Barry Prentice

Barry Prentice
University of Manitoba | UMN · Asper School of Business Department of Supply Chain Management

Doctor of Philosophy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba

About

79
Publications
25,901
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205
Citations
Introduction
Barry Prentice is a Professor in the Department of Supply Chain Management, University of Manitoba. Barry does research in Business Economics, Supply chain management and Transport Economics. Dr. Prentice was instrumental in founding a major in transportation and logistics within the B.Comm. (Hons.) program at the I. H. Asper School of Business (fall 2003). In 1999 and 2003, he received University of Manitoba Outreach Awards. In 2009, Dr. Prentice was made an Honourary Life Member of the Canadian Transportation Research Forum. Since 2015, he is a Fellow in Transportation at Northern Policy Institute. In 2005, Dr. Prentice co-founded ISO Polar, as a not-for-profit association to promote the use of airships as sustainable transport for the northern latitudes.
Additional affiliations
January 1995 - December 2005
University of Manitoba
Position
  • Manager
Education
September 1982 - February 1986
University of Manitoba
Field of study
  • Agricultural Economics

Publications

Publications (79)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Healthcare systems across the globe are plagued by spiraling costs, quality concerns, inordinately long waiting times, increasing customer/patient dissatisfaction, and critical shortages of doctors, nurses, staff, space, and other resources (Umble and Umble, 2006). The healthcare systems of industrialized countries are under pressure t...
Article
Full-text available
As climate change progresses, the Arctic Ocean creates opportunities for new resource development and navigation routes. Such economic opportunities are attractive, but carry with them an increased risk of accidents and oil spills. Existing methods of emergency response face enormous challenges in the Arctic because of its lack of transportation in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The taxi industry is tightly regulated in Canada and until recently Transportation Network Companies (e.g. UBER) were prohibited from entering the market. Their attempt to enter the market in some provinces in Canada and in other parts of the world continues to be prohibited, notwithstanding public demand for cheaper and more available forms of tax...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The evolution of the motorized taxi industry in Vancouver is examined with respect to regulatory changes affecting competition. In the first half of the 20th century, a laissez-faire policy governed the industry, with some minor regulations designed to limit conduct. After 1946, strict intervention emerged that controlled entry, pricing or service...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Transportation by ocean carriers doubled every decade since 1970 but has recently faltered during the “Great Recession”. The purpose of this article is to examine whether containerization is going to renew its rapid growth or enter a period of slower growth and maturity. A model of technology growth is presented and the significant changes that hav...
Book
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Transport Nodal System provides a comprehensive introduction to the development of transport nodes and nodal systems, focusing on economic, operational, management, planning, policy, regulation and sustainability perspectives. Through a deep analysis on different types of transport nodes from diverse perspectives, this book shows the major issues a...
Chapter
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This chapter examines the opening up of the Arctic seas for maritime transport. It reviews the potential value of Arctic maritime transport by reviewing the economic literature on the opening of the Arctic. Also, it identifies some major research gaps that should be addressed in future research.
Conference Paper
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Jet turbine engines created a sea change in air travel. Jet engines were lighter, more powerful and required less maintenance than reciprocating engines. The jet aircraft could fly twice as fast as propeller aircraft, and soar well above the weather which made travel more comfortable, too. At the beginning of the civilian jet airliner age (circa 19...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The taxicab industry from time to time has come under attack. At times, attention has focussed on the service or the control of supply or tariffs or the regulatory system. The industry in two cities (Toronto and Ottawa) is examined, providing a brief background, history and licensing of the taxicab industry together with their regulatory experiment...
Conference Paper
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This paper traces the development of Western Canadian grain transportation policy, from a period of almost complete government intervention, command and control to an almost, but not quite deregulated supply chain. The first section examines the origins of the regulatory system and the circumstances faced by from the first Trudeau government. Subse...
Conference Paper
The airplane carriage of international trade is based on complex supply chains and keen competition between hub-and-spoke transport operations. Air transport has developed steadily over the past 70 years into a mature industry. It could now be subject to disruption as technological advances that are leading to the development of transport airships....
Article
Full-text available
Many challenges surround the engineeringdesign process of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Thispaper describes a composite of a capstone and tworesearch projects for the design of a navigation subsystemfor a UAV. These projects address control, stabilizationand autonomy of the vehicle with time-varying, nonlineardynamics in a challenging environme...
Article
The deeply integrated North American economy depends on efficient freight transport systems. This essay examines cabotage in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico from an economic and policy perspective. Cabotage is restricted by a web of regulations in North America that remain pervasive and continue to impose significant restraints on freight transportatio...
Article
Economic theory would define airport security as a public good; no different than border control or the military, but this is not how it is treated in many countries. In Mexico, airport security is financed entirely from the public treasury. In the U.S., the cost is split evenly between air passengers and the public treasury. In Canada, air passeng...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Many regions in northern Canada lack access to all-season road infrastructure. As a result, the transportation systems serving these regions are high-cost, unreliable, and service levels vary seasonally. The lack of low-cost, reliable freight transport service year-round imposes myriad negative impacts on these region’s residents. Improving freight...
Conference Paper
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Synopsis This paper examines the impact of grain transportation demand instability on customer service given Canada's implicit policy of railcar rationing. The Maximum Grain Revenue Entitlement and the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act perpetuate inefficiency in the grain supply chain and propagate shipper complaints while doing nothing to buffer the...
Article
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The containerized shipment of freight continues to grow rapidly. This development can be traced to a transformation of bulk and break-bulk service to containerization. Demand has been driven by opportunities to broaden logistical options as well as advantageous freight rates. Logisticians and policy makers are unsure how much more bulk traffic can...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Every year the world witnesses climate-related and geophysical disasters that claim many lives and cause immense human suffering. A consistent feature of such catastrophic disasters is the serious difficulty and delay in delivering relief equipment and supplies in a timely fashion. Often roads and railway lines are knocked out of commission, and ha...
Article
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The advance of transportation technology depends on science and economics. During the 1930s, airships and airplanes competed head-to-head for the Atlantic passenger market. When World War 2 broke out, everything changed. Over the next five years, the combined combatants built over half of a million military airplanes. By the end of the war, four-en...
Chapter
Full-text available
We speculate on the prospects for Global Logistics over the next 10–15 years. Three international transformations are emphasized: (1) Global trade will be enhanced, but often shifted to new regions (Asia, Africa). (2) Climate change will negatively affect ports and landside infrastructure, while possibly allowing faster transportation between Europ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Resource companies experience severe logistical challenges operating in Northern Canada. Developments in remote areas face high transportation costs, difficulty moving physically large cargo, and the extreme seasonality of ice roads and barge transportation. The cost of all-weather road construction and the lead-time for environmental approval can...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Approximately 25 airships are inflated and flying at any one time, somewhere in the world. So few airships exist that the regulations for manufacturing and operating large airships remain either non-prescribed, or are improvised as an extension of regulations designed for airplanes, helicopters or hot air balloons. As a new era of transport airshi...
Article
Full-text available
Despite vast improvements in transportation technology, cross costly and less efficient than it should be. greatly liberalized over the past decades, trade in tra cabotage policies, which are pervasive and extensive non the cost of North America's transportation systems. The term cabotage is used to refer both to the tra country and to the requirem...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Northern Canada has substantial forest resources of economic interest. Transportation is one of the largest direct costs of forestry operation. Infrastructure has to be constructed and back-haul opportunities are limited. All-season logging roads and ice road networks have few scale economies. Moreover, the operations of extracting logs are require...
Article
Full-text available
Qualitative research methods are used to examine the status of the "cold chain," which serves the Mexican market for Canadian food products. A brief synopsis of Canadian food exports to Mexico is presented to establish the demand for refrigerated transport. Subsequently, the supply of refrigerated transport is considered in terms of modal choice an...
Article
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In virtually all cases, U.S. law currently precludes cabotage. However, free trade of transportation services would facilitate greater economic efficiency in the trade of goods and services. This paper proposes a limited experiment in motor carrier cabotage in North America called "Open Prairies." Open Prairies would allow cabotage for U.S. and Can...
Article
Full-text available
Until the outbreak of the Second World War, uncertainty existed whether airships and airplanes would dominate intercontinental passenger transportation. The massive investments in fixed-wing aircraft during these hostilities made airplanes the decisive winner, and relegated airships to a negligible role in transportation. As the 21st Century progre...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Northern Canada has substantial natural resources of economic interest. The extraction of minerals, forest products and energy requires a minimum impact on the ecology and living conditions concerning, i.e. vegetation, wildlife and aboriginal people. In the case of forestry, it is very expensive to build access roads and they must be open to all tr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Despite the overwhelming success of transportation deregulation in Canada and various parts of the world the mode of transport that has been one of the most controversial and difficult to reform is the regulation of taxis. The literature on taxi regulation from markets from around the world illustrates polar extremes. Comparing the Winnipeg taxi ma...
Conference Paper
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The desire to increase trade and reduce environmental impact can create a conflict of goals. Several narratives are involved in the policy discussion of economic and technological mitigation strategies. The breadth of this topic ranges from the consideration of the environment within the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to industry-led g...
Article
This paper examines the development of various theories within the economics of regulation. The context of this examination is in the form of government provision of two types of customer service to a regulated industry; namely, stability and efficiency. Since efficiency gains, relative to stability gains, are achieved and exhausted more rapidly th...
Article
Cash sales are often made at a discount. This is as true for farmland as it is for commodities purchased in everyday commerce. A recent investigation of agricultural land prices in the central part of Wellington County, Ontario, since the mid-1920s confirms the lower price that all-cash can secure, but it finds that price does not increase progress...
Article
The equivalent of 100,000 truckloads of fresh fruits and vegetables are delivered to Canada each year. The arrival of these refrigerated trucks presents an opportunity for Canada to increase and diversify its exports of value-added food products to the United States. Economics dictates that these trucks must locate a load for their southbound retur...
Article
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The explosive growth of the Asian economies and in particular, those of India and China, are transforming the global economy, world energy demands and world trade flows, transportation networks and infrastructure of ships, ports, railways, roads, planes, airports and all of their related multi-modal handling facilities. Central to the transformatio...
Article
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NOTE This paper has been prepared by the authors to guide discussions at three Roundtables on Canada's Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridors Initiative in the spring of 2007 in Regina, Winnipeg and Calgary. The paper has been prepared with financial assistance from Transport Canada under the Government of Canada's Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Ini...
Article
Full-text available
The near-total exclusion of transportation from the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) almost surely has negative effects regarding overall efficiency and production in this trading bloc. The EU, which allows cabotage for trucking, could serve to as an example to judge the merits of freer international trade of trucking services, but it is,...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in transportation technology may mean that topography matters less, but trade routes will continue to favour the paths of least resistance. The location of gateway cities and distribution hubs exhibit patterns of hierarchical systems. A change in technology that alters location advantage heightens corridor competition and in the longer ter...
Article
Gravity models have a long history in the empirical analysis of trade flows and market penetration, but lack a strong economic foundation. This paper demonstrates that the gravity model can be reconciled with existing economic theory within the framework of an interregional trade model. An empirical gravity model of interregional trade is specified...
Article
Full-text available
The flight of the world's first heavier-than-air powered vehicle took just 12 seconds in 1903i and heralded the birth of a new transport mode. In the days, months, and years that followed Kitty Hawk, it must have been evident that airplanes had a future, but not to what shape or extent. For the first 50 years, airships and airplanes were head to he...
Article
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This study examines the validity of using proxy variables in gravity model analyses. Models describing eight different trade scenarios are developed. Four different models are estimated for the land transport of refrigerated pork from the five major exporting provinces in Canada to the 48 contiguous states of the continental United States. Four equ...
Conference Paper
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No transportation system is ever free of bottlenecks. Wherever the flow of traffic is constrained, a bottleneck could be said to exist. Intermodal systems are subject to more potential bottlenecks because of transshipment points require coordination. Investment in the individual parts is unlikely to consider the whole system. Removing one bottlenec...
Article
Economic Impact Studies have been used more for advocacy than analysis. The static framework of impact studies also contains an implicit assumption that the level of economic activity will be continued in perpetuity. This article shows that use of a consistent methodology for measuring economic impacts can yield reliable data concerning trends in c...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Economic Impact Studies are widely undertaken, but seldom explained with precision. When explanations are offered, they are often incomplete and appear ad hoc. Often they are ad hoc. The geographic scope is inappropriate, the activity coverage is excessive and the measurement techniques are unsound. This paper attempts to clarify some of the method...
Article
Full-text available
Cross-border transportation services for grain and live stock operate in separate markets. Live animals and livestock products are carried almost excl usively by truck transport in specialized trailers that do not generally carry grain. Refrigerated meat products form the largest value and mos t geographically dispersed volume of NAFTA livestock pr...
Article
An econometric analysis was undertaken in an attempt to estimate the relationships between sets of readily available indicators of airport activity and the economic impacts of Canadian airports. The results is an econometric model that can be used to update economic impacts, and that provides elasticities of airport employment and revenue. These el...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Many factors contribute to the determination of U.S. markets for western Canadian red meat. A gravity model, employing Ordinary Least Squares regression is used to analyse potential markets. The southeastern U.S. as a region appears to have potential for increased market penetration for Canadian red meat exports.
Article
Although food aid has been advocated for countries undertaking structural adjustment policies, political support for increased aid expenditures is lacking. Countertrade is proposed herein as a method for expanding food aid without increasing expenditures. Countertrade allows developing countries and the formerly centrally planned economies to accel...
Article
Full-text available
Bulk transport systems are usually product specific, highly automated and designed to handle generic commodities in large volumes. Grain is usually cited as an example of bulk cargo, but intermodal containers are becoming a serious competitor to the bulk handling of grain. Whereas bulk shippers must bear the brunt of a two-way haul, the intermodal...

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