Barry J. Cooper

Barry J. Cooper
University of South Australia | UniSA · School of Natural and Built Environments

Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy

About

53
Publications
14,738
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1,048
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
September 2008 - present
University of South Australia
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Full-text available
Heritage stones are stones that have special significance in human culture. The papers in this volume discuss a wide variety of such stones, including stones from Europe, Asia, North and South America, Africa and Australia. Igneous (basalt, porphyry and a variety of granites), sedimentary (sandstone, limestone) and metamorphic (marble, quartzite, g...
Article
Heritage stones are building and ornamental stones that have special significance in human culture. The papers in this volume discuss a wide variety of such materials, including stones from Europe, Asia, North and South America, Africa and Australia. Igneous (basalt, porphyry, granite), sedimentary (sandstone, limestone) and metamorphic (marble, qu...
Article
Full-text available
Marbles from Alpine area have been widely employed to build and decorate masterpieces and buildings which often represent the cultural heritage of an area (statuary, historic buildings and sculptures). Candoglia marble, object of the present research, is one of the most famous and appreciated marbles from Alpine area; it has been quarried since Rom...
Article
South Australia has the greatest utilisation of heritage or building stone in Australia because of its lack of timber resources. Consequently, natural stone was intensively used from the beginning of European colonisation. Building stones in South Australia, notable for their variety given the State’s diverse geology, can be challenging to designat...
Article
In Bavaria (Germany), between Solnhofen and Kelheim, numerous quarries allow utilization of a thinly plated Upper Jurassic limestone known in German as the Solnhofener Plattenkalk and in English as Solnhofen Limestone. Here limestone slabs have been quarried for centuries and it is not necessary to cut the limestone with a saw as it can be split co...
Article
Heritage stone was initially considered in terms of building stone; however, the use of natural stone extends much more widely into utilitarian applications, implements by prehistoric humans as well as decorative stones and gemstones. Nevertheless, there are limits to heritage stone designation where it may seem that recognition of a Global Heritag...
Article
Full-text available
Robert Bedford (1874-1951), based in the isolated community of Kyancutta in South Australia, was a unique contributor to world geology, specifically in the field of meteorites and fossil archaeocyatha. Born Robert Arthur Buddicom in Shropshire, UK, he was an Oxford graduate who worked as a scientist in Freiberg, Naples, Birmingham and Shrewsbury as...
Article
The justification for studying the history of geology is analysed from an Australian perspective. It is considered that history is an essential part of all geological research. With the rise in geological employment, a natural interest in professional history has also developed. A long history of mining in Australia with geological involvement has...
Article
David Oldroyd served a double term (1996–2004) as Secretary-General of INHIGEO, working with Hugh Torrens (1996–2000) and Manuel Pinto (2000–04) as Presidents. Meeting sites during this time included Beijing (1996), Liège (1997), Neuchâtel (1998), Freiberg (1999), Rio de Janeiro (2000), Lisbon and Aveiro (2001), Paris (2002), Dublin (2003) and Flor...
Article
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From the inception of universal land use planning in England and Wales in 1947, the concept of safeguarding mineral deposits from potential sterilisation by other development has been accompanied by a realisation that deposits vary in relative importance. However this differentiation has rarely been carried through to implementation and as far as i...
Article
The earliest human use of stone in Australia can be traced to Australia’s indigenous peoples. At least one example has been recorded of a “greenstone” being traded over a wide area for use as stone axes. With the establishment of British colonies in Australia from the late 18th century, a variety of additional stone types have been widely utilised....
Article
Full-text available
The commercial stone industry in Alvdalen, northwest of Stockholm, started in the second half of the 18th century as a social need. The region had been plagued by severe famine and there was an urgent need for additional wealth-generating industry. At that time it was already known that the porphyry in the area was similar to the "porfido rosso ant...
Article
Full-text available
This paper suggests Sydney sandstone as the first Global Heritage Stone Resource to be nominated from Australia. Sydney sandstone underlies much of the city of Sydney. It is also the most widely utilised dimension stone in the city. Its use in Sydney has extended over 200 years and it continues to be quarried today for Australian domestic use as we...
Article
Podpeč Limestone is characterized by its dark grey or nearly black colour, contrasting with white fossil shells of the mollusc Lithiotis. This formation, which has been dated as Lower Jurassic, occurs in southern and southwestern Slovenia and is particularly conspicuous in areas SW of Ljubljana. The main quarry, which is not active, is located near...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Heritage designation of specific materials that associate closely with human culture can also assist policymaker interest in stone built heritage, encourage the use of local natural stone and ensure the on-going availability of the natural stone resources that are required for the maintenance of the built heritage and the quality of new buildings....
Article
The proposal to designate those natural stones that have achieved widespread utilization in human culture was first mooted in late 2007, and first presented in a public forum at the 33rd International Geological Congress in July 2008. Over the next four years, a network of international correspondents was created, circulars were distributed, a webs...
Article
Building stone is a significant product in most human communities. While some civilizations paid more attention to the aesthetics of the stone, others focused more on physical properties, especially durability, as well as the ease of transportation to construction sites. These latter issues determined which rocks were exploited, in preference to ot...
Article
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Article
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Portland Stone, a well known ooidal limestone of Jurassic age from the United Kingdom is here nominated as a suitable "Global Heritage Stone Resource". Portland Stone is considered to ideally fit the newly proposed designation as it has been utilised since Roman times in England and since the Middle Ages in the construction of major historic buildi...
Article
Full-text available
The Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR) designation has been proposed to recognise dimension stone types that have achieved important utilisation in human culture. Within internationally recognised rules, a GHSR will be determined on the basis of significant use in human history, wide geographic range of utilisation, and the benefits that would a...
Article
Full-text available
The early Cambrian (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) Emu Bay Shale Lagerstätte of Kangaroo Island, South Australia is significant because it represents the best Burgess Shale type fauna in the southern hemisphere. Although the original locality near Big Gully occurs in coastal outcrops with large (up to 25 cm long) examples of the trilobite Redlichia ta...
Article
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Much early discussion on the glaciations now dated as late Neoproterozoic (Cryogenian) emanated from the small geological community working in South Australia in the early twentieth century, when their age was regarded as Lower Cambrian. An initial glacial interpretation of long known 'conglomerates' by H. P. Woodward was made as early as 1884. Pap...
Article
Full-text available
Creation of the new international designation of "Global Heritage Stone Resource " is here advocated as a means of recognising those building stone resources that are widely represented in human culture. With introduction of the new designation, the profile of many natural stone materials will be raised to prominence through the researching of cita...
Article
Full-text available
The discovery of uranium at Radium Hill in the Olary region in 1906 excited much public interest in South Australia as well as the attention of three of its most prominent scientists: W.H. Bragg, D. Mawson and H.Y.L. Brown. At the same time, radioactivity was recognised in the Moonta mines. The reaction of each was different with Bragg being reveal...
Article
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It is rare in the annals of science for a single publication to provide a definitive introduction to a previously unknown group of animals. Yet this was the case with the monograph that included the initial descriptions of an important, extinct group of fossil animals: the conodonts. The publication, by Christian Heinrich Pander, appeared in St Pet...
Article
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Article
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The potential for sedimentary uranium in South Australia was substantively overlooked for more than 60 years following the discovery of the Radium Hill uranium deposit in 1906, despite local knowledge of, and several expert visits to sedimentary uranium deposits in the Colorado Plateau region of the United States during subsequent years. In the lat...
Article
Full-text available
Silurian conodonts have been widely reported and many species have worldwide distribution. However, present zonations utilizing them have many limitations and no single scheme provides a suitable standard. A good standard zonation for Silurian conodonts is desirable, but impossible at our present state of knowledge. Environmental differentiation, t...
Article
Full-text available
A short, previously unpublished, geological report to the State Government in March 1906 by the young Douglas Mawson is earlier than any of Mawson's existing published works on South Australia. It resulted from his first visit to the Flinders Ranges with Walter Howchin and T. Griffith Taylor during the previous month. In this paper, the March 1906...
Article
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Small shelly fossils from the Wirrealpa and Aroona Creek Limestones, Flinders Ranges, and the temporally equivalent Ramsay Limestone, Yorke Peninsula, South Australia, are described and assessed. These formations have traditionally been assigned an early Middle Cambrian age. However, new data suggest that a late Early Cambrian age (equivalent to th...
Article
Full-text available
Late Palaeozoic spore/pollen stratigraphy in Australia is reviewed with reference to philosophy, terminology, biological basis, correlation potential and stratotypes. A series of simple, formal zones, based on the morphologic variation of the cheilocardioid spores are described as a step towards developing an Australia-wide standard. Representative...
Article
Early Cambrian sections on the Yorke Peninsula have been systematically sampled. Their profuse biotas of sponges, algae, molluscs, trilobites, ostracodes, hyoliths, tommotiids, coeloscleritophorans, anabaritids, and a variety of other small skeletal fossils are described. New genera erected are Endoconchia (cyanobacterium), Taraxaculum (sponge), Mi...
Article
The Early Cambrian Carrickalinga Head Formation, the basal unit of the Kanmantoo Group in the Fleurieu Peninsula-Mt Lofty Ranges area, rests conformably on the Heatherdale Shale or is faulted against Late Proterozoic (Adelaidean) sediments. The base of the Carrickalinga Head Formation represents a sequence boundary. On Fleurieu Peninsula, the Carri...
Article
Full-text available
Upper Silurian Conodonts from the Yarrangobilly Limestone, Southeastern New South Wales. Proc. Roy. Soc. Vict. 89: 183—194.

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Projects

Projects (4)
Archived project
Detailed studies of Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian conodont microfossils
Archived project
Research into the Cenozoic focussing on the St Vincent Basin
Archived project
Research into and documentation on the history of geology