Axel G. Ekström

Axel G. Ekström
KTH Royal Institute of Technology | KTH · Department of Speech, Music and Hearing (TMH)

Evolution of speech

About

5
Publications
363
Reads
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3
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
3 Citations
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Introduction
My name is Axel G. Ekström. I'm a doctoral student with the division of Speech, Music & Hearing. My research interests are principles and phenomena of speech and vocal communication from psychological, comparative and evolutionary perspectives. As of 2022, I am also affiliated with the Laboratory of Language Evolution, Institute of Biology, University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland.
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - present
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Position
  • Research Assistant
September 2020 - September 2021
Lund University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Working with the division of neuropsychology, I was involved in data collection using eye tracking and electroencephalography.
March 2020 - present
Lund University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Project "Filter bubbles and ideological segregation online: Do we need regulation of search engines".
Education
September 2019 - June 2021
Lund University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Science
September 2017 - June 2019
Uppsala University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Analysis of nonhuman, great ape vocal behavior may provide insight into the evolu-tion of human speech. Two main impositions prohibit such work. The first and mostobvious is the scarcity of relevant data; even though literature on primate vocalizationstretches back decades, high-quality data are rare and seldom publicly available. Thesecond—far mor...
Article
Full-text available
Every normally developing human infant solves the difficult problem of mapping their native-language phonology, but the neural mechanisms underpinning this behavior remain poorly understood. Here, motor constellation theory, an integrative neurophonological model, is presented, with the goal of explicating this issue. It is assumed that infants’ mo...
Article
Full-text available
This text reviews recent research in phonetic size-sound symbolism – non-arbitrary attributions of size properties to speech acoustic properties. Evidence from a wide range of research works is surveyed, and recent findings from research on the relationships between fundamental frequency, vowel articulation, consonant articulation, phonation type,...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence suggests that human non-verbal speech may be rich in iconicity. Here, we report results from two experiments aimed at testing whether perception of increasing and declining f 0 can be iconically mapped onto motion events. We presented a sample of mixed-nationality participants ( N = 118) with sets of two videos, where one pictured upward m...
Article
Full-text available
It is commonly assumed that algorithmic curation of search results creates filter bubbles, where users’ beliefs are continually reinforced and opposing views are suppressed. However, empirical evidence has failed to support this hypothesis. Instead, it has been suggested that filter bubbles may result from individuals engaging selectively with info...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Aims to uncover clues to the evolution of human speech, through the study of great ape vocalization, and through comparisons with human speech.
Project
Theoretical developments in the study of infants phonological acquisition and development.