Barbara Jane Anderson

Barbara Jane Anderson
Otago Museum · Research

BSc.(Hons.) PhD.

About

68
Publications
29,980
Reads
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4,233
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
2366 Citations
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Introduction
I’m a quantitative ecologist working on the interplay between biotic interactions, microclimate and the effects of environmental change (e.g., climate change, light pollution, habitat change). This research involves plants, Lepidoptera; and conservation prioritization investigating possibilities for trade-offs between biodiversity and ecosystem services e.g. carbon storage.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - present
Otago Museum
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Ahi Pepe MothNet Coordinator “Battlegrounds and safe havens: disentangling the roles of ecology and evolution in the response of biological communities to climate change”
November 2013 - September 2018
Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • “Battlegrounds and safe havens: disentangling the roles of ecology and evolution in the response of biological communities to climate change”
May 2012 - present
James Cook University
Position
  • Rainforest Biodiversity
Description
  • Conservation Prioritization Dynamic distribution modelling and Community structure analyses for the Australian Wet Tropics.

Publications

Publications (68)
Article
Climate change is leading to the development of land-based mitigation and adaptation strategies that are likely to have substantial impacts on global biodiversity. Of these, approaches to maintain carbon within existing natural ecosystems could have particularly large benefits for biodiversity. However, the geographical distributions of terrestrial...
Article
1. Ecosystems support biodiversity and also provide goods and services that are beneficial to humans. The extent to which the locations that are most valuable for ecosystem services coincide with those that support the most biodiversity is of critical importance when designing conservation and land management strategies. There are, however, few stu...
Article
Full-text available
We link spatially explicit climate change predictions to a dynamic metapopulation model. Predictions of species' responses to climate change, incorporating metapopulation dynamics and elements of dispersal, allow us to explore the range margin dynamics for two lagomorphs of conservation concern. Although the lagomorphs have very different distribut...
Article
Full-text available
Land cover change is a key component of anthropogenic global environmental change, contributing to changes in environmental conditions of habitats. Deforestation is globally the most widespread and anthropogenically driven land cover change leading to conversion from closed forest to open non-forest habitat. This study investigates the relative rol...
Article
Full-text available
A large array of species distribution model (SDM) approaches have been developed for explaining and predicting the occurrences of individual species or species assemblages. Given the wealth of existing models, it is unclear which models perform best for interpolation or extrapolation of existing data sets, particularly when one is concerned with sp...
Article
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Local and Indigenous Peoples play critical roles in safeguarding global biological and cultural diversity. However, species distribution modelling has yet to incorporate perspectives that assess threats to the linked biological and cultural systems of local and Indigenous Peoples. Here, we provide the first example of integrating species distributi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Land cover change is a key component of anthropogenic global environmental change, contributing to changes in environmental conditions of habitats. These changes can lead to the redistribution of species and shifts in the functional composition and properties of ecosystems. Deforestation is globally the most widespread anthropogenically driven land...
Article
Plant-derived lipid molecular proxies can provide insight into present-day soil carbon input and to what extent organic carbon is degraded within soil. To explore whether soil characteristics of ‘primary’ (i.e., native grasslands above the historic treeline) and ‘secondary’ (i.e., human-modified grasslands below the historic treeline) grasslands re...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Current species niche is not determined by just current environments but history of environments such as evolutionary processes and past large-scale events. Evolutionary processes have shaped genetic relatedness of present taxa. The genetic relatedness therefore has been believed to explain differences in ecological features of taxa for long. For e...
Article
Full-text available
The Otago Museum houses one of New Zealand’s largest Lepidoptera collections that consists of more than 31,000 macro moth specimens collected across New Zealand over the last 30 years. Alongside this collection, supplementary information is found in detailed field notebooks that cover, for most sites, the total abundance of the different species pr...
Chapter
Most ecological studies of the effects of climate on species are based on average conditions above ground level (measured by meteorological stations) averaged across 100 km2 or larger areas. However, most terrestrial organisms experience conditions in a much smaller area at the ground surface or within vegetation canopies, the climate of which can...
Article
Evolutionary priority effects, where early-arriving lineages occupy niche space via diversification and preclude dominance of later arrivals, have been observed in alpine and forest communities. However, the potential for evolutionary priority effects to persist in an era of rapid global change remains unclear. Here, we use a natural experiment of...
Article
Full-text available
Gradients in environmental conditions, including climate factors and resource availability, occur along mountain inclines, providing a 'natural laboratory' to explore their combined impacts on microbial distributions. Conflicting spatial patterns observed across elevation gradients in soil bacterial community structure suggest that they are driven...
Article
Ecologists often wish to describe mathematical relationships between response variables and climate covariates in spatial models of species distribution; these relationships are commonly termed climate envelopes. There are many situations when the functional form of the envelopes should be either unimodal or monotonic, but current practice tends to...
Article
Modern species distribution models account for spatial autocorrelation in order to obtain unbiased statistical inference on the effects of covariates, to improve the model's predictive ability through spatial interpolation and to gain insight in the spatial processes shaping the data. Somewhat analogously, hierarchical approaches to community-level...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Little is known about the ecological conditions promoting evolutionary priority effects, when the order of ancestral species arrival into a new habitat influences extant community structure. Evidence suggests that evolutionary priority effects operate through niche pre-emption, where occupation of niche space by early-ar...
Article
Full-text available
A cornerstone of conservation is the designation and management of protected areas (PAs): locations often under conservation management containing species of conservation concern, where some development and other detrimental influences are prevented or mitigated. However, the value of PAs for conserving biodiversity in the long term has been questi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A key challenge in theoretical and applied ecology is understanding how individual species shift or adapt to changing climatic conditions and how this affects their interactions with other species and the resulting community composition and function. Temperature decreases with elevation; therefore, in a warming climate the expectation is that speci...
Article
Climate envelope models (CEMs) are used to assess species’ vulnerability to predicted changes in climate, based on their distributions. Extinction risk, however, also depends on demographic parameters. Accordingly, we use CEMs for 18 seabird species to test three hypotheses: (i) population sizes are larger in areas where CEMs fitted using distribut...
Article
Species’ abundances vary in space and time. Describing these patterns is a cornerstone of macroecology. Moreover, trends in population size are an important criterion for the assessment of a species’ conservation status. Because abundance trends are not homogeneous in space, we need to quantify variation in abundance trends across the geographical...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To be effective conservation planning for the 22nd century needs a threefold strategy. Firstly, priority must be given to those areas that best protect biodiversity from current threats (including non-climate change related threats). Secondly, the areas that are currently the most suitable may under a changing climate become marginal or even climat...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Conservation prioritization or reserve selection is fundamentally about trade-offs. Given finite resources which pieces of the landscape give the highest return for biodiversity? In order to succeed we need to be explicit in our definition of our goals. Are we more concerned about current threats and declining species or are we more concerned that...
Book
Full-text available
Severe climatic changes are predicted for Australia before the close of this century. Climate change threatens biodiversity in all ecosystems; a management and conservation priority is to identify areas and habitats — refuges — that could shelter species from the worst impacts. Freshwater ecosystems contain high biodiversity, but are especially vul...
Book
Full-text available
We are currently facing the likelihood of severe climate change before the close of the century. In the face of such a global driver of species loss, we urgently need to identify refugia that will shelter species from the worst impacts of climate change. This will be a critical component of successful conservation and management of our biodiversity...
Article
Aim Species' distributions change through time, and many species have recently shifted their ranges in response to anthropogenic climate change. How-ever, predicting future distributional changes remains a challenge. We tested the ability of climate-only distributional models, built using present-day climate data, to project distributions of four E...
Article
Aim: Global conservation policies, such as the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) decision to aim for the protection of 17% of the area of terrestrial ecosystems by 2020, are typically realized at national levels. We investigate the difference between continentally coordinated conservation versus nationally devolved conservation, in a manner...
Article
Full-text available
Vegetation texture, describing plant communities by the range of characters present in them, can describe functional variation more effectively than using the identities of the species. We ask whether spatial trends, as seen in spatial autocorrelation (SAc), are stronger in vegetation texture. We also ask in what environment SAc is stronger, whethe...
Chapter
Full-text available
Bryophytes, especially mosses, represent a largely untapped resource for monitoring and indicating effects of climate change on the living environment. They are tied very closely to the external environment and have been likened to 'canaries in the coal mine'. Bryophyte Ecology and Climate Change is the first book to bring together a diverse array...
Article
Full-text available
Very little is known of how disturbance affects community assembly rules. We examine this in three disturbance states in each of two ski areas on southern New Zealand mountains. Theory suggests that a community will become progressively more spatially organized during recovery from disturbance. Firstly, different patches of the community should bec...
Article
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1. Species-abundance distributions (SADs) are a convenient and common method for describing ecological communities. Despite their long history and the cornucopia of theoretical models, which have been suggested to describe them, no agreement has been reached as to which models are best. 2. This lack of agreement is in part owing to the inherent di...
Article
Full-text available
The benefits of protected areas (PAs) for biodiversity have been questioned in the context of climate change because PAs are static, whereas the distributions of species are dynamic. Current PAs may, however, continue to be important if they provide suitable locations for species to colonize at their leading-edge range boundaries, thereby enabling...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Climate change is predicted to lead to widespread changes in population dynamics, but quantitative predictions have rarely been tested empirically. We analysed historical abundance data of bird species continuously sampled during breeding season from 1970 to 1974 and from 1998 to 2002 over 756 routes from the Breeding...
Article
Many species are expanding at their leading-edge range boundaries in response to climate warming. Species are known to respond individualistically to climate change, but there has been little consideration of whether responses are consistent over time. We compared responses of 37 southerly distributed British butterflies over two study periods, fir...
Article
Full-text available
Different vegetation types can generate variation in microclimates at local scales, potentially buffering species from adverse climates. To determine if species could respond to such microclimates under climatic warming, we evaluated whether ectothermic species (butterflies) can exploit favourable microclimates and alter their use of different habi...
Article
Full-text available
A growing literature aims to identify areas of congruence in the provision of multiple ecosystem goods and services. However, little attention has been paid to the effect that temporal variation in the provision of such services may have on understanding of these relationships. Due to a lack of temporally and spatially replicated monitoring surveys...
Article
Full-text available
To inform the design and implementation of land-use policies that consider the variety of goods and services people derive from ecosystems, it is essential to understand spatial patterns of individual services, how multiple services relate to each other, and how these relationships vary across spatial scales and localities. Despite the importance o...
Article
Pressure on ecosystems to provide various different and often conflicting services is immense and likely to increase. The impacts and success of conservation prioritization will be enhanced if the needs of competing land uses are recognized at the planning stage. We develop such methods and illustrate them with data about competing land uses in Gre...
Article
Aim Determining the mechanisms underlying climatic limitation of species distributions is essential for understanding responses to current climatic change. Disentangling direct (e.g. physiological) and indirect (e.g. trophic) effects of climate on distributions through occurrence-based modelling is problematic because most species use the same area...
Article
Many species appear to be undergoing shifts in phenology, arising from climate change. To predict the direction and magnitude of future changes requires an understanding of how phenology depends on climatic variation. Species show large-scale spatial variation in phenology (affected by differentiation among populations) as well as variation in phen...
Article
An increasing number of studies are taking the important first step in global efforts to conserve key ecosystem services by mapping their spatial distributions. However, a lack of primary data for most services in most places has largely forced such mapping exercises to be based on proxies. The common way of producing these proxies is through benef...
Article
1. Current national and international frameworks for assessing threats to species have not been developed in the context of climate change, and are not framed in a way that recognises new opportunities that arise from climate change. 2. The framework presented here separates the threats and benefits of climate change for individual species. Threat...
Article
In human-dominated regions, protected areas are complemented by other conservation strategies (e.g., restrictive zoning, incentive payments) to maintain biodiversity and other ecosystem services. These strategies are often not mutually exclusive, with many areas covered by multiple (tiered) management strategies. However, it is not known whether ti...
Article
1. An increasing number of studies are examining the distribution and congruence of ecosystem services, often with the goal of identifying areas that will provide multiple ecosystem service ‘hotspots’. However, there is a paucity of data on most ecosystem services, so proxies (e.g. estimates of a service for a particular land cover type) are freque...
Article
Climate change is causing many organisms to migrate to track climatically-suitable habitat. In many cases, this will happen naturally, but in others, human intervention may be necessary in the form of ‘assisted colonisation’. Species re-establishments in suitable parts of their historic ranges provide an opportunity to conserve some species and to...
Article
Full-text available
The hope among policy-makers and scientists alike is that conservation strategies designed to protect biodiversity also provide direct benefits to people by protecting other vital ecosystem services. The few studies that have examined the delivery of ecosystem services by existing conservation efforts have concentrated on large, 'wilderness'-style...
Article
Predicting when and where species are likely to experience inter-specific interactions as a result of climate change may be as relevant to understanding their evolutionary futures as predicting responses to physical environmental variables. In this paper, models built using data for the distributions of two species of large house spider, Tegenaria...
Article
Distribution models are commonly used to generalise across species distributions, to project future potential range changes, and to identify potential areas for species reintroductions and recovery plans. Building several models that incorporate different potential causal factors is a useful way of formalising alternative hypotheses. We developed a...
Article
A principal goal of protected-area networks is to maintain viable populations of as many species as possible, particularly those that are vulnerable to environmental change outside reserves. Ideally, one wants to be able to protect all biodiversity when selecting priority areas for conservation. Using the area-prioritization algorithm ZONATION, we...
Article
Full-text available
Why do areas with high numbers of small-range species occur where they do? We found that, for butterfly and plant species in Europe, and for bird species in the Western Hemisphere, such areas coincide with regions that have rare climates, and are higher and colder areas than surrounding regions. Species with small range sizes also tend to occur in...
Article
Full-text available
The processes underlying parasitoid community structure are little known. Stochastic niche-apportionment models provide one route to underlying assemblage rules in this and other groups. Previous work has applied this approach to parasitoids found on single host species in single populations. However, parasitoid communities are known to extend acro...
Article
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Global anthropogenic climate change is contributing to the considerable economic imbalance between rich and poor nations. The changing climate will inevitably influence natural resources, but it is the poorest countries—where humans rely most directly on natural systems for their livelihoods—that are expected to experience the greatest changes. Acc...
Article
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Stochastic niche apportionment models use a simple rule-based approach to simulate the process of community structure. These models were used to seek a general rule of community structure by investigating saltmeadow vegetation from New Zealand, South America and southern Europe. The patterns of relative abundances generated by 5 such models were th...
Article
By building multiple models, the predicted priority landscapes for Wales need not rely on the single model which is apparently ‘best’ (Whittingham et al. 2006). Rather, the consensus and range of predictions can be taken into account when planning conservation action. We believe that the consensus connectivity surface shown in Fig. 4c represents th...
Article
Full-text available
Both local and regional factors determine local species richness. We investigated the relative role of local (13 soil and tree stand structure variables) and regional factors (19 climate, land cover and geographic location variables) in determining the richness of several vascular plant functional groups in indigenous forest fragments in southeaste...
Article
The considerable differences in biology between bryophytes and higher plants have led to speculation that their community structure might be different. Ten bryophyte communities were sampled for species biomass composition, and for comparison ten higher-plant communities that were similar in physiognomy and in total community biomass. The rather in...
Article
Full-text available
A major gap in our knowledge of plant communities is how much of their volume is occupied by plant material (stem, leaf or reproductive structure). This is basic knowledge and may be crucial for the concept of competition for space. We sampled two grassland communities and two shrublands in both Italy and New Zealand. The height of the canopy was m...
Article
Full-text available
Comparison of local species richness with the size of the species pool has the potential to distinguish between niche-limited and pool-limited community structure.Pärtel et al.,Oikos 75: 111–117, 1997, introduced a method intended to do this. However, their method is not ecologically or statistically valid. It gives highly significant results when...
Article
Four sites were sampled to determine spatial autocorrelation in vegetation at the community level. All were in western New Zealand, but on different substrates and of different physiognomy: a terrace forest, a floodplain forest, a mire and the middle of a logging road. In ‘dissimograms’the four communities all showed steady increases in dissimilari...