Aviv Shoham

Business Administration, Marketing

PhD
29.75

Publications

  • Aviv Shoham · Yossi Gavish · Gregory M. Rose
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This meta-analytic integration has three purposes: first, to evaluate the outcomes of consumer animosity and consumer ethnocentrism using empirical studies on this subject; second, to test an integrative conceptual model; and third, to report on the total effects of animosity/ethnocentrism on later constructs (willingness to buy and buying/owning). A meta-analysis is a suitable approach using a large collection of results from individual studies for the purpose of integrating their findings. As a result, a meta-analysis was used to integrate and combine the contradictory outcomes of studies and for analyzing variability in effect sizes across findings. Its results can be used to guide future research. The current study suggests that the relationship between consumer animosity and product quality judgments is negative. In addition, this study emphasizes the role of product quality judgments as a partial mediator between consumer animosity/consumer ethnocentrism and willingness to buy. This study unravels the tangled state of the pertinent literature by identifying and evaluating the outcome factors of animosity and consumer ethnocentrism and their influence on some core marketing variables, such as product quality judgment, willingness to buy, and actual buying.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of International Consumer Marketing

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015
  • Aviv Shoham · Yossi Gavish · Sigal Segev
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study tests a model to investigate the extent to which drivers of compulsive and impulsive buying behaviors overlap. The model includes personal and cultural antecedents for traits of consumer impulsiveness and compulsiveness and impulsive and compulsive buying behaviors as outcomes. Survey results from 336 Israeli and 595 U.S. consumers indicate that the personality antecedents envy, low self-esteem, and fantasizing generally drive consumer traits of impulsiveness and compulsiveness, though some differences exist between consumers in the U.S. and Israel. However, cultural orientations were found to be insignificant in driving traits of impulsiveness or compulsiveness.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Journal of International Consumer Marketing
  • Source
    Sigal Segev · Aviv Shoham · Yossi Gavish
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: This study aims to unbundle the materialism construct into its three facets – centrality, success and happiness: to provide a fine-grained model that delineates the relationship between some of its antecedents (i.e. depression, anxiety, self esteem and affect) and consequences (life satisfaction, innovativeness, time spent shopping and environmentalism). Design/methodology/approach: Using a convenience sample of 568 adult consumers, this study tests a model in which a set of psychological variables serve as antecedents of materialism and its three facets, which in turn affect a set of cognitive, psychological and behavioral consequences. Findings: Results indicate that specific facets have more weight than others, depending on the nature of the needs individuals seek to fulfill through possessions, or their resulting behaviors and cognitions. Results validate the view of materialism as a coping mechanism, but also show that the consequences of materialism can be both positive and negative depending on their underlying facet. Research limitations/implications: This study used a convenience sample, which might affect the generalizability of its findings. The materialism centrality subscale showed a lower than desirable level of reliability. Future research might consider using the longer, 6-item version of this sub-scale. Practical implications: This study helps marketers identify the circumstances under which materialism can lead to negative or positive consequences. Marketers should be careful when designing messages that make unrealistically strong associations between consumption and happiness, positive emotions, self-worth and satisfaction with life. Social implications: The negative social and personal consequences of materialism call for the formulation of policies designed to reduce them, and marketers’ responsibility to consumers’ well-being, especially among potentially vulnerable segments of the population. Originality/value: This study provides an in-depth analysis of the materialism construct, its antecedents and outcomes. It advances our understanding of how materialism works by examining each facet separately and how it is related to the various psychological antecedents and consumer behavior outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of Consumer Marketing
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the reasons for the lack of research attention paid to the Middle East (ME) and Africa regions. In particular, this study seeks to identify the reasons for and implications of the paucity of ME-and Africa-based studies in high-quality international journals in the marketing field with a specific focus on the challenges in conducting and publishing research on these regions. Design/methodology/approach - The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature on the ME and Africa regions to identify papers published in 23 high-quality marketing, international business, and advertising journals. This search resulted in 301 articles, among which 125 articles were based on primary or secondary data collected from a local source in those regions. The authors of these 125 articles constitute the Delphi study sample. These academics provided input in an effort to reach a consensus regarding the two proposed models of academic research in both regions. Findings - This paper differs from previous studies, where academic freedom emerged as the most important inhibitor to conducting and publishing research. The most frequently mentioned challenges in conducting research in Africa were access to data, data collection issues, diversity of the region, and lack of research support infrastructure. For the ME, the most often described challenges included validity and reliability of data, language barriers, data collection issues, and availability of a network of researchers. Editors' and reviewers' low interest and limited knowledge were ranked high in both regions. South Africa, Israel, and Turkey emerged as outliers, in which research barriers were less challenging than in the rest of the two regions. The authors attribute this difference to the high incidence of US-trained or US-based scholars originating from these countries. Originality/value - To the best of the knowledge, no marketing studies have discussed the problems of publishing in high-quality international journals of marketing, international business, and advertising for either region. Thus, most of the issues the authors discuss in this paper offer new insightful results while supplementing previous research on the challenges of conducting and publishing research on specific world regions.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · International Marketing Review
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Organizational learning orientation and social networking have been recognized as drivers of innovativeness and performance. The authors’ study extends existing research on these concepts in several ways. First, they posit that innovativeness mediates the effects of social networking and learning orientation on performance. Second, they propose that environmental munificence moderates the hypothesized relationships. Third, data for the study were collected in Pakistan, which represents a novel and as-yet-unexplored context for this type of research. A structural equation model based on 176 small firms in Pakistan supported most of the hypothesized relationships.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Global Marketing
  • Aviv Shoham · Vassilis Dalakas · Lia Lahav
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aggressive behaviors by sport spectators have become a major social problem in multiple sports and numerous countries. This study examines several team-related antecedents, as well as personality traits that may be related with physical and verbal aggressive fan behaviors. Interestingly, there appears to be relatively little crossover effects of personality trait verbal aggression on actual physical aggressive behaviors. Similarly, trait physical aggression effects also do not cross over and do not appear to affect verbal aggressive behaviors. These and additional drivers of aggressive fan behavior are discussed and their theoretical and practical implications are provided.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Services Marketing Quarterly
  • Source
    Sigal Segev · Ayalla Ruvio · Aviv Shoham · Dalia Velan
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of acculturation on immigrant consumers' loyalty. The authors posit that the acculturation orientation of immigrants determines their consumer loyalty to both ethnic and mainstream brands and stores. Design/methodology/approach - Using a sample of Hispanic consumers in the USA and consumers from the former Soviet Union in Israel, this study tests a model in which two acculturation continua, original culture maintenance and host culture adaptation, serve as antecedents for immigrants' consumer loyalty. Findings - Acculturation determines the extent of immigrants' consumer loyalty. Both acculturation continua are associated with distinct loyalty patterns that are similar across the two immigrant groups. Research limitations/implications - Despite sampling limitations, the paper demonstrates that immigrants' acculturation orientation influences their loyalty to ethnic and mainstream brands and stores. Shared by ethnic consumers in two culturally diverse markets, this relationship transcends geographic boundaries. Practical implications - The results provide insights for marketers with respect to the development of segmentation and positioning strategies and tactical implementations that address the preferences of ethnic consumers. Social implications - This paper highlights the importance of understanding the unique needs of ethnic consumers and addressing them. Successful integration of immigrant consumers into the marketplace can also help in their integration into the host society at large. Originality/value - Findings shed light on the commonalities and differences among immigrant groups in different national settings. The paper highlights the role of cultural transition as a key experience that affects immigrants regardless of specific environmental or situational circumstances.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · European Journal of Marketing
  • Itzhak Gnizy · Aviv Shoham
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Reverse internationalization (RI) is a crucial phenomenon in a world of globalization; however, research on RI remains scarce. In light of the 2008–2009 economical global crises, many internationalizing firms worldwide have deinternationalized. Given that scholars and functionaries have been sending warning signals about imminent global crisis, revisiting the RI domain and its drivers is a timely and important research area.This study uses a qualitative approach with a prime objective of exploratory work and theory development of RI. The study explicates the RI phenomenon further, proposes a broader RI conceptualization and an operational definition, and develops propositions and a model to direct future research and assist managers. Grounded in data emerged from field in-depth interviews of senior managers, findings show that RI emerges as a multifaceted formative construct reflecting a reduction in firms’ activities on one or more explicit dimensions. Various internal and external factors foster RI. Since firms apply sophisticated forms of international involvement, RI domain should address its wide-ranging forms with a clearer and richer view that facilitates its conceptualization. Managers learn to pay attention to likely scenarios where episodes in internationalization may arise and lead to RI and of ways to approach them.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Journal of Global Marketing
  • Itzhak Gnizy · Aviv Shoham
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The role played by the marketing function (MF) has been subjected to considerable academic and public media attention. Recent research reflects an ongoing debate on MF's decreasing influence attributed by some to its poor performance. However, studies have analyzed the general marketing (GM) function and domestic operations and remained silent on international marketing's (IM) influence and its impact on firms' international operations and performance as another aspect of marketing's influence. This lacuna is unfortunate, given that internationalization is crucial to many firms in today's globalizing world. The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactions between IM and GM functions as determinants of IM's influence. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The study extends previous models to the international context, utilizes an inclusive set of strategic international orientations as consequences and mediators of IM's influence, and assesses possible synergy between orientations. Findings ‐ IM functions are influential, valuable, and play an important role. IM-GM coordination enhances IMs' influence while IM-GM conflicts and IM's influence are unrelated. IMs' influence enhances performance directly and indirectly through orientations. Importantly, the combined orientations had a negative synergistic effect on performance. Research limitations/implications ‐ International marketers and top management should consider tactics to increase IMs' influence and thus benefit their firms. Originality/value ‐ The study is the first to recognize and empirically focus on the relationships between IM and GM as distinct functions. The study accounts for a combined impact of international orientations on international performance.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2014 · International Marketing Review
  • Source
    Dalia Velean · Aviv Shoham · Yoel Asseraf
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A major research stream on effective global strategies has recognized business orientations as key drivers of global performance (e.g., Cadogan et al., 2001; Knight and Kim 2009; Zou and Cavusgil 1996). For example, since the seminal conceptualizations of market orientation were introduced (Kohli and Jaworski 1990; Narver and Slater 1990), it has been found to impact performance positively in domestic and international operations (e.g., Cadogan et al., 1999; Knight 1997). However, the complexity of the global market and the difficulties associated with availability, accessibility, and quality of needed information present firms with a need for additional strategic emphases (Diamantopoulos and Cadogan 1996). Accordingly, this research model focus on four strategic orientations, which separately and in combinations, have been discussed in the literature as international performance drivers. To our best knowledge, no previous study has assessed MILE orientation (Market, Innovative, Learning, and Entrepreneurial) as a high-order construct in the context of international operations and performance.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • Source
    Gavriel Dahan · Aviv Shoham
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Strategic orientations have attracted scholars' attention across disciplines and the pros and cons of such orientations have been studied extensively. However, previous literature largely ignored possible interrelationships between these orientations. In sum, most studies have not examined potential synergetic effects of multiple orientations. Against this background, we develop an integrative model, which proposes relationships between antecedents and performance consequences of pioneering, entrepreneurial, and stakeholder orientations. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • Source
    Amir Lahat · Aviv Shoham
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the popularity of research on benchmarking and on market-based learning, as well as their theoretical importance, several gaps exist in the literature. Most research has tended to focus on specific disciplinary silos in isolation. For example, several studies have examined these issues in the marketing discpline. Likewise, other studies have focused on manufacturing capabilities to the neglect of other facets of firms' operations. However, few have examined benchmarking and organizational learning in multiple discplines. The model developed in this paper furthers the understanding of firms' benchmarking of strategies in two discplines, namely marketing and operational (R&D and manufacturing) capabilities. These are modeled as drivers of international performance. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Organizational innovativeness (OI) is a central concept in academic research and managerial practice. In many cases, OI has been operationalized as the number of innovations organizations adopt. In contrast, this paper conceptualizes OI as a five-dimensional construct (creativity, openness, future orientation, risk-taking, and proactiveness) representing the organizational climate, which refers to the organization's ability to generate ideas and innovate continually over time. The findings support the conceptualization and operationalization of the five-dimensional OI, validated in Norway, Israel, and Spain. These results shed new light on existing findings and can promote new research directions as well as guide strategic managerial decision-making.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · Journal of Product Innovation Management
  • Kalanit Efrat · Aviv Shoham
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Entry modes are a central aspect of international business, particularly for young firms lacking organizational experience and capital, such as born global (BG) firms. Few studies on BG internationalization have addressed the antecedents to entry mode decisions in BG firms. Based on the two main groups of factors impacting entry mode decisions in general, namely environmental (external) conditions and firms' strategic characteristics, the purpose of this paper is to explore how the interaction between country and market factors and BGs' strategic orientation affects BGs' choice of low- vs high-commitment entry modes. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Data from 104 Israeli high-tech BG firms were gathered in field interviews with managers. Preliminary analyses assessed non-response bias. Findings ‐ Most BGs showed a strong Prospector orientation manifested by exploration and exploitation of opportunities. This in turn moderated the impact of several host market factors on the choice of entry mode, encouraging BGs to choose high-commitment entry modes. Practical implications ‐ Contrary to earlier research claiming that BGs minimize risk by choosing low-commitment entry modes, the findings show that BGs' choice of commitment level is affected by host market characteristics. Originality/value ‐ It is often thought that BGs' choice of entry mode is decisively affected by the host market risk profile, encouraging the choice of low-commitment entry modes in riskier markets. As the findings show, however, BGs are also sensitive to the opportunities provided by the host market, sometimes resulting in high-commitment entry modes.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · International Marketing Review
  • Source
    Ruth Segev · Aviv Shoham · Ayalla Ruvio
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Previous research on impression management explored motives, the use of impression management tactics and the influence of personality characteristics on the tendency to engage in impression management. The purposes of this research are to examine gift-giving behavior among adolescents based on the building blocks of impression management theory, the ways that personality characteristics motivate gift-givers to engage in active and defensive impression management and how the use of impression management tactics (i.e. similarity-conformity and target-enhancement) are reflected in their gift-giving behavior. Design/methodology/approach ‐ A convenience sample of 141 adolescences was used in a quantitative study. Self-report questionnaires were distributed to adolescents of different ages (13-16), with students from diverse social strata. Students were asked to recall a recent peer gift-giving experience and to refer to it when answering the questions which covered motives for gift-giving, personality characteristics, and the characteristics of the gift. Findings ‐ The authors' study shows that personality characteristics such as public self-consciousness, self-monitoring, and self-esteem are positively related with gift-giving motives. Additionally, gift-giving motives are positively related with the use of similarity-conformity and target-enhancement tactics. Finally, the use of impression management tactics reflects adolescents' special characteristics, such as their tendency towards conformism, important role of peers in their lives, and their high need to protect and nurture these social resources. Originality/value ‐ This research explored the instrumental role of gift-giving among adolescents and contributes to the existing literatures on gift-giving, impression management, and adolescents' consumer behavior.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Journal of Consumer Marketing
  • Source
    Kalanit Efrat · Aviv Shoham
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aggressive driving is a growing problem worldwide. Previous research has provided us with some insights into the characteristics of drivers prone to aggressiveness on the road and into the external conditions triggering such behavior. Little is known, however, about the personality traits of aggressive drivers. The present study proposes planned behavior and materialism as predictors of aggressive driving behavior. Data was gathered using a questionnaire-based survey of 220 individuals from twelve large industrial organizations in Israel. Our hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. Our results indicate that while planned behavior is a good predictor of the intention to behave aggressively, it has no impact on the tendency to behave aggressively. Materialism, however, was found to be a significant indicator of aggressive driving behavior. Our study is based on a self-reported survey, therefore might suffer from several issues concerning the willingness to answer truthfully. Furthermore, the sampling group might be seen as somewhat biased due to the relatively high income/education levels of the respondents. While both issues, aggressive driving and the theory of planned behavior, have been studied previously, the linkage between the two as well as the ability of materialism to predict aggressive behavior received little attention previously. The present study encompasses these constructs providing new insights into the linkage between them.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Accident; analysis and prevention
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Relying on organizational innovativeness for long-term growth and profitability can be difficult, time consuming, and expensive. In the context of service delivery of 395 strategic business units (SBU) in Israel's healthcare industry, this paper examines the role of a learning-orientation as a moderator in an integrative model of organizational innovativeness. We find moderation of the impacts of risk-taking, creativity, competitor benchmarking orientation, and environmental opportunities on innovativeness. Moreover, we find the influence on performance pronounced for high learning-oriented SBUs. The paper shows that learning orientation should be considered for understanding effective innovativeness work for competitive service delivery.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Journal of Engineering and Technology Management
  • Aviv Shoham · Ossi Pesämaa
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Following the seminal work of Bruner and Kumar (2007) on gadget loving, this paper views gadget loving as the attachment individuals have toward advanced electronic items and how such an attachment relates to actual use (i.e., actual gadgets ownership). It extends existing research in two important ways. First, it provides a retest of the reliability and validity of the gadget-loving scale in two new countries (Israel and Sweden), thus adding to the generalizability of the scale across cultures. Second, it develops and tests an integrative model that includes gadget loving as a central construct as well as several antecedents and consequences proposed as important topics for future research in the extant literature. The results show that inherent novelty seeking, technological innovativeness, and technical curiosity predict the gadget-loving trait, which in turn affects technological opinion leadership and gadget ownership. These findings have theoretical and practical implications.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013 · Psychology and Marketing
  • Source
    Ayalla Ruvio · Yossi Gavish · Aviv Shoham
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the consumer's doppelganger effect, the inclination of consumers to intentionally mimic other individuals' consumption behaviors. Taking a role model perspective, we look at the inclination of Israeli teenage girls to resonate with role models with whom they have unidirectional (study 1; N = 152) and bidirectional (study 2; N = 343) relationships. The findings demonstrate that consumers' doppelgangers have a strong inclination to intentionally emulate other individuals' consumption behavior when they perceive them as consumer role models, an assessment that is rooted in their view of these individuals as relevant. The contributions of this research relate to the study of mimicry, role modeling, and family consumption. Copyright
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Consumer Behaviour

13 Following View all

94 Followers View all