Barbara Strobl

Barbara Strobl
University of Zurich | UZH · Department of Geography

PhD

About

12
Publications
3,759
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243
Citations
Citations since 2017
12 Research Items
243 Citations
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Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Macroplastic pollution (> 0.5 cm) negatively impacts aquatic life and threatens human livelihood on land, in oceans and river systems. Reliable information on the origin, fate and pathways of plastic in river systems is required to optimize prevention, mitigation and reduction strategies. Yet, accurate and long-term data on plastic transport are st...
Article
Crowd‐based hydrological observations can supplement existing monitoring networks and allow data collection in regions where otherwise no data would be available. In the citizen science project CrowdWater, repeated water level observations using a virtual staff gauge approach result in time series of water level classes. To investigate the quality...
Article
Full-text available
Some form of training is often necessary for citizen science projects. While in some citizen science projects, it is possible to keep tasks simple so that training requirements are minimal, other projects include more challenging tasks and, thus, require more extensive training. Training can be a hurdle to joining a project, and therefore most citi...
Article
Full-text available
While hydrological models generally rely on continuous streamflow data for calibration, previous studies have shown that a few measurements can be sufficient to constrain model parameters. Other studies have shown that continuous water level or water level class (WL-class) data can be informative for model calibration. In this study, we combined th...
Article
Hydrological data are crucial for a better understanding of hydrological processes and can help improve models to predict floods and droughts, to allocate water resources and to better manage hydropower. However, hydrological data are often scarce, as gauging stations are expensive to build and maintain. Citizen science can help fill such data gaps...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. Some form of training is often necessary in citizen science projects. While in many citizen science projects it is possible to keep tasks simple so that training requirements are minimal, some projects include more challenging tasks and, thus, require more extensive training. Training can hinder joining a project, and therefore most citiz...
Article
Full-text available
Data quality control is important for any data collection program, especially in citizen science projects, where it is more likely that errors occur due to the human factor. Ideally, data quality control in citizen science projects is also crowdsourced so that it can handle large amounts of data. Here we present the CrowdWater game as a gamified me...
Article
Full-text available
Hydrological observations are crucial for decision making for a wide range of water resource challenges. Citizen science is a potentially useful approach to complement existing observation networks to obtain this data. Previous projects, such as CrowdHydrology, have demonstrated that it is possible to engage the public in contributing hydrological...
Article
Die Bürgerwissenschaft (Citizen Science) ist ein potenziell interessanter Ansatz, um bestehende hydrologische Messnetzwerke zu ergänzen und Daten für das Wasserressourcenmanagement zu erheben. Hydrologische Beobachtungen basieren jedoch normalerweise auf der Verwendung von Messinstrumenten. Dies begrenzt die Möglichkeit für Beobachtungen durch Bürg...
Article
Streamflow data are important for river management and the calibration of hydrological models. However, such data are only available for gauged catchments. Citizen science offers an alternative data source, and can be used to estimate streamflow at ungauged sites. We evaluated the accuracy of crowdsourced streamflow estimates for 10 streams in Swit...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies have shown that hydrological models can be parameterised using a limited number of streamflow measurements. Citizen science projects can collect such data for otherwise ungauged catchments but an important question is whether these observations are informative given that these streamflow estimates will be uncertain. We assess the v...
Article
Citizen scientists keep a watchful eye on the world's streams, catching intermittent streams in action and filling data gaps to construct a more complete hydrologic picture.

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
A grand challenge in hydrology is understanding how rainfall is stored in catchments and how stored water eventually becomes streamflow. Decades of studies have shown that the majority of streamflow arises from previously stored water exfiltrating as it is displaced by incoming rainfall. Thus, stream discharge and streamwater quality are tightly coupled to the temporal variations in catchment water storage. However, only few studies have experimentally investigated the relationships between subsurface water storage and streamflow generation at the catchment scale because extensive instrumentations are required for monitoring ground- and streamwater properties. In the TempAqua project, we will utilize the temporary stream network in montane catchments as a natural indicator of catchment water storage variations: the geometry and extent of the temporary stream network demonstrate where flows exceed subsurface hydraulic transmissivity at any point in time. Thus, when subsurface water storages are greatest, the stream network should be most extensive; in contrast, in times of drought when water storages are depleted, the temporary stream network should be least extensive. Until now, experimental data sets on temporary stream networks dynamics are rare because data collection faces several challenges: visual mapping of actively flowing streams can be very subjective and time consuming; aerial surveys are not practical in forested or snow-covered terrain or during precipitation events; satellite images are too coarse to distinguish small headwater channels (<0.5m width) from the surrounding landscape and are not usable when clouds cover the view. Therefore, in this project, we will continuously map temporary stream networks through wireless sensor network technology in multiple montane headwater catchments in Switzerland with the ultimate goal to infer how different storages in the landscape release water into streams. In addition, hydrochemical data and stable water isotopes will be used as environmental tracers to quantify the dominant flow pathways and water sources that contribute to streamflow. Finally, the linkages between catchment storage variations and temporary stream networks will be explored through numerical hydrological modeling frameworks. The catchment models will then serve as hypothesis-testing tools to assess how future climate change will affect water availability in the montane study regions. The outcomes of this project will have great relevance for improving our process understanding of water sources, biogeochemical fluxes, and ecological habitat resilience in mountainous environments - under actual and prospective future conditions.
Archived project
For the current project page, visit https://www.researchgate.net/project/CrowdWater This PhD project aims to examine the potential of “crowdsourcing”, meaning observations of voluntary participants. As the name suggests, the project looks at the potential of crowdsourcing in the field of hydrology.
Project
We study how the public can contribute to the collection of hydrological observations and how useful these data might be for hydrological modelling (or other uses). For more info, see https://crowdwater.ch/