Auriel M.V. Fournier

Auriel M.V. Fournier
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | UIUC · Illinois Natural History Survey

PhD

About

36
Publications
27,589
Reads
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239
Citations
Introduction
I'm a Wetland Bird Ecologist with the Illinois Natural History Survey and the Director of Forbes Biological Station
Additional affiliations
April 2017 - present
Mississippi State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2012 - April 2017
University of Arkansas
Position
  • Research Assistant
January 2012 - May 2012
Michigan Technological University
Position
  • Bird Bander
Description
  • I worked as a full time bird banding working with endemic birds in high elevation rain forests on the Big Island. Took feather and blood samples and detailed morphometric data.
Education
August 2012 - May 2017
University of Arkansas
Field of study
  • Biology
August 2008 - December 2011
Michigan Technological University
Field of study
  • Wildlife Ecology and Management

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
1. Stable hydrogen isotope (δD) methods for tracking animal movement are widely used yet often produce low resolution assignments. Incorporating prior knowledge of abundance, distribution, or movement patterns can ameliorate this limitation but data are lacking for most species. We demonstrate how observations reported by citizen scientists can be...
Article
Full-text available
We sampled clapper rail (Rallus crepitans) feathers from museum specimens collected between 1965 and 2010 to investigate changes in mercury (Hg) availability in coastal marshes of New Hanover County, North Carolina. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N) was conducted to control for dietary shifts that may have influenced Hg exposure. Hg concentra...
Article
Full-text available
Many advertised field-technician positions sound worthwhile, but have no or very low pay. Although these can be valuable experiences, not paying technicians for their work undermines their professionalism and the professionalism of science as a whole. These unpaid technician positions are available to only the privileged few; and the positions excl...
Article
Full-text available
Virginia rails (Rallus limicola) are secretive marsh birds found in freshwater wetlands across much of North American. There is currently no known way to differentiate between the sexes in the field. We suggest the use of morphometric discriminant analysis as an effective method to separate males and females. We compared the length of the culmen, t...
Article
Full-text available
Rails (Family: Rallidae) are among the most difficult birds to detect. Although methods have been developed to optimize detection during the breeding season, there is no current suitable survey method for the nonbreeding season. Low detection of rails and lack of suitable methods limit monitoring efforts and examination of important questions relat...
Article
Full-text available
Methods are being developed to capitalize on citizen science data for research and monitoring, but these data are rarely used within established decision-making frameworks of wildlife agencies. Citizen science data are often collected at higher resolution and extent than targeted monitoring programs, and may provide complementary information. Here,...
Article
Full-text available
During the last 2 centuries, widespread declines have been observed in migratory species, and these declines have largely been linked to anthropogenic causes. Migrants move across multiple spatiotemporal scales with wide-ranging movements that can cross multiple jurisdictions. Consequently, conservation and management require the incorporation of t...
Article
Although most emergent wetlands across central North America have been destroyed or degraded, wetland restoration in recent decades has provided new habitat resources for wetland birds in agriculturally dominated landscapes. The goals of wetland restorations often include providing habitat for migratory and breeding waterfowl and other wetland bird...
Article
Full-text available
The recognized gap between research and implementation in avian conservation can be overcome with translational ecology, an intentional approach in which science producers and users from multiple disciplines work collaboratively to co-develop and deliver ecological research that addresses management and conservation issues. Avian conservation natur...
Article
The recognized gap between research and implementation in avian conservation can be overcome with translational ecology, an intentional approach in which science producers and users from multiple disciplines work collaboratively to co-develop and deliver ecological research that addresses management and conservation issues. Avian conservation natur...
Article
Full-text available
Marsh birds (rallids, bitterns, and grebes) depend on emergent wetlands, and habitat loss and degradation are the primary suspected causes for population declines among many marsh bird species. We evaluated the effect of natural wetland characteristics, wetland management practices, and surrounding landscape characteristics on marsh bird occupancy...
Chapter
Full-text available
Recommendations for study design, data gathering, data use, and data sharing that promote collaboration and learning about birds in the northern Gulf of Mexico
Article
Full-text available
Eradicating invasive species is a key part of island restoration, and can reverse the devastating impacts on native biota. Rodents are one of the most widespread invasive species, found on 80% of oceanic island systems, but have been removed from hundreds of islands through the application of anticoagulant-treated cereal bait. While such eradicatio...
Article
Full-text available
Direct tracking methods in combination with remote sensing data allow examination of habitat use by birds during migration. Species that roost communally during migration, such as some swallows, form large aggregations that can attract both avian and terrestrial predators. However, the extent to which they might use patchy habitats that could reduc...
Article
Full-text available
Unpaid work in the sciences is advocated as an entry route into scientific careers. We compared the success of UK science graduates who took paid or unpaid work six-months after graduation in obtaining a high salary or working in a STEM (Science, Technology Engineering and Mathematics) field 3.5 years later. Initially taking unpaid work was associa...
Article
Detecting population declines is a critical task for conservation biology. Logistical difficulties and the spatiotemporal variability of populations make estimation of population declines difficult. For statistical reasons, estimates of population decline may be biased when study sites are chosen based on abundance of the focal species. In this sit...
Preprint
Detecting population declines is a critical task for conservation biology. The spatiotemporal variability of populations, along with logistical difficulties in population estimation, makes this task difficult. Here we call attention to a possible bias in estimates of population decline: when study sites are chosen based on abundance of the focal sp...
Preprint
Detecting population declines is a critical task for conservation biology. The spatiotemporal variability of populations, along with logistical difficulties in population estimation, makes this task difficult. Here we call attention to a possible bias in estimates of population decline: when study sites are chosen based on abundance of the focal sp...
Preprint
Full-text available
Detecting population declines is a critical task for conservation biology. The spatiotemporal variability of populations, along with logistical difficulties in population estimation, makes this task difficult. Here we call attention to a possible bias in estimates of population decline: when study-site selection is influenced by the focal species’...
Preprint
Full-text available
Detecting population declines is a critical task for conservation biology. The spatiotemporal variability of populations, along with logistical difficulties in population estimation, makes this task difficult. Here we call attention to a possible bias in estimates of population decline: when study-site selection is influenced by the focal species’...
Article
Full-text available
We first observed Sora (Porzana carolina) swimming and diving under water while capturing them with hand nets at night. Since that time, we have observed the behavior several times and documented it with photos and video. Rails are among the most elusive birds. Despite living in wetlands, water depth has often been discussed as a factor limiting ha...
Data
Supplementary Table II. Summary of available habitat mean, minimum and maximum values across and by year for wetland impoundments in Missouri, USA surveyed for Sora (Porzana carolina) from 2012-2016
Article
Full-text available
Palustrine wetland management across the USA is often conducted under a moist soil management framework aimed at providing energetic resources for non-breeding waterfowl. Moist soil management techniques typically include seasonal water-level manipulations and mechanical soil disturbance to create conditions conducive to germination and growth of e...
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring and conserving waterbirds, including Sora (Porzana carolina), in Missouri, is constrained by the lack of information on migration phenology. We performed nocturnal distance sampling surveys by ATV across 11 state and federal managed wetlands in Missouri, USA from 2012-2015 to compare the timing of Sora' autumn migration among years. Migr...
Article
Full-text available
Stable isotopes have been used to estimate migratory connectivity in many species. Estimates are often greatly improved when coupled with species distribution models (SDMs), which temper estimates in relation to occurrence. SDMs can be constructed using from point locality data from a variety of sources including extensive monitoring data typically...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stable isotopes have been used to estimate migratory connectivity in many species. Estimates are often greatly improved when coupled with species distribution models (SDMs), which temper estimates in relation to occurrence. SDMs can be constructed using from point locality data from a variety of sources including extensive monitoring data typically...
Article
Full-text available
Virginia and Yellow Rails are among the least studied birds in North America, and there is a specific lack of information about their autumn migration ecology and migratory habitat use. We conducted nocturnal surveys across 11 public wetlands in Missouri, USA from 2012-2016, and compared the timing of autumn migration from our surveys with three op...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies have documented the arrival time of spring migration of Virginia Rails (Rallus limicola), King Rails (R. elegans), and Soras (Porzana carolina) on the southwestern shore of Lake Erie, though not in recent decades, and most of this information is based on anecdotal records. These three species were captured in wetlands on Ottawa Nati...

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