B. Claramunt-López

B. Claramunt-López
CREAF Centre for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications | CREAF

PhD

About

77
Publications
17,149
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,840
Citations
Citations since 2017
22 Research Items
1384 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Introduction
B.Claramunt López currently works at CREAF Centre for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications. B.C. does research in Environmental Science, Citizen Science, Forestry and Soil Science. His most recent publication is 'Multiple geographic origins and high genetic differentiation of the Alpine marmots reintroduced in the Pyrenees.'

Publications

Publications (77)
Article
Full-text available
Larger geographical areas contain more species—an observation raised to a law in ecology. Less explored is whether biodiversity changes are accompanied by a modification of interaction networks. We use data from 32 spatial interaction networks from different ecosystems to analyse how network structure changes with area. We find that basic community...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging in the 1990s, bioblitzes have become flagship events for biodiversity assessments. Although the format varies, a bioblitz is generally an intensive, short-term survey in a specific area. Bioblitzes collect biodiversity data and can therefore play a role in research, discovery of new species at a site and monitoring. They may also promote p...
Article
Full-text available
The Coccinellidae (ladybird) family is one of the most iconic Coleopteran families, yet little has been published about this group in the Principality of Andorra. This study aims to fill in some of the gaps in knowledge regarding this group in the country with the addition of five country records. Methods of collection, description of habitat, and...
Article
Full-text available
This paper aims to highlight the importance of fast and safe documentation of the damage to cultural heritage after a natural or anthropic catastrophe, with greater relevance of civil society. In these situations, in which humanitarian aid to the population and care needs are the priorities for the local authorities, proper prior planning of data c...
Article
Full-text available
Geographic variation in acoustic signals has been investigated for five decades to better understand the evolution of communication. When receivers are able to discriminate among signals and to react accordingly, geographic variation can have major impacts on the ability of conspecifics to communicate. Surprisingly, geographic variation in alarm ca...
Article
Full-text available
New records for the fauna of Limoniidae and Tipulidae (Diptera) in the Iberian Peninsula and updating list of species of Serra de Collserola Natural Park, Catalonia In this paper, the number of known species of the Collserola Natural Park is increased, of which Dicranomyia (Dicranomyia) lorettae Geiger, 1985 constitutes the first record for the Ibe...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Increases in woody plant and shrub cover render alpine livestock less efficient at using their landscape, finds a new study of the eastern Spanish Pyrenees. Changes in land use and climate will affect not only flora and fauna but also the futures of alpine farmers, says the study, placing them at a growing economic risk both throughout Europe and w...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Increases in woody plant and shrub cover render alpine livestock less efficient at using their landscape, finds a new study of the eastern Spanish Pyrenees. Changes in land use and climate will affect not only flora and fauna but also the futures of alpine farmers, says the study, placing them at a growing economic risk both throughout Europe and w...
Article
In this paper, we analyze the paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental evolution of Laguna Yema in semi-arid Chaco region of Argentina over the past six hundred years. High resolution multiproxy studies of lake sediments utilize analyses of lithology, mineralogy, geochemistry, palynology, and are constrained by radiocarbon and gamma spectrometry dating...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in land‐use and climate affect the distribution and diversity of plant and animal species at different spatiotemporal scales. The extent to which species‐specific phenotypic plasticity and biotic interactions mediate organismal adaptation to changing environments, however, remains poorly understood. Woody plant expansion is threatening the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Mountain environments are amongst the most threatened environments by global warming, with already evident effects (e.g. glacier melting). Studying how species are adapting to these new conditions and how they may take advantage of new opportunities is fundamental to understand the global process of climate change. Passerine birds are the most abun...
Article
Species-area relationships (SARs) are pivotal to understand the distribution of biodiversity across spatial scales. We know little, however, about how the network of biotic interactions in which biodiversity is embedded changes with spatial extent. Here we develop a new theoretical framework that enables us to explore how different assembly mechani...
Article
The golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the most important birds of prey in the Northern Hemisphere. This raptor is used to building large nests in high cliffs to which they return for several breeding years accumulating important amounts of their prey skeletal remains. This makes the golden eagle one of the major predators able to accumulat...
Article
Full-text available
Reintroductions inherently involve a small number of founders leading reintroduced populations to be prone to genetic drift and, consequently, to inbreeding depression. Assessing the origins as the genetic diversity and structure of reintroduced populations compared to native populations are thus crucial to foresee their future. Here, we aim to cla...
Article
Full-text available
Attacks by big cats on livestock are one of the major causes of human-felid conflicts and, therefore, an important factor in the conservation of these species. it has been argued that a reduction in natural prey abun-dance promotes attacks on domestic species, but few studies have tested this statement, and some have delivered contradictory results...
Article
Full-text available
Key message The retrospective analysis of wood anatomical features evidences how a long-term deterioration of hydraulic performance and carbon use portend drought-induced mortality in Scots pine. Abstract Widespread episodes of drought-induced tree mortality are predicted to become more frequent as climate becomes warmer and drier. Nevertheless,...
Article
Full-text available
Se presenta el primer estudio sobre dendroclimatología de Pinus pseudostrobus y Pinus devoniana en el estado de Michoacán (México). El estudio se realizó en los municipios de Áporo y Zitácuaro de la Reserva de la Biosfera de la Mariposa Monarca (RBMM). Se colectaron cien testimonios de madera tomados a 1.3 m de altura del árbol, repartidas en los e...
Article
Full-text available
In most species, males compete to gain both matings (via pre-copulatory competition) and fertilizations (via post-copulatory competition) to maximize their reproductive success. However, the quantity of resources devoted to sexual traits is finite, and so males are predicted to balance their investment between pre- and post-copulatory expenditure d...
Article
Global change is increasing the occurrence of perturbation events on natural communities, with biological invasions posing a major threat to ecosystem integrity and functioning worldwide. Most studies addressing biological invasions have focused on individual species or taxonomic groups to understand both, the factors determining invasion success a...
Article
Widespread drought-induced tree mortality has been documented around the world, and could increase in frequency and intensity under warmer and drier conditions. Ecophysiological differences between dying and surviving trees might underlie predispositions to mortality, but are poorly documented. Here we report a study of Scots pines (Pinus sylvestri...
Article
Full-text available
Context After wildfire, surviving trees are of major ecological importance as they can help in the post-fire regeneration process. Although these trees may be damaged, they may also benefit from reduced fuel hazard and competition. However, little is known about the long-term growth response of surviving trees. Aims This study aims to explain short...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Aims Forest trees directly contribute to carbon cycling in forest soils through the turnover of their fine roots. In this study we aimed to calculate root turnover rates of common European forest tree species and to compare them with most frequently published values. Methods We compiled available European data and applied various tur...
Article
Full-text available
El pino albar (Pinus sylvestris) es uno de los árboles más ampliamente distribuidos del mundo. Pese a su gran plasticidad ecológica, numerosos estudios muestran que su capacidad de resistir la sequía se está viendo superada en diversas zonas, especialmente en la cuenca mediterránea, donde se halla el límite meridional de su distribución. El present...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is generating novel communities composed of new combinations of species. These result from different degree of species adaptations to changing biotic and abiotic conditions, and from differential range shifts of species. To determin whether the responses of organisms are determined by particular species traits and how species interac...
Article
Full-text available
The current distribution of climatic conditions will be rearranged on the globe. To survive, species will have to keep pac with climates as they move. Mountains are among the most affected regions owing to both climate and land-use change. Here we explore the effects of climate change in the vertebrate food web of the Pyrenees. We investigate eleva...
Article
Drought-related tree mortality has become a widespread phenomenon. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is a boreal species with high ecological amplitude that reaches its southwestern limit in the Iberian Peninsula. Thus, Iberian Scots pine populations are particularly good models to study the effects of the increase in aridity predicted by climate ch...
Article
Characterizing the responses of key tree species to extreme climatic events may provide important information for predicting future forest responses to increased climatic variability. Here we aimed at determining which tree- and stand-level attributes were more closely associated with the effect of a severe drought on the radial growth of Scots pin...
Article
Full-text available
The use of artificial nest boxes has led to significant progress in bird conservation and in our understanding of the functional and evolutionary ecology of free-ranging birds that exploit cavities for roosting and reproduction. Nest boxes and their improved accessibility have made it easier to perform comparative and experimental field investigati...
Article
Full-text available
1. The introduction of non-native species can pose environmental and economic risks, but under some conditions, introductions can serve conservation or recre- ational objectives. To minimize risks, introductions should be conducted following the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s guidelines and should include an initial assessment and...
Article
Regeneration of original dry forests and shrublands in degraded arid and semiarid ecosystems can be a slow and difficult process. It has been hypothesized that restoration efforts during periods of increased water availability may potentially trigger shifts back to a high vegetation cover depending on several environmental factors that govern the r...
Article
Alpine marmots were introduced into the northern Pyrenees between 1948 and 1988 from individuals captured in the French Alps, in order to bolster food sources for the golden eagle and brown bear. The marmot’s subsequent occupation of the southern Pyrenees has been extremely fast. From an initial population of ~400 individuals, the present populatio...
Article
Full-text available
Rock ptarmigan is a vulnerable species in the southern Pyrenees, with less than 300 pairs and two unconnected populations. Alpine marmot was introduced in the northern Pyrenees between 1955 and 1988, but they rapidly colonised the southern slopes, with an actual estimated population of around 10,000 individuals. Both species are mainly herbivores,...
Article
Full-text available
La lechuza Aegolius funereus es una especie nocturna de bosque que se distribuye ampliamente por todo el mundo. Una de las poblaciones menos estudiadas de esta especie que se distribuye más al sur es la de los Pirineos. Esta población de 500 a 600 parejas, sufrió probablemente una pequeña disminución durante las últimas décadas debido a las práctic...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change will increase the frequency and the intensity of droughts in the Mediterranean region, likely reducing growth and increasing mortality of holm oaks (Quercus ilex), one of the most abundant species of Mediterranean forests. In water-limited systems such as those of the Mediterranean, carbon allocation patterns strongly favour belowgro...
Article
Alpine marmots were introduced in the French Pyrenees between 1948 and 1988. The exact number of re-introduced individuals is unknown, but it oscillated around 400. The likely preference of marmots for the southern sunny slopes rapidly facilitated their expansion to the southern Pyrenees, where the lack of both natural predators and of important in...
Article
Around 500 individuals of Alpine marmots were re-introduced in the French Pyrenees between 1954 and 1988. Marmots soon crossed the mountains to settle in the sunniest southern slopes. After 40 years or so, estimations of the marmot population in the Pyrenees suggested that there were 10000 individuals. Queries about the presence of marmots in Cerda...
Article
Stem radial growth responds to environmental conditions, and has been widely used as a proxy to study long-term patterns of tree growth and to assess the impact of environmental changes on growth patterns. In this study, we use a tree ring dataset from the Catalan Ecological and Forest Inventory to study the temporal variability of Scots pine (Pinu...
Article
In arid and semi-arid ecosystems, water availability is discontinuous, highly variable, and characterized by discrete pulse events separated by long periods of limited resource availability. Plant recruitment in these ecosystems is also episodic and dependent on the water available during and after these discrete rainfall events. Precipitation thre...
Article
While climatic extremes are predicted to increase with global warming, we know little about the effect of climatic variability on biome distribution. Here, we show that rainy El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events can enhance tree recruitment in the arid and semiarid ecosystems of north-central Chile and northwest Peru. Tree-ring studies in nat...
Article
Semiarid environments throughout the world have lost a major part of their woody vegetation and biodiversity due to the effects of wood cutting, cattle grazing and subsistence agriculture. The resulting state is typically used for cattle production, but the productivity of these systems is often very low, and erosion of the unprotected soil is a co...
Article
Full-text available
E l Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is fundamen-tally a climatic and oceanographic phenomenon, but it has profound effects on terrestrial ecosystems as well. Although the ecological effects of ENSO are becoming increasingly known from a wide range of ter-restrial ecosystems (Holmgren et al. 2001; Wright 2005), their impacts have been most intensiv...
Article
Full-text available
Climatic changes associated with the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can have a dramatic impact on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, but especially on arid and semiarid systems, where productivity is strongly limited by precipitation. Nearly two decades of research, including both short-term experiments and long-term studies conducted on three...
Article
Full-text available
Fundamentally, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a climatic and oceanographic phenomenon, but it has profound effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Although the ecological effects of ENSO are becoming increasingly known from a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems (Holmgren et al., 2001), their impacts have been more intensively studied in arid an...
Article
Prosopis pallida H.B.K. is one of the most economically and ecologically important tree species in the arid and semi-arid lands of the American continent. Sections of P. pallida were used to describe its wood anatomy and to determine whether annual rings were visible or not. Results showed that P. pallida has well-differentiated annual growth rings...
Article
Prosopis pallida H.B.K. is one of the most economically and ecologically important tree species in the arid and semi-arid lands of the American continent. Sections of P. pallida were used to describe its wood anatomy and to determine whether annual rings were visible or not. Results showed that P. pallida has well-differentiated annual growth rings...
Article
Full-text available
The dynamics of the fine root system are relevant to calculations of the carbon balance of the ecosystem, and there is also a need to quantify changes in this component caused by disturbances. Mediterranean forest systems have historically been coppiced to obtain charcoal. As a result of the resprouting capacity of holm oaks (Quercus ilex L.), thes...
Article
Summary • Fine-root longevity and phenology were studied in a Quercus ilex (holm oak) forest in Prades (NE Spain). Differences were investigated among roots that had appeared in different seasons and at different depth intervals, differentiating between white and brown roots. • Using minirhizotrons installed in March 1994, 1211 roots were monitored...
Article
Full-text available
We used minirhizotrons to determine the vertical distribution of fine roots in a holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) forest in a typical Mediterranean area over a 3-year period (June 1994–March 1997). We measured fine root density (number of roots per unit area), fine root length density (length of roots per unit area), fine root area index (area of roots p...
Article
Full-text available
The biomass, production and mortality of fine roots (roots with diameter Quercus ilex L.) forest in NE Spain using the minirhizotron methodology. A total of 1212 roots were monitored between June of 1994 and March of 1997. Mean annual fine root biomass in the holm oak forest of Prades was 718 g m–2 yr–1. Mean annual production for the period analys...
Chapter
The belowground component of terrestrial ecosystems is much less understood than any of the aboveground components, yet important ecosystem processes such as nutrient recycling, water storage, and long-term carbon accumulation occur largely in this compartment. For instance, belowground structures accounted for up to 83% of the total biomass in 13...
Article
Full-text available
Summer drought is a characteristic trait of Mediterranean climates and can limit primary production. The holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) forest at the Prades Experimental Complex of Catchments (PECC, NE Spain) was managed by clearcutting until the 1950s. As a result of this practice, the forest has a high density (13000 stems ha⁻¹) that is causing growt...
Chapter
In Mediterranean ecosystems, water is an important limiting factor for plant growth. In addition to the increase in atmospheric CO2, some models predict increased drought in Mediterranean areas as a consequence of global change. Thus, to determine how increased atmospheric CO2 interacts with increased water stress and affects Mediterranean plant gr...
Article
Full-text available
Commonly used minirhizotron methodologies imply the introduction of rigid frames into the soil. This can be a problem if the hole presents an irregular surface, because the presence of gaps can modify the normal behaviour of roots growing along the soil-tube interface. Some authors have developed inflatable adaptations of the technique, but some of...
Article
Full-text available
Regeneration of original dry forests and shrublands in degraded arid and semiarid ecosystems can be a slow and difficult process. It has been hypothesized that restoration efforts during periods of increased water availability may potentially trigger shifts back to a high vegetation cover depending on several environmental factors that govern the r...

Network