Ayokunmi Ojebode

Ayokunmi Ojebode
University of Nottingham | Notts · School of English

Doctor of Philosophy

About

11
Publications
3,544
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1
Citation
Introduction
My PhD thesis explores the postcolonial significance of names in Femi Osofisan's five dramatic works from the literary and sociocultural contexts. I employed Semiotics to connect the data to processes within the Nigerian society, culture and literature. Also, I conducted eleven interviews with experts spanning various disciplines. The study consolidates the playwright’s disposition for characterisation, demystification and social criticism of Nigeria’s postcolonial condition.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
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Although Wayetu Moore’s The Dragons, The Giant, The Woman is a memoir of the first and gruesome Liberian Civil War, which lasted eight years from 1989 to 1997, it projects heroism and socio-political underdevelopment within the context of magical realism and the supernatural. Moore relies on African orature, replete with riddles, songs, fables, and...
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Pioneering studies on the interplay of literature and medicine in Nigeria examine the representations of physical and mental illnesses and diseases in literary texts, but with little or no attention to the metaphoric portrayal of epidemiological conditions to foreground socio-political degeneration. This study, therefore, investigates medical episo...
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Tunde Kelani, a prominent Nigerian cinematographer who has come to the limelight since 1982, has nineteen (19) films among several collaborations, which underscore the Nigerian leadership question and national transformation. Scholarly reviews on Kelani exclusively focus on cultural aesthetics, storytelling narratives, political themes, didactics,...
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ÁJOBÍ AND ÁJOGBÉ: FRACTURE AND RESTRUCTURING OF NIGERIA IN CHINUA ACHEBE'S SELECTED FOLKTALES BY AYOKUNMI O. OJEBODE (PhD) Although critics of Achebe peculiarly interpret folktales in the novelist’s works as a fraction of political history in Nigeria, the salient theme of fracture and restructuring of Nigerian politics has been overlooked, par...
Article
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This study unearths some toponyms in the cognomen of the Alaafin ('Owner of the palace') of Oyo, Nigeria in order to reveal their historical cum geographic significance among Oyo Yoruba. Historically, Oyo was the largest West African empire founded 1300c. Our data comprise ten (10) purposefully selected historic towns in Southwest Nigeria while Hal...
Article
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This study extracts some zoonyms from the cognomen of the Alaafin (Owner of the palace) of Oyo, Nigeria to demonstrate their cultural cum extralinguistic consequence among the Yoruba. Traditionally, Alaafin is the titular name for a paramount ruler among Oyo people. He is an offspring of Oduduwa and has a plethora of cognomens with which he is prai...
Article
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This study explores characters in Chimamanda Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus and Kunle Afolayan’s The Figurine to reflect Nigeria’s gender, sociocultural and religious philosophies. To this effect, we fused film and prosaic genres to institute the symmetrical adaptation of gods – figurines from literary into graphic formats. Adichie depicts some delicate...
Article
Several studies have been carried on Femi Osofisan but to the exclusion of political onomastics. This study, therefore, intends to fill the gap by investigating pseudonyms in Femi Osofisan's Such is Life viz-a-viz literary and socio-political contexts. In this regard, six (6) characters' names in Osofisan's work serve as the study's data, and a por...
Article
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This study unearths the nicknames of selected cars in Nigeria in order to reveal their historical cum onomastic significance within the sociocultural milieu of the automobile users. Data comprise forty-five (45) purposively selected nicknames of some popular cars in Nigeria while Halliday’s contextual theory of meaning and VARIES model served as ou...
Article
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Onomastics, medicine and politics in this study are a pragmatic way of depicting the psychosocial condition of Nigeria as an underdeveloped nation. The study explores Femi Osofisan’s The Engagement from a literary onomastic standpoint with the aim of exposing socio-political anomalies in Nigeria. Nigerian leaders commit flaws of egoistical and indi...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines Àbíkú names in Femi Osofisan's Who's Afraid of Solarin based on their onomastic (literary) significance which provides a foray into the cyclic trend of Nigerian politics. The Àbíkú myth among the Yoruba is exploited as an instrument of blending sociocultural, literary, and political contexts of the names in the text. In this reg...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
My deep commitment to teaching and conducting ground-breaking research, especially in African literature, Cultural studies and Literary Onomastics, motivated me to enrol for the Teaching Africa Teacher programme in November 2020. My experience during the programme was very intense. I engaged in thought-provoking teaching resources and workshops and worked alongside a phenomenal coordinator whose expertise brought depth and creativity to my curriculum development.
My curriculum, ‘Home Before Naming’: Naming Practices and Yoruba Characterization in Femi Osofisan’s Selected Texts,' would immensely benefit diverse learners, especially non-Yoruba, to grasp the Yoruba naming concept in the literary context thoroughly. It adopts several audio-visuals, particularly pop culture, as teaching resources to stimulate university students' interest.
Thank you, Boston University African Studies Centre @TeachingAfrica Elsa Wiehe, Ed.D. Boston University for the privilege.

Network

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
My deep commitment to teaching and conducting ground-breaking research, especially in African literature, Cultural studies and Literary Onomastics, motivated me to enrol for the Teaching Africa Teacher programme in November 2020. My experience during the programme was very intense. I engaged in thought-provoking teaching resources and workshops and worked alongside a phenomenal coordinator whose expertise brought depth and creativity to my curriculum development. My curriculum, ‘Home Before Naming’: Naming Practices and Yoruba Characterization in Femi Osofisan’s Selected Texts,' would immensely benefit diverse learners, especially non-Yoruba, to grasp the Yoruba naming concept in the literary context thoroughly. I adopted several audio-visuals, particularly pop culture, as teaching resources to stimulate university students' interest. Thank you, Boston University African Studies Centre @TeachingAfrica Elsa Wiehe, Ed.D. Boston University for the privilege.