Ayesha I T Tulloch

Ayesha I T Tulloch
Queensland University of Technology | QUT

PhD

About

116
Publications
49,557
Reads
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5,330
Citations
Citations since 2016
84 Research Items
4899 Citations
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Introduction
Ayesha I T Tulloch currently works at the School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney. Ayesha is a conservation scientist interested in applying good ecological data and models to decisions about monitoring and managing threats to biodiversity. She currently co-leads the NESP project 'Developing a threatened species index' and leads the ARC DECRA project "Forecasting ecosystem decline and recovery using species co-occurrence".
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
Australian National University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2012 - August 2014
The University of Queensland
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (116)
Article
Monitoring is critical to assess management effectiveness, but broadscale systematic assessments of monitoring to evaluate and improve recovery efforts are lacking. We compiled 1,808 timeseries from 71 threatened and near‐threatened terrestrial and volant mammal species and subspecies in Australia (48% of eligible threatened mammal taxa), to compar...
Article
Carrion is an ubiquitous resource that drives the dynamics of scavenger populations and shapes the structure and composition of their communities. Corvids (Family: Corvidae) are among the most common scavengers globally, facilitating carcass discovery by other species and contributing to carcass biomass removal. Here, we examine how environmental f...
Article
Salmon and herring support both land and ocean predators and are critical to ecosystem resilience. Their linkages across land and sea realms make them highly susceptible to human activities, which can have flow-on effects up the food web. We quantify and compare the potential cumulative effects of human-driven pressures on interdependent species in...
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Aim Introduced predators negatively impact biodiversity globally, with insular fauna often most severely affected. Here, we assess spatial variation in the number of terrestrial vertebrates (excluding amphibians) killed by two mammalian mesopredators introduced to Australia, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cat (Felis catus). We aim to identif...
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Many threats to biodiversity can be predicted and are well mapped but others are uncertain in their extent, impact on biodiversity, and ability for conservation efforts to address, making them more difficult to account for in spatial conservation planning efforts, and as a result, they are often ignored. Here, we use a spatial prioritisation analys...
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During COVID-19, there has been a surge in public interest for information on immunity-boosting foods. There is little scientific support for immunity-supporting properties of specific foods, but strong evidence for food choice impacts on other health outcomes (e.g. risk of non-communicable disease) and environmental sustainability. Here, we relate...
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Urban landscapes present substantial opportunities for biodiversity conservation with residential gardens offering some of the greatest potential conservation gains given that they represent a significant proportion of the total greenspace in urbanised landscapes. However, knowledge of wildlife ecology within gardens remains scarce, likely due to t...
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Nomads challenge the prevailing approach to species conservation because their unpredictable resource-driven movements hamper data collection. We developed a monitoring approach to address the conservation needs of critically endangered, nomadic regent honeyeaters Anthochaera phrygia, whose unpredictable movements occur at a continental scale. We u...
Article
Incomplete taxonomic knowledge impedes biodiversity conservation. One in six species are classified as Data Deficient (DD) on the IUCN Red List. Despite often warranting urgent conservation attention, data-poor species are excluded from resource prioritizations and funding schemes. To enable strategic allocation of limited funds when knowledge gaps...
Article
Species traits have much to offer conservation science. However, the selection and application of trait data in conservation requires rigor to avoid perverse or unexpected outcomes. To guide trait use, we review how traits are applied along the conservation continuum: the progression of conservation actions from assessing risk, to designing and pri...
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Protected areas are important for preventing biodiversity declines, yet indicators of species' trends in protected areas rarely include threatened species. We use data from the first national Threatened Species Index developed in Australia to report on trends for threatened and near‐threatened birds inside and outside terrestrial and marine protect...
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Global food supply has substantial impacts on nature including environmental degradation from chemicals, greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity loss through agricultural land conversion. Over the past decade, public demand for information on sustainable consumption choices has increased. Meanwhile, development and expansion of the life cycle ass...
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Abstract Quantifying species population trends is crucial for monitoring progress towards global conservation targets, justifying investments, planning targeted responses and raising awareness about threatened species. Many global indicators are slow in response and report on common species, not on those at greatest risk of extinction. Here we deve...
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1. Effective biodiversity conservation requires responding to threats in a timely fashion. This entails understanding the impacts of threats on biodiversity and when interventions to mitigate threats need to be implemented. However, most ecological systems face multiple threats, so monitoring to assess their impacts on biodiversity is a complex tas...
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Australia’s 2019–2020 mega-fires were exacerbated by drought, anthropogenic climate change and existing land-use management. Here, using a combination of remotely sensed data and species distribution models, we found these fires burnt ~97,000 km2 of vegetation across southern and eastern Australia, which is considered habitat for 832 species of nat...
Article
Applied ecology has traditionally approached management problems through a simplified, single-species lens. Repeated failures of single-species management have led us to a new paradigm - managing at the ecosystem level. Ecosystem management involves a complex array of interacting organisms, processes and scientific disciplines. Accounting for inter...
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The forests of Central Africa contain some of Earth's few remaining intact forests. These forests are increasingly threatened by infrastructure development, agriculture, and unsustainable extraction of natural resources (e.g. minerals, bushmeat, and timber), all of which is leading to deforestation and forest degradation, particularly defaunation,...
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Conferences are important for professional learning and for building academics’ reputations and networks. All members of the scientific community should feel supported and free to contribute their best at such events. I evaluated the actions and policies of conferences held by international academic societies for ecology and conservation since 2009...
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Ecosystems are being altered by rapid and interacting changes in natural processes and anthropogenic threats to biodiversity. Uncertainty in historical, current and future effectiveness of actions hampers decisions about how to mitigate changes to prevent biodiversity loss and species extinctions. Research in resource management, agriculture and he...
Article
Private and Indigenous protected areas are a growing component of the global protected area network. Countries can benefit from a diversity of protected area governance types as a means of creating complementarity and robust national reserve networks. However, strategically allocating resources among governance types requires a greater understandin...
Article
Surface water availability in drylands has changed with the introduction of artificial water points. Despite known ecological impacts, detailed mapping of this change has not occurred in most drylands. We aimed to quantify the extent and distribution of changes in water availability. We tested whether water availability increased more in pastorally...
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Monitoring threatened species is vital for effective conservation, and citizen science can fill information gaps where professionally derived monitoring data are unavailable or guide where further survey efforts may be warranted. Yet the geographic and taxonomic coverage of citizen science projects are poorly understood. Using a snapshot in time ap...
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Knowledge of how disturbances such as fire shape habitat structure and composition, and affect animal interactions, is fundamental to ecology and ecosystem management. Predators also exert strong effects on ecological communities, through top‐down regulation of prey and competitors, which can result in trophic cascades. Despite their ubiquity, ecol...
Article
Interspecific competition is an essential element of the evolution of species and can strongly influence the abundance and distribution of species. Where competition interacts with anthropogenic habitat modification, this natural ecosystem process can become a threatening process. Understanding the mechanisms behind competition in such cases is ess...
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Well‐designed citizen science projects can improve the capacity of the scientific community to detect and understand declines in threatened species, and with the emergence of frameworks to guide good design, there is an opportunity to test whether projects are aligned with best practice. We assessed the current landscape of citizen science projects...
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1.Interactions between threatening processes and their effects on biodiversity are a major focus of ecological research and management. Threat interactions arise when threats or their effects co‐occur spatially and temporally. 2.Whether the associations between threats are coincidental or causally linked is poorly understood, but has fundamental im...
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Infrastructures such as roads and pipelines have environmental impacts that diffuse far beyond the local development footprint, including fragmenting habitat or changing hydrology. Broad‐scale diffuse impacts are challenging to incorporate into conservation planning and strategic environmental assessment due to difficulties in determining how impac...
Article
Dietary (scat) analysis is a key tool for assessing the potential effects of predators on prey and for comparing resource use between predators, information that is crucial for effective wildlife management. However, misidentification of the species from which scats originate could result in inaccurate conclusions regarding predator-prey interactio...
Article
Culling of overabundant and invasive species to manage their ecological impacts on target species is widely practised but outcomes are unpredictable and monitoring of effectiveness often poor. Culling must improve ecosystem function, so clear, measurable goals, such as improved breeding potential of target species, are necessary. Many overabundant...
Article
Overabundant native animals cause a variety of human–wildlife conflicts that can require management to reduce their social, environmental, or economic impacts. Culling is an intuitively attractive management response to overabundance, but poor monitoring of results and costs means that evidence for successful outcomes is often lacking. Furthermore,...
Data
S1 Details relating to time series of management effort
Data
S5 Autocorrelation coefficients for flyway counts of Svalbard pink‐footed geese and hunting bags in Jutland and Nord‐Trøndelag
Data
S6 Estimated trend in the ratio of monetary payments to scaring expenses for both the Islay and Örebro case studies
Article
Refuges for threatened species are important to prevent species extinction. They provide protection from a range of environmental and biotic stressors, and ideally provide protection against all threatening processes. However, for some species it may not be clear why some areas are refuges and others are not. The forty‐spotted pardalote (Pardalotus...
Article
1.Thresholds in the relationship between species richness and natural land cover can inform landscape‐level vegetation protection and restoration targets. However, landscapes differ considerably in composition and other environmental attributes. If the effect of natural land cover on species richness depends on (i.e. interacts with) these attribute...
Article
Indicator species are frequently used for biodiversity management but whether indicator species selection is explicit about their ability to improve management decisions remains unclear. We reviewed the scientific literature to assess whether existing methods for selecting indicator species account for the following five monitoring and management “...
Experiment Findings
Good decision-making for conservation hinges on good data. Accurate knowledge about where species occur helps us to manage them well, and this is particularly true for species that are rare or threatened. However, data are deficient for one in six IUCN-listed species. Filling these knowledge gaps is urgent if we wish to protect threatened species a...
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Inadequate information on the geographical distribution of biodiversity hampers decision-making for conservation. Major efforts are underway to fill knowledge gaps, but there are increasing concerns that publishing the locations of species is dangerous, particularly for species at risk of exploitation. While we recognize that well-informed control...
Article
A central challenge for threatened species conservation in agricultural landscapes is to understand the relative contributions of old growth, regrowth, and planted woodland to species persistence. We offer a new perspective into solving this problem by using a systematic conservation planning approach to integrate spatial biodiversity and economic...
Article
1.Making effective management decisions is challenging in multi‐species, multi‐threat systems because of uncertainty about the effects of different threats on different species. To inform management decisions, we often monitor species to detect spatial or temporal trends that can help us learn about threatening processes. However, which species to...
Experiment Findings
Full-text available
Booderee National Park is located in Jervis Bay in south-eastern Australia, around 200 km south of Sydney on the New South Wales coast between Nowra and Ulladulla. A major monitoring program began in Booderee National Park in 2003, which encompassed a range of vertebrate groups including mammals, birds, reptiles and frogs, as well as native vegetat...
Experiment Findings
A major monitoring program began in Booderee National Park in 2003, which encompassed a range of vertebrate groups including mammals, birds, reptiles and frogs, as well as native vegetation. Fifteen-years of monitoring has now revealed a major ecological surprise: localised collapses of populations of some of the park’s mammal species and the drama...
Article
The conventional approach to conserving threatened biota is to identify drivers of decline, instigate actions to mitigate threatening processes, and monitor interventions to test their effectiveness and ensure target species recover. In Australia, predation by introduced predators is a threatening process for many native mammals. Here we report the...
Article
Fire is an ecologically important process in many habitats. Increases in the frequency and intensity of wildfires due to anthropogenic activity or future changes in the global climate are suspected to impact heavily on components of the biota in fire-dependent landscapes, but there is almost no knowledge of how changes to fire regimes interact with...
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The management of conflicts between wildlife conservation and agricultural practices often involves the implementation of strategies aimed at reducing the cost of wildlife impacts on crops. Vital to the success of these strategies is the perception that changes in management efforts are synchronised relative to changes in impact levels, yet this ex...
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Mitigating the impacts of global anthropogenic change on species is conservation's greatest challenge. Forecasting the effects of actions to mitigate threats is hampered by incomplete information on species' responses. We develop an approach to predict community restructuring under threat management, which combines models of responses to threats wi...
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Developing a standardized approach to measuring the state of biodiversity in landscapes undergoing disturbance is crucial for evaluating and comparing change across different systems, assessing ecosystem vulnerability and the impacts of destructive activities, and helping direct species recovery actions. Existing ecosystem metrics of condition fail...
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As the terrestrial human footprint continues to expand, the amount of native forest that is free from significant damaging human activities is in precipitous decline. There is emerging evidence that the remaining intact forest supports an exceptional confluence of globally significant environmental values relative to degraded forests, including imp...
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In many parts of the world, conservation successes or global anthropogenic changes have led to increasing native species populations that then compete with human resource use. In the Orkney Islands, Scotland, a 60-fold increase in Greylag Goose Anser anser numbers over 24 years has led to agricultural damages and culling attempts that have failed t...
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Agricultural transformation represents one of the greatest threats to biodiversity, causing degradation and loss of habitat, leading to changes in the richness and composition of communities. These changes in richness and composition may, in turn, lead to altered species co-occurrence, but our knowledge of this remains limited. We used a novel co-o...
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Societal, economic and scientific interests in knowing where biodiversity is, how it is faring and what can be done to efficiently mitigate further biodiversity loss and the associated loss of ecosystem services are at an all-time high. So far, however, biodiversity monitoring has primarily focused on structural and compositional features of ecosys...
Article
The proliferation of linear infrastructure such as roads and rail is a major global driver of cumulative biodiversity loss. Creative interventions to minimise the impacts of this infrastructure whilst still allowing development to meet human population growth and resource consumption demands are urgently required. One strategy for reducing habitat...
Article
Conservation success is contingent on assessing social as well as environmental factors so that cost-effective implementation of strategies and actions can be placed in a broad social-ecological context. Until now, the focus has been on how to include spatially-explicit social data in conservation planning, whereas the value of different kinds of s...
Article
Conservation planners must reconcile trade-offs associated with using biodiversity data of differing qualities to make decisions. Coarse habitat classifications are commonly used as surrogates to design marine reserve networks when fine-scale biodiversity data are incomplete or unavailable. Although finely-classified habitat maps provide more detai...
Article
The distribution of mobile species in dynamic systems can vary greatly over time and space. Estimating their population size and geographic range can be problematic, with serious implications for conservation assessments. Scarce data on mobile species and the resources they need can also limit the type of analytical approaches available to derive s...
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Nomadic birds move around the landscape in complex, irregular patterns, making it difficult for conservation managers and planners to decide where and how to act to mitigate threatening processes. Because of this uncertainty, nomadic species are poorly represented in protected areas in Australia. We outline approaches to discover nomadic species di...