Aylar Abdolahzadeh

Aylar Abdolahzadeh
University of Pennsylvania | UP · Department of Anthropology

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13
Publications
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66
Citations
Introduction
Aylar Abdolahzadeh currently works at the Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania. Aylar does research in Archaeology. Their most recent publication is 'The effects of platform beveling on flake variation'.

Publications

Publications (13)
Poster
Full-text available
Frost-weathering is another type of taphonomic mechanism that relocate artifacts from the archaeological contexts, change original color of flakes, and develop microcracks inside flakes. Except for a few studies that have discussed the impact of frost-weathering on natural rocks and stone tools, controlling the effects of frost weathering processes...
Article
Full-text available
The primary focus of this paper is to examine the extent to which the pattern of Neandertal fire use in southwest France occurred at other times and places during the European Late Pleistocene. In previous studies, both direct and indirect data showed a pattern of limited fire use in layers associated with colder intervals in MIS 4 and 3 and more f...
Article
Full-text available
To understand the ways in which past stone knappers controlled the morphology of the flakes they produced, archaeologists have focused on examining the effects of striking platform attributes on flake size and shape. Among the variables commonly considered, platform width has routinely been noted to correlate with flake size and hence used to expla...
Poster
Full-text available
High temperatures and longer durations of heating have been considered as two variables that signify incidental heating exposures. Yet, the effects of these two variables on the frequency of thermal damages in lithic assemblages have not been studied. This poster presents the results of a controlled heat-fracturing experiment on actualistic knapped...
Article
Full-text available
Four ways archaeologists have tried to gain insights into how flintknapping creates lithic variability are fracture mechanics, controlled experimentation, replication and attribute studies of lithic assemblages. Fracture mechanics has the advantage of drawing more directly on first principles derived from physics and material sciences, but its rele...
Article
Full-text available
About 10 years ago, a new experimental design, based on a mechanical flaking apparatus, allowed complete control over several independent variables essential to flintknapping. This experimental setting permitted the investigation of more fundamental aspects of stone technology, including the effect of particular platform attributes, core surface mo...
Poster
Full-text available
During the Early Acheulean, large flakes, often > 10cm, were consistently produced. Controlled knapping experiments show the amount of force required to remove a flake is positively related to its size. We conducted controlled knapping experiments on cores of different raw materials (glass, basalt, flint, obsidian, banded ironstone, and andesite) t...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent experiments in a controlled setting using glass cores demonstrated the crucial effects of platform depth (PD) and exterior platform angle (EPA) on flake size and shape (Rezek & Dibble 2009, Lin et al. 2013). While glass itself is highly amenable to percussion flaking, it still leaves the question as to the applicability of the results of the...
Article
There are many ways by which knappers can influence the morphology of the flakes they produce. This article presents the results of a set of controlled experiments designed to isolate and describe the effects of platform beveling, or the removal of material from either the exterior portion of platform surface or laterally adjacent to it. We show th...
Article
Full-text available
Analyses of archaeological material recovered from several Middle Paleolithic sites in southwest France have provided strong corroborating data on Neanderthal use of fire. Both direct and indirect data show that Neanderthals in this region were frequently and/or intensively using fire during warmer periods, but such evidence declines significantly...

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