Barbara Bramanti

Barbara Bramanti
University of Oslo · Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis

31.61
 · 
PhD

About

91
Publications
15,070
Reads
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2,228
Citations
Research Experience
June 2013 - present
University of Oslo
Position
  • Researcher
February 2002 - January 2012
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Position
  • PostDoc Positions
December 1999 - December 2000
University of Florence
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (91)
Article
Full-text available
Background: A correct perception of the body image, as defined by comparison with actual anthropometric analyses, is crucial to ensure the best possible nutritional status of each individual. Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) represents a leading technique to assess body composition parameters and, in particular, the fat mass. This study examined the se...
Article
Full-text available
In December 2019, a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) from a new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) was recognized in the city of Wuhan, China. Rapidly, it became an epidemic in China and has now spread throughout the world reaching pandemic proportions. High mortality rates characterize SARS-CoV-2 disease (COVID-19), which mainly affects the el...
Article
Full-text available
. Gender medicine is the first step of personalized medicine and patient-centred care, an essential development to achieve the standard goal of a holistic approach to patients and diseases. By addressing the interrelation and integration of biological markers (i.e., sex) with indicators of psychological/cultural behaviour (i.e., gender), gender med...
Article
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Dental calculus, or mineralized plaque, represents a record of ancient biomolecules and food residues. Recently, ancient metagenomics made it possible to unlock the wealth of microbial and dietary information of dental calculus to reconstruct oral microbiomes and lifestyle of humans from the past. Although most studies have so far focused on ancien...
Article
In a forensic context, identification of skeletal injuries’ and traumas’ timing may be of fundamental relevance to understand the events related to the life and death of an individual. In this study, we propose a new evaluation form to facilitate the detection of traumas and interpret them as ante-, peri- or post-mortem injuries. We describe the us...
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative knowledge about which natural and anthropogenic factors influence the global spread of plague remains sparse. We estimated the worldwide spreading velocity of plague during the Third Pandemic, using more than 200 years of extensive human plague case records and genomic data, and analyzed the association of spatiotemporal environmental...
Article
Archaeological evidences of trepanation during the European Bronze Age are numerous, and testify a wide application of neurosurgical practices during Prehistory. In some particular cases, trepanations may be associated with other peculiar evidences concerning funerary practices. The aim of this paper is to present the case of a woman from the Recen...
Article
Full-text available
Plague has a long history on the European continent, with evidence of the disease dating back to the Stone Age. Plague epidemics in Europe during the First and Second Pandemics, including the Black Death, are infamous for their widespread mortality and lasting social and economic impact. Yet, Europe still experienced plague outbreaks during the Thi...
Article
Intra vitam porous lesions of the skull (Cribra Orbitalia and Porotic Hyperostosis) are pathological conditions due to genetic or acquired chronic anaemia. They are the most reported skeletal lesions in human skeletal remains and are routinely used to assess health, hygiene and nutritional status of past populations. Despite the existence of a numb...
Article
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In historical times, plague epidemics intermittently ravaged Europe for more than 1,400 years, and still represent a threat in many countries all over the world. A debate is ongoing about the past plague, if it killed randomly in a population or discriminated among persons on the basis of their biological features. To address questions of plague le...
Article
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Over the last few years, genomic studies on Yersinia pestis , the causative agent of all known plague epidemics, have considerably increased in numbers, spanning a period of about 5,000 y. Nonetheless, questions concerning historical reservoirs and routes of transmission remain open. Here, we present and describe five genomes from the second half o...
Article
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Louse-borne relapsing fever (LBRF) is known to have killed millions of people over the course of European history and remains a major cause of mortality in parts of the world. Its pathogen, Borrelia recurrentis, shares a common vector with global killers such as typhus and plague and is known for its involvement in devastating historical epidemics...
Article
Stature is a fundamental anthropometric character to trace the biological profile of a person. In some cases, when dismembered or mutilated bodies are discovered in a forensic context, it is essential to estimate stature from single districts of the body. Nevertheless, to date and worldwide, there are only few population-specific studies on stature...
Article
Full-text available
Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, can spread through human populations by multiple transmission pathways. Today, most human plague cases are bubonic, caused by spillover of infected fleas from rodent epizootics, or pneumonic, caused by inhalation of infectious droplets. However, little is known about the historical spread of plague i...
Article
Background: Negative lifestyle factors affect health outcomes adversely. The aim of the study was to assess body composition parameters and their relationship to several lifestyle behaviors among young Italian adults. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out on a sample of university students (n= 200; 50% males; 21.9 ± 2.0 years). Anthro...
Chapter
Full-text available
Plague caused by Yersinia pestis is a zoonotic infection, i.e., it is maintained in wildlife by animal reservoirs and on occasion spills over into human populations, causing outbreaks of different entities. Large epidemics of plague, which have had significant demographic, social, and economic consequences, have been recorded in Western European hi...
Article
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Here we present evidence to show that the pla gene, previously thought to be specific to Yersinia pestis, occurs in some strains of Citrobacter koseri and Escherichia coli. This means that detection of this gene on its own can no longer be taken as evidence of detection of Y. pestis.
Article
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The Black Death, originating in Asia, arrived in the Mediterranean harbors of Europe in 1347 CE, via the land and sea trade routes of the ancient Silk Road system. This epidemic marked the start of the second plague pandemic, which lasted in Europe until the early 19th century. This pandemic is generally understood as the consequence of a singular...
Article
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Shotgun metagenomics provides a powerful assumption-free approach to the recovery of pathogen genomes from contemporary and historical material. We sequenced the metagenome of a calcified nodule from the skeleton of a 14th-century middle-aged male excavated from the medieval Sardinian settlement of Geridu. We obtained 6.5-fold coverage of a Brucell...
Article
In Folge von klimatische und kulturelle Veränderungen, haben sich im Laufe der Zeit eine Reihe von Spezies, Tier- und Pflanzenarten aber auch Bakterien und Pilze entwickelt, andere sind ausgestorben. Spuren dieser Entwicklungen können wir heutzutage noch in den sterblichen Überresten unserer Vorfahren und ihrer Umwelt finden, indem wir gelernt habe...
Article
Die Pest begleitet unsere Geschichte seit der Antike. Immer wieder wurde sie nach Europa eingeschleppt, wo sie Millionen von Menschen das Leben kostete, bevor sie im 19. Jahrhundert aus Europa verschwand. Im Mittelalter wussten die Menschen nichts über Bakterien, auch die Übertragungswege wurden nicht immer erkannt. Die Pest galt oft als Strafe Got...
Poster
Gli autori presentano i risultati dell’indagine antropologica, paleopatologica e biomolecolare condotta sui resti scheletrici rinvenuti in Viale Sabotino a Milano, durante uno scavo di riqualificazione nel 2005-2006. Alcuni dati circostanziali, come il tipo di deposizione commista e senza cure, la giacitura disordinata dei corpi, la posizione del s...
Poster
Gli autori presentano i risultati dell’indagine antropologica, paleopatologica e biomolecolare condotta sui resti scheletrici rinvenuti in Viale Sabotino a Milano, durante uno scavo di riqualificazione nel 2005-2006. Alcuni dati circostanziali, come il tipo di deposizione commista (ma in connessione anatomica) e senza cure, la giacitura disordinata...
Article
Full-text available
Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of the disease plague, has been implicated in three historical pandemics. These include the third pandemic of the 19(th) and 20(th) centuries, during which plague was spread around the world, and the second pandemic of the 14(th)-17(th) centuries, which included the infamous epidemic known as the Black Death. Pr...
Article
Within the last 1.500 years, millions of people have died during three historical plague pandemics. Nowadays, modern medicine and preventative measures can contain the outbreaks, but plague becomes a risk when bacteria acquire new resistance genes. The deep knowledge of all modern and historical forms of Yersinia pestisis of great importance to und...
Article
Plague and cholera: Infectious pandemics of earlier centuries have left deep marks in our evolutionary history. Researchers are now recovering ancient DNA from the skeletons of the victims. The analysis of this DNA provides insights on the impact of these epidemics and the possible mechanisms of resistance against infections.
Article
Pest und Cholera: Die Infektions-Pandemien früherer Jahrhunderte haben tiefe Spuren in der Evolutionsgeschichte hinterlassen. Aus den Skeletten der Opfer gewinnen Forscher heute altes DNA-Material, dessen Analyse Aufschluss gibt über Krankheitsvirulenz und -resistenz.
Data
Amplified products obtained from the various samples analysed, using different sets of primers (0.86 MB DOC)
Data
Detailed archaeological and genetical information (0.08 MB DOC)
Data
Supplementary figures S1 to S6 of all aligned sequences (0.84 MB DOC)
Data
Results of the RDT analyses (0.10 MB DOC)
Data
Summary of the results and test of the hypothesis of false negatives among the negative controls (0.03 MB DOC)
Data
Primers used in this study (0.09 MB DOC)
Article
Full-text available
From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th) century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms...
Article
Full-text available
After the domestication of animals and crops in the Near East some 11,000 years ago, farming had reached much of central Europe by 7500 years before the present. The extent to which these early European farmers were immigrants or descendants of resident hunter-gatherers who had adopted farming has been widely debated. We compared new mitochondrial...
Article
Full-text available
Bone and tooth samples from sixteen individuals of the Vedrovice skeletal collection were submitted to ancient DNA (aDNA) analyses of mitochondrial as well as nuclear DNA. Compared with other aDNA prehistoric samples analysed at the University of Mainz aDNA laboratories, the Vedrovice samples are generally not among the best preserved due to a low...
Article
Full-text available
Lactase persistence (LP), the dominant Mendelian trait conferring the ability to digest the milk sugar lactose in adults, has risen to high frequency in central and northern Europeans in the last 20,000 years. This trait is likely to have conferred a selective advantage in individuals who consume appreciable amounts of unfermented milk. Some have a...
Article
Full-text available
The discovery of mitochondrial type N1a in Central European Neolithic skeletons at a high frequency enabled us to answer the question of whether the modern population is maternally descended from the early farmers instead of addressing the traditional question of the origin of early European farmers.