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Avadhoot Velankar

Avadhoot Velankar

Doctor of Philosophy

About

19
Publications
8,649
Reads
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127
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
125 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - December 2017
GOI-UNDP-GEF Sindhudurg project
Position
  • Researcher
January 2006 - May 2009
Wildlife Institute of India
Position
  • Senior Researcher

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Changes in the habitat can drive the species to adapt to the changing environment that may lead to a risk of infection and the emergence of diseases. The prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites (henceforth endo-parasites) in a species is an indicator of changing habitat conditions, and the study of the same is important when the species is restric...
Article
In primates, males compete for a mate, which is a non-sharable resource. This makes the conditions less conducive for males to have stable relationships. One such special kind of relationship is a bond where the interactions are reciprocated, equitable and differentiated. Bonds in macaque societies are based on the degree of within-group contest co...
Article
Full-text available
Increased occupation of primate habitats by humans has forced primates into close contact with their settlements and crops. We conducted a survey with the island settlers on Great Nicobar Island to investigate the conflict between farmers and Nicobar long-tailed macaques. The conflict may have increased following the 2004 tsunami due to the co-depe...
Article
Primates maintain social bonds with specific individuals in the group by directing grooming toward them. Social grooming is often targeted toward individuals with whom the most benefits can be exchanged, which are usually the high-ranking individuals. We used the Seyfarth model to investigate whether dominance rank alters the distribution of groomi...
Article
Full-text available
Chinkara (Gazella bennettii), the Indian gazelle, is a widespread antelope in the arid and semi-arid regions of the Indian subcontinent; however, the species has been relatively unexplored to the south of its distribution range. In 2016, with indefinite evidence of chinkara presence in Yadahalli Reserved Forest, Karnataka, India, the Forest Departm...
Article
Full-text available
A rank changeover is a sexual strategy by primate males to gain access to reproductive females. We observed one such event in the Nicobar long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis umbrosus) at the Great Nicobar Island, India. In the three and half months of the post-rank changeover period, the home range reduced significantly while there was no chan...
Article
The Indian crested porcupine, Hystrix indica, is a significant ecosystem engineer that builds extensive burrows in the semi-arid regions of north-west India. Many different animals use these burrows as temporary retreats or permanent shelters. Camera-traps were used to record 22 species using porcupine burrows, including 10 mammals, 8 birds, 3 rept...
Article
Full-text available
Group living primates often participate in between-group encounters to defend monopolizable resources. Participation in an encounter is influenced by the density and abundance of resources and the relative fighting ability of groups. We studied between-group encounters in three groups of Nicobar long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis umbrosus) i...
Article
Full-text available
Macaques possess a repertoire of extractive foraging techniques that range from complex manipulation to tool-aided behaviors, to access food items that increase their foraging efficiency substantially. However, the complexity and composition of such techniques vary considerably between species and even between populations. In the present study, we...
Article
Full-text available
The Nicobar long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis umbrosus) is confined to the southern and central Nicobar archipelago. We have collected demographic and birth data for five groups of M. f. umbrosus to understand their group structure, demography and breeding seasonality. Group size, individuals in age- sex classes and age-sex ratio did not var...
Article
Full-text available
A biodiversity assessment of any region is a fundamental necessity towards implementing an efficient conservation action plan. The alteration of habitat and vegetation composition through the successful invasion of non-indigenous species can be a serious management issue. The most prominent threat resulting in a rapid decline of native plant commun...
Article
Full-text available
Natural disasters pose a threat to isolated populations of species with restricted distributions, especially those inhabiting islands. The Nicobar long tailed macaque.Macaca fascicularis umbrosus, is one such species found in the three southernmost islands (viz. Great Nicobar, Little Nicobar and Katchal) of the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago, Indi...
Data
Details of the trail survey conducted. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Physical and ecological factors such as season, rainfall, food availability, number of plant species eaten, intergroup encounters, and degree of terrestriality influence the daily path length (DPL) and home range use of animals. We examined whether these factors influenced DPL and home range use in a group of endemic lion-tailed macaques (Macaca si...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
Social relationships in macaque females depend upon food availability, presence of predator and phylogenetic inertia. Uniform and non-monopolizable food resource leads to lesser aggression among the females giving rise to egalitarian society with low linearity in dominance whereas patchily distributed and monopolizable food gives to despotic society with highly linear dominance. Similarly, absence of predators gives rise to an egalitarian society. Not only ecological factors but even phylogeny plays an important role in shaping female society. According to Thierry’s classification long tailed macaque is supposed to be despotic species. If phylogenetic inertia plays the main role then even the Nicobar subspecies is supposed to be despotic even though it is has been separated. Besides, there is a need to understand individual roles in framing a society type. So our proposed study will investigate the ecological factors and phylogenetic underpinnings of female society utilizing social network analysis (SNA) to understand roles played by each female. This section will also have papers from our project on Nicobar Long-Tailed macaques which may not be directly related to social relationships.