Barney L. Lipscomb

Barney L. Lipscomb
Botanical Research Institute of Texas | BRIT · Research

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13
Publications
256
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212
Citations
Citations since 2017
0 Research Items
39 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Oklahoma is home to some 2,500 species of flowering plants. Patricia Folley has captured, in full color, some 200 striking and beautiful wildflowers. From the state wildflower (Gaillardia pulchella) to the state grass (Sorghastrum nutans), this wildflower guide covers plants growing in the Rocky Mountain foothills in the northwest to the cypress sw...
Article
Hydrocotyle sibthorpioides (Apiaceae) is reported as new to the Texas flora. Introduced species in the East Texas flora, as well as noxious plants and invasive exotics (including four particularly problematic species (Cuscuta japonica, Orobanche ramosa, Solanum viarum, and Triadica sebifera) are discussed.
Article
The current (2000) International Code of Botanical Nomenclature is open to divergent interpretation regarding the use of ranks. Article 4.1 outlines secondary ranks to be used between the principal ranks of family and species and below species. Article 4.2 states that ranks prefixed by "sub-" (termed here as "tertiary" rank, immediately subsidiary...
Article
Plant classification and nomenclature are in a continuing state of flux and heated debate between two opposing schools - 1) traditional taxonomists supporting "evolutionary" or "Linnaean taxonomy"; and 2) cladists supporting "phylogenetic systematics" or "cladonomy." While it is a multifaceted controversy that has spanned several decades, relativel...
Article
A specific case of the forensic use of animal-dispersed propagules is presented, and it is suggested that this type of evidence deserves wider utilization by the law enforcement community. Animal dispersed seeds and fruits are ubiquitous, often cling tenaciously to clothes or other materials worn or used by suspects, and are small and frequently go...

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