to offspring. Differential allocation predicts trade-offs between current and future reproduction, but investment trade-offs can also occur within a breeding event for species t...
Article
Full-text available
A recent global trend toward retirement of farmland presents opportunities to reclaim habitat for threatened and endangered species. We examine habitat restoration opportunities in one of the world's most converted landscapes, California's San Joaquin Desert (SJD). Despite the presence of 35 threatened and endangered species, agricultural expansion...
Data
Summary of resurvey effort for two apparently extirpated historical record locations at or near the historical northern range margin of Gambelia sila. (XLSX)
Data
Comparison of realized climatic niches for Gambelia sila and all three species in the genus Gambelia. Other members of the genus occupy hotter and drier environments than are available to G. sila in the San Joaquin Desert (see also S2 Fig). Occurrence data were thinned to one record per 30-arcsecond climate grid cell. Climate data were extracted fr...
Data
Ensemble habitat suitability surfaces generated for this study. Zipped file includes GeoTIFF files representing continuous and binary historical habitat suitability for Gambelia sila (see text). (ZIP)
Data
Discussion of potential impact of climate change. (PDF)
Data
Hours of restriction during the breeding season (left) and hours of activity during the active season (right). Hours of restriction are average number of hours per day during the breeding season (AMJJ) that operative environmental temperatures are too hot for Gambelia sila to be active above ground. Hours of activity are number of hours per day dur...
Data
Modeled change in habitat suitability over time for four future climate scenarios. Climate scenarios were selected to represent a range of potential future conditions, combining two global circulation models with two emission scenarios. The global circulation models predict either a relatively hot and dry future (MIROC-ESM) or a relatively warm and...
Data
Change in climatic niche of Gambelia sila from the historical era to modern era with respect to actual evapotranspiration (AET). The distribution of all distinct G. sila record locations on intact habitat has shifted toward sites with lower AET from the historical (pre-1960) to modern (1995 or after) periods. (TIFF)
Data
Threatened, endangered, extinct, and extirpated species of the San Joaquin Desert. List includes 42 species with occurrence records that fall within the boundary of the San Joaquin Desert (sensu Germano et al., 2011). SSC indicates a California species of special concern. (XLSX)
Data
Locations of some recent Gambelia sila habitat destruction. This list is by no means comprehensive. It is a partial list of locations where the authors and collaborators have observed habitat loss in the course of other work duties. Examining historical aerial imagery in the vicinity of many of these disturbances reveals additional instances of hab...
Data
Density plots for 11 candidate predictor variables. Shown are Gambelia sila occurrence locations and background sampling locations used for parameterizing our models. Occurrence data was thinned to one record per 1-km grid cell. Old locations on developed habitat were not included. (TIFF)
Data
Habitat suitability in the Westlands Water District peaks on alkaline soils located in the western portions of the district. Under a settlement negotiated with the federal government at least 405 km2 of farmland in Westlands Water District will be permanently retired, including 70–210 km2 of formerly suitable habitat for Gambelia sila. The thick bo...
Data
Biases and critiques of previous species distribution models for San Joaquin Desert species. (XLSX)
Data
Information on 11 candidate predictor variables evaluated for their strength in determining habitat quality and distribution. (XLSX)
Data
Locations of Gambelia sila occurrence observed on retired agricultural lands. Scars from former ploughing are clearly visible on aerial imagery of these sites. (XLSX)
Preprint
Full-text available
A recent global trend toward retirement of farmland presents opportunities to reclaim habitat for threatened and endangered species. We examine habitat restoration opportunities in one of the world’s most converted landscapes, California’s San Joaquin Desert (SJD). Despite the presence of 35 threatened and endangered species, agricultural expansion...
Preprint
Full-text available
A recent global trend toward retirement of farmland presents opportunities to reclaim habitat for threatened and endangered species. We examine habitat restoration opportunities in one of the world’s most converted landscapes, California’s San Joaquin Desert (SJD). Despite the presence of 35 threatened and endangered species, agricultural expansion...
Article
Full-text available
The lizard genus Phymaturus comprises two reciprocally monophyletic clades: Phymaturus palluma and Phymaturus patagonicus. Species belonging to the P. patagonicus clade occur in extra-Andean Patagonia, and some of them remain with unresolved phylogenetic relationships after studies based on morphological and nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) ev...
Article
Sexual selection can lead to rapid evolution of sexual traits and striking morphological diversity across taxa. In populations where competition for mates is intense, males sometimes evolve distinct behavioral strategies along with morphological differences that help them secure mating opportunities. Strong postcopulatory selection and differential...
Preprint
Full-text available
Speciation processes have long been inferred from phylogenetic, phylogeographic, and biogeographic pattern-driven perspectives. Now much current speciation research is attempting to more directly describe the underlying processes and mechanisms of divergence leading to speciation. Ideally, researchers should integrate both process-and pattern-based...
Preprint
Full-text available
Speciation processes have long been inferred from phylogenetic, phylogeographic, and biogeographic pattern-driven perspectives. Now much current speciation research is attempting to more directly describe the underlying processes and mechanisms of divergence leading to speciation. Ideally, researchers should integrate both process- and pattern-base...
Article
Phenotypic plasticity has been hypothesized to precede and facilitate adaptation to novel environments [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], but examples of plasticity preceding adaptation in wild populations are rare (but see [9, 10]). We studied a population of side-blotched lizards, Uta stansburiana, living on a lava flow that formed 22,500 years ago [11] t...
Article
Full-text available
For ectothermic species with broad geographical distributions, latitudinal/altitudinal variation in environmental temperatures (averages and extremes) are expected to shape the evolution of physiological tolerances and the acclimation capacity (i.e., degree of phenotypic plasticity) of natural populations. This can create geographical gradients of...
Article
The lizard genus Phymaturus comprises two reciprocally monophyletic clades: Phymaturus palluma and Phymaturus patagonicus. Species belonging to the P. patagonicus clade occur in extra-Andean Patagonia, and some of them remain with unresolved phylogenetic relationships after studies based on morphological and nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) ev...
Article
Full-text available
Thermal acclimation capacity, the degree to which organisms can alter their optimal performance temperature and critical thermal limits with changing temperatures, reflects their ability to respond to temperature variability and thus might be important for coping with global climate change. Here, we combine simulation modelling with analysis of pub...
Article
In many monogamous species, females behave aggressively toward other females, as they may threaten their exclusive access to paternal resources. However, in species with a high degree of breeding asynchrony not all females are true reproductive rivals. Female ornamentation that advertises sexual receptivity is a possible mechanism whereby parental...
Article
Full-text available
1.Climate change should lead to massive loss of biodiversity in most taxa but the detailed physiological mechanisms underlying population extinction remain largely elusive so far. In vertebrates, baseline levels of hormones such as glucocorticoids (GCs) may be indicators of population state since their secretion to chronic stress can impair surviva...