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Barbara Wueringer

Barbara Wueringer
Sharks And Rays Australia, Cairns, Australia

PhD

About

24
Publications
13,235
Reads
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404
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
254 Citations
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - present
Sharks and Rays Australia
Position
  • Director & Principal Scientist
January 2012 - June 2012
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Research Associate
October 2011 - October 2015
James Cook University
Position
  • Adjunct Senior Research Fellow
Education
June 2006 - March 2011
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Zoology
June 2002 - August 2005
University of Vienna
Field of study
  • Zoology
October 1999 - June 2002
University of Vienna
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Sharks, rays, and skates - the elasmobranchii - are currently not known to produce sounds in the wild. Here, we present multiple records of voluntary sound production in the wild, by two species of stingray, namely the mangrove whipray Urogymnus granulatus and the cowtail stingray Pastinachus ater. Sounds recorded from both species are characterise...
Article
Full-text available
Sawfishes are among the most threatened families of marine fishes and are susceptible to incidental capture in net fisheries. Since bycatch reduction devices currently used in trawl fisheries are not effective at reducing sawfish catches, new methods to minimise sawfish bycatch are needed. Ideally, these should affect sawfish behaviour and prevent...
Article
Full-text available
In the waters of southeast Australia, two species of sawshark—the common (Pristiophorus cirratus) and southern (Pristiophorus nudipinnis) sawshark—are frequent by-catch in commercial fisheries. While harvesting of both species is currently considered sustainable, there has been no investigation of whether P. cirratus and P. nudipinnis display genet...
Article
It has long been assumed that the elongated rostra (the saws) of sawsharks (Fam. Pristiophoridae) and sawfish (Fam. Pristidae) serve a similar function. Recent behavioural and anatomical studies have shed light on the dual function of the pristid rostrum in mechanosensory and electrosensory prey detection and prey manipulation. Here, we examine the...
Article
Populations of all species of sawfish have been depleted worldwide, and sawfish are now absent from much of their historic range. Much of the historic sawfish capture and encounter data does not provide information useful for species identification, and so cannot be used to reconstruct the historic ranges of the different species. For a long time,...
Article
In 2011, a male pristiophorid was caught by a prawn trawler north east of Cape Moreton, Queensland, Australia. Molecular analyses confirmed the specimen to be the common sawshark Pristiophorus cirratus. Historical catch data indicate the occurrence of the species in the region but this is the first verified record of P. cirratus occurring in the wa...
Article
Populations of all species of sawfish have been depleted worldwide, and sawfish are now absent from much of their historic range. Much of the historic sawfish capture and encounter data does not provide information useful for species identification, and so cannot be used to reconstruct the historic ranges of the different species. For a long time,...
Article
Full-text available
Within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area in Queensland, Australia, lack of information on the distribution of sawfishes presents difficulty for informed management of their habitats and populations. This study aims to provide insights into the historical and current distributions through analysis of sawfish by-catch records from the Queens...
Article
Potential roles of the rostrum of sawsharks (Pristiophoridae), including predation and self-defence, were assessed through a variety of inferential methods. Comparison of microwear on the surface of the rostral teeth of sawsharks and sawfishes (Pristidae) show that microwear patterns are alike and suggest that the elongate rostra in these two elasm...
Article
Full-text available
Stomach contents were collected from 117 yellow rays Urobatis jamaicensis from three locations in south Eleuthera, The Bahamas and compared with ambient infauna via sediment surveys. Diets were relatively limited with a total of 535 prey items recovered, representing five taxonomic groups and dominated by polychaetes and decapod crustaceans (87% of...
Article
The internal anatomy of the barbels of the common sawshark Pristiophorus cirratus was examined with light microscopy to clarify their sensory role. No sensory structures such as taste buds (chemoreception), ampullae of Lorenzini (electroreception) or free neuromasts (lateral line mechanoreception) could be located in the barbels. The presence of bu...
Article
Detailed computational fluid dynamics simulations for the rostrum of three species of sawfish (Pristidae) revealed that negligible turbulent flow is generated from all rostra during lateral swipe prey manipulation and swimming. These results suggest that sawfishes are effective stealth hunters that may not be detected by their teleost prey's latera...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation geneticist Nicole Phillips and zoologist Barbara Wueringer reveal how vital northern Australia is to the future of sawfish. Sensitive detector and lethal weapon combined, there are few implements in nature as versatile as the snout of a sawfish. With it, they home in on weak electrical pulses and eddies created by fish and crustaceans,...
Article
Full-text available
The arrangement of the electroreceptive ampullary system and closely related mechanoreceptive lateral line canal system was investigated in the epaulette shark, Hemiscyllium ocellatum. The lateral line canals form an elaborate network across the head and are continuously punctuated by pores. Ampullary pores are distributed in eleven distinct pore f...
Article
Full-text available
The ampullae of Lorenzini are the electroreceptors of elasmobranchs. Ampullary pores located in the elasmobranch skin are each connected to a gel-filled canal that ends in an ampullary bulb, in which the sensory epithelium is located. Each ampulla functions as an independent receptor that measures the potential difference between the ampullary pore...
Article
Full-text available
In the aquatic environment, living organisms emit weak dipole electric fields, which spread in the surrounding water. Elasmobranchs detect these dipole electric fields with their highly sensitive electroreceptors, the ampullae of Lorenzini. Freshwater sawfish, Pristis microdon, and two species of shovelnose rays, Glaucostegus typus and Aptychotrema...
Article
Jawed fishes that possess an elongated rostrum use it to either sense prey or to manipulate it, but not for both. The billfish rostrum, for instance, lacks any sensory function and is used to stun prey [1 • Shimose T. • Yokawa K. • Saito H. • Tachihara K. Evidence for use of the bill by blue marlin, Makaira nigricans, during feeding.Ichthyol. Res....
Article
Full-text available
The distribution and density of the ampullary electroreceptors in the skin of elasmobranchs are influenced by the phylogeny and ecology of a species. Sensory maps were created for 4 species of pristid sawfish. Their ampullary pores were separated into pore fields based on their innervation and cluster formation. Ventrally, ampullary pores are locat...
Article
Full-text available
The lateral line system allows elasmobranchs to detect hydrodynamic movements in their close surroundings. We examined the distribution of pit organs and lateral line canals in 4 species of sawfish (Anoxypristis cuspidata, Pristis microdon, P. clavata and P. zijsron). Pit organs could only be located in A. cuspidata, which possesses elongated pits...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanoreceptive and electroreceptive anatomical specialisations in freshwater elasmobranch fishes are largely unknown. The freshwater whipray, Himantura dalyensis, is one of a few Australian elasmobranch species that occur in low salinity (oligohaline) environments. The distribution and morphology of the mechanoreceptive lateral line and the elect...
Article
Full-text available
Small epidermal pores of the electrosensory ampullae of Lorenzini located both ventrally and dorsally on the disk of Aptychotrema rostrata (Shaw and Nodder, 1794) open to jelly-filled canals, the distal end of which widens forming an ampulla that contains 6 ± 0.7 alveolar bulbs (n = 13). The sensory epithelium is restricted to the alveolar bulbs an...
Article
Full-text available
Sclerorhynchids (extinct sawfishes, Batoidea), pristids (extant sawfish, Batoidea) and pristiophorids (sawsharks, Squalomorphi) are the three elasmobranch families that possess an elongated rostrum with lateral teeth. Sclerorhynchids are the extinct sawfishes of the Cretaceous period, which reached maximum total lengths of 100 cm. The morphology of...
Article
Full-text available
The anatomical characteristics of the mechanoreceptive lateral line system and electrosensory ampullae of Lorenzini of Rhinobatos typus and Aptychotrema rostrata are compared. The spatial distribution of somatic pores of both sensory systems is quite similar, as lateral line canals are bordered by electrosensory pore fields. Lateral line canals for...

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Projects (2)
Project
Monitor sawfish and their habitats in Western Australia Freshwater (or Largetooth) Sawfish Dwarf Sawfish Green Sawfish